Tag Archives: ADD

Food Additives and Hyperactivity in Children

 

 

(Source: www.healthy-holistic-living.com)
(Source: www.healthy-holistic-living.com)

 

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved OVER 70,000 FOOD ADDITIVES  –  from artificial ingredients to genetically modified ones, and from all natural to GRAS (generally recognized as safe). The situation is even worse with cosmetics and personal care products, with virtually no regulations on chemicals. Our skin absorbs whatever we put on it so those chemicals get into our bodies, where many of them do harm. (HealthyHolisticLiving.com, 2014)
Does this alarm you?

 

 

 

Europe Bans Food Dyes due to ADHD & Cancer Links. (Source: csglobe.com)
Europe Bans Food Dyes due to ADHD & Cancer Links – US FDA Continues to Allow Them. (Source: csglobe.com)

 

 

When British researchers removed food additives from the diets of a group of hyperactive 3-year-olds, the children calmed down. When artificial food colorings and preservatives were introduced back into the children’s diets, their parents reported an increase in hyperactivity. Researchers estimate that if children were to eat additive-free, the number of them thought to have hyperactivity-related behavioral problems could be greatly reduced.  (PureVolume.com, 2014)

 

 

 

 

THE US FDA’S LAX REGULATION OF FOOD ADDITIVES (AllGov.com, 2014) (Thompson, 2013)

 

 

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The Natural Resources Defense Council (NDRC) reviewed the food safety protection system managed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and concluded that Americans are consuming food laced with unsafe chemicals due to our federal government’s ongoing failure to oversee and adequately regulate food producers.

“Rules governing the chemicals that go into a tennis racket are more stringent than (rules for) the chemicals that go into our food. At least when you put a new chemical on the market, you have to notify the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). But there’s no requirement that you notify the FDA when you make a new food additive.”

– Thomas Nelter, J.D., Director of the Pew Charitable Trust’s Food Additives Project

Mr Nelter is a Chemical Engineer, an Attorney, a Healthy Homes specialist, and a Fellow of the Institute of Hazardous Materials Management.

 

 

Thomas Nelter, Head of the Pew Charitable Trust (Source: iflr.foodlaw.org)
Thomas Nelter, Director of the Pew Charitable Trust’s Food Additives Project.  (Source: iflr.foodlaw.org)
Nelter’s project studied conflict of interest issues in food safety evaluations and found that, between 1997-2012, employees of food additive manufacturers wrote 1 of every 5 safety determinations the industry submitted to the US FDA.
Another 12% of the safety determinations were paid for by a consulting firm selected by the manufacturer. The rest of the safety reviews were conducted by expert panels chosen either by the manufacturer or by a consultant to the manufacturer.
According to an article published in the respected journal JAMA Internal Medicine, another 13% of the determinations were written by someone working for a consulting firm selected by the manufacturer and the remainder of the reviews were conducted by expert panels selected either by the manufacturer or a consultant to the manufacturer.
Hmm, this does not seem like a good way to protect the public
The Pew study employed conflict of interest criteria developed by a committee of the Institute of Medicine to analyze 451generally recognized as safe, or GRAS, determinations that the food industry submitted to the US FDA over a 25 year period.
The Food Additives Amendment of 1958 authorizes MANUFACTURERS to make determinations of an additive’s safety (GRAS determinations) but doesn’t require them to notify the FDA about these determinations.

 

Really?
Really?

 

 

 

 

 

FOOD DYES, ADHD, CANCER AND ALLERGIES (Curran, 2010)

So many vibrantly colored products – I hesitate to call them foods – are available in the processed foods aisles we may not give their colors a second thought – yet we should because the FDA-approved food dyes used to achieve those colors present profound risks to our health. The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI)  published FOOD DYES; A RAINBOW OF RISKS, a comprehensive scientific report detailing the risks from nine dyes widely used in food products. The report was compiled by Molecular Toxicologist Sarah Kobylewski and Michael Jacobson, Executive Director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
This report presents considerable evidence for risks of cancer, hyperactivity in children and allergies posed by food dyes.
THE US FOOD INDUSTRY POURS INTO OUR FOOD SUPPLY OVER 15 MILLION POUNDS OF THE NINE STUDIED DYES – PER YEAR. Three of these dyes contain known carcinogens. Four can cause serious allergic reactions. Other studies have found that seven of the nine contributed to cancer development in lab animals, including brain and testicular tumors, colon cancer, and mutations.

 

CSPI’s Executive Director, Michael F. Jacobson, said, “These synthetic chemicals do absolutely nothing to improve the nutritional quality or safety of foods, but trigger behavior problems in children and, possibly, cancer in anybody.”
An Associate at the National Toxicology Program, James Huff,  commented, “Some dyes have caused cancers in animals, contain cancer-causing contaminants, or have been inadequately tested for cancer or other problems. Their continued use presents unnecessary risks to humans, especially young children. It’s disappointing that the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration] has not addressed the toxic threat posed by food dyes.”
A letter CSPI mailed to the FDA detailed reasons for banning food dyes in the US. to protect consumers.  CSPI charged that the FDA fails to enforce the law in the following ways:
  • Red 3 and Citrus Red 2 should be banned under the Delaney amendment, because they caused cancer in rats (some uses were banned in 1990), as should Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6, which are tainted with cancer-causing contaminants.
  • Evidence suggests, though does not prove, that Blue 1, Blue 2, Green 3, Red 40 and Yellow 6 cause cancer in animals. There is certainly not “convincing evidence” of safety.
  • Dyed foods should be considered adulterated under the law, because the dyes make a food “appear better or of greater value than it is” – typically by masking the absence of fruit, vegetable or other more costly ingredient.”
CSPI charged that the FDA has been aware of  the health risks posed by these dyes but has not acted to protect consumers.
As of 2010, when the CSPI report was issued, over 200,000 pounds of Red 3 was added to  processed food products each year, including ConAgra’s Kid Cuisine frozen meals and Betty Crocker’s Fruit Roll-Ups. (I don’t know the statistics for the years after 2010.)
If food manufacturers wish to attract consumers with food colors, they have choices other than synthetic, petroleum-based dyes: Blueberry juice concentrate, carrot juice, paprika, grape skin extract, beet juice, purple sweet potato, corn, and red cabbage are just a few of the many non-chemical dyes available – and used in other countries.
Fanta Orange Soda manufactured in Britain is colored with pumpkin and carrot extract while the US version is dyed with Red 40 and Yellow 6. Kellogg Strawberry NutriGrain Bars are colored with Red 40, Yellow 6 and Blue 1 in the US but with beetroot, annatto and paprika extract in Britain. McDonald’s Strawberry Sundaes are colored Red dye 40 in America but with strawberries in Britain.
American consumer advocacy groups have called on the FDA to enact similar policies in the this country.
A British law went into effect on July 20th 2010 requiring companies to put this notice on each dyed product sold in Europe:  “May have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children.”

 

 

 

 

IS OUR FDA TRULY PROTECTING US?

 

(Source; www.change.org)
(Source; www.change.org)
The images below show coloring agents used in Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain bars made in the US vs in Britain.  In Britain, lawmakers believe potentially harmful ingredients should be banned from foods until they’re proven safe. In the US, our FDA takes the position that these ingredients can be left in until they have been proven to be harmful. From my research, it seems even when they’ve been scientifically determined to be harmful, the FDA often refuses to ban them. GMO foods are a case in point.
(Source: www.drfranklipman.com)
(Source: www.drfranklipman.com)

 

 

 

 

 

NINE FOOD ADDITIVES ASSOCIATED WITH HYPERACTIVITY

 

Here’s a list of nine food additives that could aggravate attention problems (Gardner, 2014):

 

BLUE NO.1: A food coloring (AKA Brilliant Blue)

Found in:

Frito-Lay Sun Chips French Onion and other Frito-Lay products; some Yoplait products; some JELL-O dessert products; Fruity Cheerios; Trix; Froot-Loops; Apple Jacks; Quaker Cap’N Crunch’s Crunch Berries; some Pop-Tarts products; some Oscar Mayer Lunchables; Duncan Hines Whipped Frosting Chocolate; Edy’s ice cream products; Skittles candies; Jolly Ranchers Screaming Sours Soft & Chew Candy; Eclipse gum; Fanta Grape

Some products containing FDA-approved Blue 1
Some products containing FDA-approved Blue No. 1

 

 

 

Blue No. 2: A food coloring (AKA Indigotine)

Found in:
Froot-Loops; Post Fruity Pebbles; Pop-Tarts products; Duncan Hines Moist Deluxe Strawberry Supreme Premium Cake Mix; Betty Crocker Frosting Rich & Creamy Cherry; M&M’s Milk Chocolate Candies; M&M’s Milk Chocolate Peanut Candies; Wonka Nerds Grape/Strawberry; pet foods

 

Some food products containing FDA-approved Blue No. 2
Some food products containing FDA-approved Blue No. 2

 

 

 

Green No.3: A food coloring, rarely used now

Found in:

Candy, beverages, ice cream, puddings

 

Example of food product containing FDA-approved Green No. 3
Example of food product containing FDA-approved Green No. 3

 

 

 

Orange B: A food coloring that used to added to sausage casings

 

FDA-approved Orange B in sausage casings
FDA-approved Orange B in sausage casings

Red No.3: A food coloring (AKA Carmoisine)

Found in:

Candy, cake icing, chewing gum

 

Examples of food products containing FDA-approved Red No. 3
Examples of food products containing FDA-approved Red No. 3

 

 

Sodium Benzoate: A food preservative

Found in:

Fruit juice, carbonated beverages, and pickles

Sodium benzoate is found in abundance in acidic foods. It is used to retard the growth of microorganisms, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI).

 

Examples of foods containing FDA-approved sodium benzoate
Examples of foods containing FDA-approved sodium benzoate

 

 

Red No. 40: A food coloring (AKA Allura Red)

This food dye is the most widely used food dye in the US, exceeding both Yellow No. 5 and Yellow No. 6.

Found in:

Some Frito-Lay products; some Yoplait products; JELL-O Gelatin desserts; Quaker Instant Oatmeal; Trix; Froot-Loops; Apple Jacks; some Pop-Tart products; Kid Cuisine Kung Fu Panda products; Oscar Mayer Lunchables products; Hostess Twinkies; some Pillsbury rolls and frostings; some Betty Crocker and Duncan Hines frostings; and more

 

Some food products containing FDA-approved food dye Red No. 40
Some food products containing FDA-approved food dye Red No. 40

 

 

 

Yellow No.5: A food coloring (AKA Tartrazine)

Yellow No. 5 is the only food dye that has been tested by itself, not as part of a mix of food dyes. These studies found a link to hyperactivity.

It is the second most commonly used food dye in the US.

Found in:

Nabisco Cheese Nips Four Cheese; Frito-Lay Sun Chips Harvest Cheddar and other Frito-Lay products; some Hunt’s Snack Pack Pudding products; Lucky Charms; Eggo waffles and other waffle products; some Pop-Tarts products; various Kraft macaroni and cheese products; Betty Crocker Hamburger Helper and other products

 

Some food products containing FDA-approved food dye Yellow No. 5
Some food products containing FDA-approved food dye Yellow No. 5

Yellow No.6: A food coloring (AKA Sunset Yellow)

This is the third most widely used food dye in the US.

Found in:

Frito-Lay Cheetos Flamin’ Hot Crunchy and other Frito-Lay products; Betty Crocker Fruit Roll-ups; some JELL-O gelatin deserts and instant puddings; Fruity Cheerios; Trix; some Eggo waffle products; some Kid Cuisine Kung Fu Panda products; some Kraft macaroni and cheese dinners; some Betty Crocker frostings; some M&M’s and Skittles candies; Sunkist Orange Soda; Fanta Orange

 

 

Examples of food products containing FDA-approved food dye Yellow No. 6
Examples of food products containing FDA-approved food dye Yellow No. 6

 

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF FDA-APPROVED DYES USED IN FOOD PRODUCTS

 

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The Food and Health program at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) has made an extensive investigation into what’s in our food.
You can use their comprehensive IATP Brain Food Selector: A Listing of Foods and the Food Coloring they Contain to find which artificial dyes are in your child’s (and your) favorite foods.
The chart is prefaced by this information:

Synthetic food dyes, made from petrochemicals, are common in manufactured foods that are widely consumed by children. Strong science implicates food dyes with increased hyperactivity in children. That research led the British government to ask companies to stop using most dyes by December 2009. And beginning in July 2010 most dyed foods marketed throughout the European Union are required to bear a warning notice. The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSIP) has petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban most food dyes in the United States. More recently, CSPI published a report, Rainbow of Risks, that discusses risks of cancer, genetic damage, and allergic reactions due to dyes.

Use IATP’s Brain Food Selector to find the dyes in your child’s (and your) favorite foods.

Note that Citrus Red 2 is approved only for use on the skins of oranges not used in processing, but consumers are almost never told of its presence. Orange B is permitted on sausage casings, but has not been used for years.

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Also see the IATP’s Food and Health Program’s Smart Guide to Food Dyes: Buying Foods That Can Help Learning for information on health concerns posed by artificial food dyes for children and what to buy instead.
If you’re looking for citations of scientific studies, be sure to see Appendix One  on page 4 of the Smart Guide to Food Dyes (described just above) for a table of health concerns found to be caused by specific FD&C food dyes and citations of the specific research studies reporting these findings.

 

 

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“The approach for your child’s overall health and nutrition is a diet that limits sugary and processed foods and is rich in fruits; vegetables; grains; and healthy fats, such as Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish, flaxseeds and other foods.”

– John E. Huxsahl, MD (MayoClinic.org, 2011)

 

 

 

 

(Source: thesensitivelife.weebly.com)

 

 

 

REFERENCES

AllGov.com (2014). Loopholes and Weak Enforcement Lead to Unapproved Chemicals Added to Foods. See:  http://www.allgov.com/news/controversies/loopholes-and-weak-enforcement-lead-to-unapproved-chemicals-added-to-foods-140409?news=852876

Center for Science in the Public Interest. (undated). IATP Brain Food Selector: A Listing of Foods and the Food Coloring They Contain. See:  http://brainfoodselector.iatp.org/

Curran, L. (2010).  Food Dyes Linked to Cancer, ADHD, Allergies. FOOD SAFETY NEWS. See:  http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/07/popular-food-dyes-linked-to-cancer-adhd-and-allergies/#.VDAh7ildXF8

Gardner, A. (2014). 9 Food Additives That May Affect ADHD. Health.com. See: http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20439038_2,00.html

HealthyHolisticLiving.com. (2014). 70,000 food additives approved by the FDA – What you don’t know will hurt you. See:  http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/70000-food-additives-approved-fda-dont-know-will-hurt.html

Huxsahl, J.E. (2011). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children: What does the research say about the relationship between food additives and ADHD? MayoClinic.org. See: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/adhd/expert-answers/adhd/faq-20058203

IATP’s Food and Health Program. (2009).  Smart GuideTo Food Dyes: Buying foods that can help learning. See:  http://www.iatp.org/files/421_2_105204.pdf

Kolylewski, S. & Jacobson, M. (2010). Food Dyes: A Rainbow of Risks (pdf.  See: http://cspinet.org/new/pdf/food-dyes-rainbow-of-risks.pdf

PureVolume.com. (2014). Industry Influence Found In Food Additive Reports. See:  http://www.purevolume.com/hubbardkpxf/posts/4625907/Industry+Influence+Found+In+Food+Additive+Reports

Thompson, D. (2013). Food Additive Safety Often Determined by Those With Food Industry Ties: Study. HealthDay.com. See:  http://consumer.healthday.com/public-health-information-30/ethics-health-news-747/safety-of-many-food-additives-determined-by-those-with-conflicts-of-interest-study-679010.html

 

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 

© Copyright 2013-2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

Omega-3 versus Omega-6 Fatty Acids

 

 

omega3-vs-omega6

 

 

The story of Omega-3 versus Omega-6 fatty acids for our health stated in its simplest form (Gunnars, 2014):

  • A diet low in Omega-3s but high in Omega-6 but low in Omega-3 produces excessive inflammation.
  • A diet that includes a balanced amount of each reduces inflammation.
  • People eating the Standard American Diet (SAD) are consuming a much higher level of Omega-6s relative to Omega-3s and the excessive inflammation resulting from this imbalance causes a whole range of serious health problems – including heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, arthritis, Alzheimers, many types of cancers, and others.
  • Metabolic Syndrome: Conditions occurring together (high blood pressure, high blood sugar level, excess fat around the waist, abnormal cholesterol levels) that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

 


Both Omega-6 and Omega-3 essential fatty acids are poly-unsaturated types of oils the human body doesn’t have the enzymes to produce for itself so we must get them from our diets or supplements.
These types of fatty acids differ from most other fats in that they are not simply used for energy. They are biologically active, playing essential roles in processes such as blood clotting and inflammation.
Without both Omega-3s and Omega-6s in proper ratio, we are highly likely to become sick.

 

 

 

(Source:  cornerstonewellnessmd.com)
EFFECTS OF OMEGA-3 DEFICIENCY  (Source: cornerstonewellnessmd.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

BENEFITS OF OMEGA-3 ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS (Watson, 2014)

 

Omega-3 essential fatty acids support heart, brain and mental health; reduce cancer risk and help cancer patients recover; help prevent and ease arthritis; reduce the risk of eye problems; and keep the skin and scalp healthy.

 

 

(Source:  www.drsinatra.com)
Omega-3s and Heart Health. (Source: www.drsinatra.com)
OMEGA-3s FOR HEART HEALTH
  1. Help lower cholesterol levels
  2. Reduce triglycerides (unhealthy fats in the blood) by as much as 30%. High triglyceride levels are linked to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.
  3. Decrease the risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats) which can lead to sudden death
  4. Can help prevent blood clots from forming, breaking off and blocking an artery to the heart (causing a heart attack) or an artery to the brain (causing a stroke
  5. Can slightly lower blood pressure – high blood pressure is another risk factor for heart disease.
  6. Reduce inflammation all over the body, helping prevent blocked arteries.
  7. Prevent the re-narrowing (re-stenosis) of coronary arteries after angioplasty surgery.

 

 

 

 

(Source:  omega3foods.arccfn.org.au)
(Source: omega3foods.arccfn.org.au)

 

 

OMEGA-3 AND CANCER
  1. Fish oils, high in Omega-3 fatty acids, have been found to suppress the grown of certain types of cancers in animals.
  2. May reduce the risk of hormone-fueled cancers such as breast cancer
  3. May inhibit the growth of lung, prostate and colorectal cancers.
  4. May help cancer patients survive their disease
  5. Since there is a known link between excessive inflammation in the body and the development of certain cancers, Omega-3s likely reduce the risk of developing all cancers.

 

 

 

 

 

Omega-3 is a crucial nutrient for the brain and for good mental health. Countries where people eat more fish have fewer cases of depression. (Source:  www.wileysfinest.com)
Omega-3 fatty acid is a crucial nutrient for the brain and for good mental health. Countries where people eat more fish report fewer cases of depression. (Source: www.wileysfinest.com)

 

 

OMEGA-3 AND MENTAL HEALTH
  1. Omega-3 fatty acids promote blood flow in the brain and are essential for brain health.
  2. People getting insufficient Omega-3s in their diet are at increased risk of developing dementia, depression, ADD, dyslexia and schizophrenia.
  3. Omega-3s keep the synapses (tiny gaps across which nerve impulses must pass) in the brain working properly. Nerve impulses need to get through the membrane surrounding the neurons in the brain – and the cell membranes are made mostly of fats, including Omega-3s.
  4. Omega-3 fatty acids improve learning and memory.
  5. They improve mood in people who are depressed.
  6. They fight age-related cognitive decline due to dementia.
  7. Infants require DHA so their brains develop properly, especially during the first two years of life.
  8. A study found that babies born to mother with higher DHA blood levels scored higher on tests of attention and learning than those whose mothers had lower DHA levels.
  9. Another study found that children of mothers who had taken fish oil supplements during pregnancy had higher IQs than the children of mothers who took a placebo.

 

 

 

 

Cauliflower for Arthritis: A cup of cauliflower contains 0.2 grams of Omega-3s - 8% of the recommended daily value.  (Source: www.arthritis-health.com)
Roasted Cauliflower for Arthritis: A cup of cauliflower contains 0.2 grams of Omega-3s – 8% of the recommended daily value. (Source:  www.arthritis-health.com)

 

OMEGA-3 AND ARTHRITIS
  1. Arthritis is the result of the immune system’s autoimmune (abnormal) response to the body’s own joints – as if they were infectious agents, foreign invaders needing to be destroyed. The resulting inflammation produces swollen, stiff, painful joints.
  2. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation throughout the body.
  3. The body also converts Omega-3s to even more potent anti-inflammatory compounds such as resolvins (a family of bioactive products).
  4. Arthritic patients taking Omega-3s have been able to reduce – or even stop – using corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

 

 

 

Foods containing Omega-3 fatty acids (including salmon, flax seeds, and walnuts)  have been known to give skin an almost instant glow.
Foods containing Omega-3 fatty acids (including salmon, flax seeds, and walnuts) have been known to give skin an almost instant glow.
OMEGA-3 AND THE SKIN
  1. Omega-3 fatty acids, especially eisosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are essential for healthy skin and hair. EPA helps regulate oil production, keeping the skin hydrated.
  2. Omega-3s protect the skin from damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation  from the sun. UV exposure produces harmful substances called free radicals, which damage cells and can lead to premature aging and cancer. Omega-3s act as an antioxidant protecting the body from these free radicals.
  3. Omega-3s also help repair skin damage by preventing the release of enzymes that destroy collagen.
  4. Research suggests that Omega-3’s help prevent certain types of skin cancer.
  5. The anti-inflammatory properties of Omega-3s help relieve  autoimmune responses expressed through the skin – such as rosacea, psoriasis and eczema.
  6. Insufficient Omega-3 levels can cause the scalp to get dry and flaky (dandruff) and the hair to lose its luster.
  7. Omega-3s can also be given to pets to improve their skin and coat health.

 

 

 

“Omega-3 fatty acids are most important, as they bring balance to our hormones, reduce inflammation, regulate our blood sugar, prevent blood clotting, keep our cholesterol and triglycerides in balance, relax our blood vessels, and and make our cells healthy and resilient.”
– The Natural Hormone Makeover by Phuli Cohan

 

 

(Source: www.allaboutvision.com)
(Source: www.allaboutvision.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 TYPES OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS FOUND IN NATURE
The principal Omega-3 essential fatty acids (EFA’s) are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid ( DHA), primarily found in certain fish. α-Linolenic acid (ALA), another Omega-3 fatty acid, is found in plants such as nuts and seeds.
Wikipedia’s entry for Omega-3 fatty acid lists these as the most common Omega-3 fatty acids found in nature (Wikipedia, 8/28/2014):

Hexadecatrienoic acid (HTA)
α-Linolenic acid (ALA)
Stearidonic acid (SDA)
Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE)
Eicosatetraenoic acid (ETA)
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)
Heneicosapentaenoic acid (HPA)
Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), Clupanodonic acid
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)
Tetracosapentaenoic acid
Tetracosahexaenoic acid (Nisinic acid)

 

 

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FOODS NATURALLY HIGH IN OMEGA-3 ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS

 

 

Food Sources of Omega-3's
Food Sources of Omega-3’s

 

 

Foods high in Omega-3s are naturally delicious to the palate.
Foods Rich in Omega-3s:
SEAFOOD:
  • Halibut
  • Herring
  • Mackerel
  • Oysters
  • Salmon
  • Sardines
  • Trout
  • Tuna(fresh)

 

FRESH PRODUCE CONTAINING ALA OMEGA-3s:

Vegetables, especially green leafy ones, are rich in ALA, a form of Omega-3 fatty acids. Although ALA isn’t as powerful as the other Omega-3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA, these vegetables also have fiber and other nutrients, as well as Omega-3s.

  • Brussels sprouts
  • Kale
  • Mint
  • Parsley
  • Spinach
  • Watercress

 

OILS CONTAINING ALA OMEGA-3s:
  • Canola oil
  • Cod liver oil
  • Flaxseed oil
  • Mustard oil
  • Soybean oil
  • Walnut oil
Here are some charts to help you make good choices.

 

(Source: www.cancercoachchris.com)
(Source: www.cancercoachchris.com)

 

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SOURCES OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS:  ALA , EPA and DHA are most common Omega-3 fatty acids, generally found in sea food.   (Source:  chemistry.tutorvista.com)
SOURCES OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS:
ALA , EPA and DHA are most common Omega-3 fatty acids, generally found in sea food. (Source: chemistry.tutorvista.com)

 

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9 FOODS RICH IN OMEGA-3s  Foods that are rich in Omega-3 fats, fiber and antioxidants top the list of foods to include in your diet.  (Source:  mollymorgan-nutritionexpert.blogspot)
9 FOODS RICH IN OMEGA-3s
Foods that are rich in Omega-3 fats, fiber and antioxidants top the list of foods to include in your diet. (Source: mollymorgan-nutritionexpert.blogspot)

 

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A list of seafood containing Omega-3's: Seafood sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. (Source:  www.1vigor.com)
Seafood sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. (Source: www.1vigor.com)

 

 

You can check out the Omega-3 foods you commonly eat on SELFNutritionData’s comprehensive list of the FOODS HIGHEST IN TOTAL OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS.  (Millen, 2014-a)

 

 

SOURCES OF OMEGA-3s FOR VEGETARIANS AND VEGANS
Vegetarians and vegans can obtain adequate levels of Omega-3s without eating fish or fish oil-based supplements.
The table below summarizes some of the basic relationships between Omega-3s and types of diet:
Diet Type ALA Food Sources EPA and DHA Food Sources
Vegan many plants sea plants; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Generally vegetarian but including fish many plants and most fish eggs, cheese, milk, and yogurt, especially when obtained from grass-fed animals but in varying amounts depending on additional factors; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Generally vegetarian but including eggs, cheese, milk and yogurt (without fish, sea plants, or meat) many plants; eggs, cheese, milk, and yogurt most fish; sea plants; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Plant-eating and meat-eating (but without fish or sea plants) many plants; many meats many meats, especially when obtained from grass-fed animals, but in varying amounts, depending on additional factors; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Source:  The George Mateljan Foundation

 

 

 

Vegetarian-Sources-of-Omega-3s

 

 

 

 

The evening primrose flower (O. biennis) produces an oil containing a high content of γ-linolenic acid, a type of Omega−6 fatty acid.
The evening primrose flower (O. biennis) produces an oil containing a high content of γ-linolenic acid, a type of Omega−6 fatty acid.

 

 

OMEGA-6 FATTY ACIDS

 

Elevated Omega-6 intakes are associated with an increase in ALL inflammatory diseases – which is to say virtually all diseases. The list includes – but isn’t limited to (Kresser, 2014?):

 

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Allergies
  • Cancer
  • Psychiatric Disorders
  • All Autoimmune Diseases
For more information on the role of inflammation in the development of disease, see INFLAMMATION.  For a list of  80 autoimmune and autoimmune related diseases, see AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS.

 

Four major food oils (palm, soybean, rapeseed and sunflower) provide more than 100 million metric tons annually, yielding over 32 million metric tons of Omega-6 linoleic acid (LA) and 4 million metric tons of Omega-3 alpha-linoleic acid (ALA).
Dietary sources of Omega-6 fatty acids include:
 (Wikipedia, 7/19/2014)

 

 

 

 

33 66

 

OMEGA-6 TO OMEGA-3 RATIO

A distorted ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is a hallmark of the Western diet – and one of its most damaging characteristics.  The Standard American Diet (bearing the apt acronym ‘SAD’) has us consuming huge amounts of Omega-6s and way too few Omega-3s.

 

 

Americans eat too little Omega 3 and way too much Omega 6 (Source: www.meandmydiabetes.com)

The Standard American Diet (SAD)  –  too little Omega-3 and way too much Omega-6
(Source: www.meandmydiabetes.com)

 

 

Our Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio tends to be 25 times higher than it should be. Small wonder we are ill with ailments from allergies to heart disease to cancers. (Kresser, 2014?)
Omega-6 is pro-inflammatory. Omega-3s are neutral. Diets containing a lot of Omega-6 and little Omega-3 increase inflammation. Diets containing a lot of Omega-3 and little Omega-6 reduce inflammation.
The human body requires both Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids to perform many essential functions.
Omega-6 is found mostly in plant oils such as corn, soybean, and sunflower oils as well as in nuts and seeds. The American Heart Association recommends we consume about 5-10% of our food calories from Omega-6 fatty acids.
Omega-3s come primarily from fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel as well as from walnuts and flax seeds. The American Heart Association recommends that people without coronary heart disease have at least two servings of fatty fish per week. They recommend that people with known coronary heart disease eat more, about 1 gram of EPA and DHA daily, preferably from fatty fish. (Jaret, 2014)

 

This chart shows how Omega-6 fatty acids promote inflammation in the body and how Omega-3s are anti-inflammatory. Omega-6 contains linoleic acid (LA) while Omega-3s contain alpha-linoleic acid (ALA) yielding EPA and DHA.
HOW OMEGA-3 BECOMES ANTI-INFLAMMATORY IN THE BODY & OMEGA-6 BECOMES INFLAMMATORY (Source: www.psycheducation.org)
FATTY ACID PATHWAYS IN THE BODY: How OMEGA-6 fatty acids become inflammatory in the body & OMEGA-3s become anti-inflammatory
(Source: www.psycheducation.org)
Linoleic acid (LA), the shortest-chained Omega-6, is an essential fatty acid. Arachidonic acid is a physiologically significant Omega 6, the precursor for prostaglandins (mediator cells with a variety of regulatory functions in the body), endocannabinoids (a group of neuro-modulatory lipids),
and other  physiologically active molecules.
Excess Omega-6 fatty acids from vegetable oils interfere with the health benefits of Omega-3 fats, in part because they compete for the same rate-limiting enzymes. A high proportion of Omega-6 to Omega-3 shifts the physiological state in the tissues to become pro-thrombotic,  pro-inflammatory and pro-constrictive – and hence push bodily tissues toward the development of many diseases. (Wikipedia, 7/19/14)
A chart showing the Omega-6 versus Omega-3 contents of various food oils – you can see that fish oils are the healthiest (anti-inflammatory) for us while safflower and sunflower oils are the unhealthiest (inflammatory):
To correct this ratio you can supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids or eat lots wild fish, while avoiding the polyunsaturated fatty acids that have high levels of Omega-6s. (Source: anabolicmen.com)
To correct a poor intake ratio, you can supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids or eat lots wild fish, while avoiding the polyunsaturated fatty acids that have high levels of Omega-6s.
(Source: anabolicmen.com)

 

 

The graphic below provides an inkling of how our diet is making us sick: Industrially produced eggs deliver 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3 while the ratio for range-fed eggs is much more balanced. Industrially produced beef delivers 21 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3 while the ratio for grass-fed beef is considerably better.

 

 

omega63ratios

 

Add to that the vast amounts of potato chips, French fries, micro-wave popcorn, margarine, most salad dressings, frying oils, and processed foods we consume and it’s not at all surprising that chronic, degenerative diseases pervade our culture.
You can check out the Omega-6 foods you commonly eat on SELFNutritionData’s comprehensive list of the FOODS HIGHEST IN TOTAL OMEGA-6 FATTY ACIDS.  (Millen, 2014-b)

 

 

 

(Source: www.juvenon.com)
(Source: www.juvenon.com)

 

 

 

Joseph Hibbeln, MD, a researcher studying Omega-3 and Omega-6 intake at the National Institute of Health (NIH) observed about the rising intake of Omega-6:

The increases in world linolaic acid (LA) consumption over the past century may be considered a very large uncontrolled experiment that may have contributed to increased societal burdens of aggression, depression and cardiovascular mortality.

(Kresser, 2014?)

 

 

 

 

OMEGA-3 SUPPLEMENTS

 

 

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Omega-3 supplements must be taken in a form that delivers the fatty acids in a bio-available form or your body won’t be able to get the benefits.
These are some high quality Omega-3 supplements recommended by my health care providers to augment my Omega-3 intake from foods:

 

  • Carlson’s Super Omega-3 Fish Oil Concentrate 1,000mg soft gels
            The dose for me is 1 soft gel 2x/day.

 

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  • NutraSea 2X Concentrated 1250 mg EPA + DHA
           The dose for me is 1 soft gel 3x/day.

 

ASC-00548-1

 

            This company also makes a vegan version. It’s a liquid, not a soft gel.  I don’t know the dosage.

 

 

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  • Integrative Therapeutics’  Eskimo-3 Fish Oil gel caps
The dose for me is 2 gel caps 2x/day.

integrative-therapeutics-tyler-eskimo-3-105-softgels

 

 

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In addition to omega-6 fatty acids, most polyunsaturated oils are highly prone to oxidation and rancidity, which turns these so-called ‘heart healthy’ oils to toxic liquids. (Source: eatdrinkpaleo.com.au)
In addition to Omega-6 fatty acids, most polyunsaturated oils are highly prone to oxidation and rancidity, which turns these so-called ‘heart healthy’ oils to toxic liquids. (Source: eatdrinkpaleo.com.au)

 

********************

 

REFERENCES

Cohan, P.  (2008). The Natural hormone Makeover: 10 Steps to Rejuvenate Your Health and Rediscover Your Inner Glow.  See: http://www.amazon.com/The-Natural-Hormone-Makeover-Rejuvenate/dp/0471744840

Gunnars, K. (2014). How to Optimize Your Omega-6 to Omega-3 Ratio. Authority Nutrition: An Evidence-Based Approach. See:  http://authoritynutrition.com/optimize-omega-6-omega-3-ratio/

Jaret, P. (2014). Understanding the Omega Fatty Acids. WebMD.  See: http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthy-kitchen-11/omega-fatty-acids

Kresser, C. (2014?). How too much omega-6 and not enough omega-3 is making us sick. See:  http://chriskresser.com/how-too-much-omega-6-and-not-enough-omega-3-is-making-us-sick

Millen, K. (2014-a). Foods Highest in Total Omega-6 Fatty Acids. SELFNutritionData.  See:  http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000140000000000000000.html

Millen, K. (2014-b). Foods Highest in Total Omega-6 Fatty Acids. SELFNutritionData. See:  http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000141000000000000000-1w.html

Watson, S. (2014). Benefits of Omega-3. How Stuff Works. See: http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/food-nutrition/facts/benefits-of-omega-31.htm

Wikipedia. (8/28/2014). Omega-3 fatty acid. See:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid#List_of_omega-3_fatty_acids

Wikipedia. (7/19/2014). Omega-6 fatty acid. See:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-6_fatty_acid

 

 

© Copyright 2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.