Transfer Factor

In 2011 I was working with a knowledgeable nutritionist who was helping me restore my GI tract after I’d successfully vanquished a nasty Clostridium difficile infection that began in April 2010 while I was on vacation. Fortunately, the infection wasn’t fatal as it often is but it certainly was inconvenient and became debilitating after I returned home.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 30,000 people in the US die every year from C. diff and millions of people of all ages suffer with non-fatal infections. (Peggy Lillis Memorial Foundation, 2014).
If you want to read more about how I got rid of the C. diff infection without antibiotics, my Oriental Medicine Journal article Successful Holistic Treatment of Clostridium difficile Gut Infection: Case Study is online here.
The nutritionist recommended an interesting nutritional supplement called 4Life Transfer Factor Plus to help boost my immune system. I now take a maintenance dose of 1 capsule 3x/day.

 

TRANSFER FACTORS are molecules that actually transfer immune memory and knowledge from one immune system to another. The 4Life Transfer Factor Plus supplement is made from bovine colostrum and chicken egg yolk.  These molecules contain antigen information which educates, enhances, and helps maintain immune system balance.

 

COLOSTRUM is an important precursor to the milk produced by mammals (including humans) for nursing their offspring. It is very easy to digest; a yellow to orange color; thick and sticky; low in fat; and high in carbohydrates, protein, and antibodies to help keep the baby healthy. The concentration of immune factors is much higher in colostrum than in mature milk. All this makes it the perfect first food for a baby mammal.

Colostrum (on left) vs Milk (on right)

Colostrum works as a natural and 100% safe vaccine. It contains large quantities of an antibody called secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA). In the womb the baby received the benefit of another antibody, called IgG, through the placenta. IgG worked through the fetus’s circulatory system but IgA protects the baby in the places most likely to come under attack from germs, namely the mucous membranes in the throat, lungs, and intestines.