ANTIBIOTICS, THE GUT MICROBIOME & THE REST OF THE BODY

 

(Source: fatburningman.com)

 

Christian John Lillis, of the Peggy Lillis Foundation, sent this text to me yesterday:

At a talk by Bruce Hirsch on FMT and he just said, referring to antibiotics, “What happens in the gut doesn’t stay in the gut.” I thought that was well put.

–   Christian John Lillis on 3/9/2016

Well put indeed! Dr Hirsch succinctly summed up, in one short sentence, antibiotics’ huge, deleterious impact on the probiotic bacteria living in our gut microbes … and from there to the rest of  the body. Wreck your gut microbiome and you’re wrecking your health.

 

Bruce E. Hirsch, MD

Specialist in Infectious Disease & Geriatric Medicine

dr-bruce-e-hirsch-md-11308126

 

If you wish to read more about Dr Hirsch and fecal-derived microbiota transfers (FMT) for recurring Clostridium difficile infections, see: After Antibiotics, the Feces Pill Remains (Khazan, 2013) and Effectiveness of fecal-derived microbiota transfer using orally administered capsules for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (Hirsch et al, 2015).

 

 

About the Peggy Lillis Foundation:
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The mission of the Peggy Lillis Foundation is to build a nationwide clostridium difficile awareness movement by educating the public, empowering advocates, and shaping policy.
The PLF envisions a world where C. diff is rare, treatable and survivable.

 

What is Clostridium difficile infection?

“Clostridium difficile [pronounced Klo-STRID-ee-um dif-uh-SEEL], also known as “C. diff” [See-dif], is a germ that can cause diarrhea. Most cases of C. diff infection occur in patients taking antibiotics. The most common symptoms of a C. diff infection include:

  • Watery diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Belly pain and tenderness “
– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015

 

 

 

probiotics-vs-antibiotics

 

 

REFERENCES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015).  Clostridium difficile Infection Information for Patients. See: http://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cdiff/Cdiff-patient.html

Hirsch et al. (2015). Effectiveness of fecal-derived microbiota transfer using orally administered capsules for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. BMC Infectious Diseases, 15:191. See: http://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-015-0930-z

Khazan, O. (2013). After Antibiotics, the Feces Pill Remains. The Atlantic. See: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/12/after-antibiotics-the-feces-pill-remains/281925/

Lillis, C.J. (3/9/2016). Personal communication.

Peggy Lillis Foundation. (2016). See: http://peggyfoundation.org

 

 

© Copyright 2016. Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.