Tag Archives: Alzheimer’s

Light Based Treatment for Alzheimer’s?

Updated on 4/26/2017.

Light Based Therapy for Alzheimer’s

Source: PICOWER INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING AND MEMORY

 

Researchers at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have shown that a unique, non-invasive treatment involving flickering light restores disrupted gamma waves in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease.
Brain cells firing rhythmically and in sync produce waves, which are categorized by their firing frequencies. Delta waves (1.5 Hz to 4 Hz) are produced during deep sleep. Theta waves (4 Hz to 12 Hz) occur during running and deep meditation. And gamma waves (25 Hz to 100 Hz) are associated with excitement and concentration.
Changes in gamma waves in the range of 20–50 Hz have been observed in several neurological disorders. (Iaccarino, 2016). This gamma wave disruption may be a key factor in Alzheimer’s disease pathology, according to a 2016 mouse study published in Nature. The MIT researchers propose that restoration of these waves may one day also be an effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease in humans.

Continue reading Light Based Treatment for Alzheimer’s?

For a Healthy Mouth

 

Source: www.syracuseutdentistry.com)
(Source: www.syracuseutdentistry.com)

 

 

 

ORAL HEALTH AS A WINDOW TO OVERALL HEALTH

Thousands of studies have linked oral disease to systemic disease. Meaning, the health of your mouth, teeth and gums has a direct connection to health in the rest of your body. (Mercola, 8/27/2016)
Most of the billions of bacteria living in the mouth are harmless – even necessary for good health. Maintaining good oral health supports those good bacteria and enables the body’s natural defenses to keep bad bacteria under control. But, without proper oral hygiene, pathogenic bacteria can reach levels that lead to tooth decay and gum disease – and also create disease elsewhere in the body.
Additionally, medications such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics and antidepressants reduce saliva flow. Saliva helps wash away food particles and neutralize acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping protect against microbial invasion or overgrowth that could lead to disease. (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2016)
Pathogenic bacteria living in our oral cavities enter the blood stream  through a variety of daily activities, such as chewing, eating, brushing and flossing. Invasive dental treatments greatly increase the risk of pathogenic bacteria’s spreading elsewhere in the body via the blood stream. (Whiteman, 2013)

 

 

 

DISEASES LINKED TO ORAL HEALTH

Poor conditions in the mouth contribute to many problems elsewhere in the body, including:
  • Endocarditis. Endocarditis is a dangerous infection of the inner lining of the heart (the endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other pathogenic microbes from the mouth or elsewhere in the body  spread through the bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in the heart.
  • Cardiovascular disease. Research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke are linked to infections and the inflammation pathogenic oral bacteria can cause.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis (a set of inflammatory diseases affecting the tissues that surround and support the teeth) is linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Sjogren’s syndrome. Sjogren’s is an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth.
  • Diabetes. Diabetics have a  reduced resistance to infection and have more frequent and more severe gum disease.  Research has found that people with gum disease have a harder time controlling blood sugar levels and that regular periodontal care can improve diabetes control.
  • HIV/AIDS. HIV and AIDS are immunodeficiency conditions caused by the HIV virus. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis may be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss. Drugs used to treat osteoporosis carry a risk of damage to the bones of the jaw.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in the UK, discovered the presence of a bacterium called Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of patients who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s when they were alive. This bacterium is usually associated with chronic gum disease. Worsening oral health is generally seen as Alzheimer’s progresses.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. A strong link between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was found in a study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center. 70% of the RA patients had gum disease. In 30% the gum disease was severe. The population norm for gum disease is 35% with 5% having severe gum disease. Severe gum disease is often found in the early stages of RA. RA patients should get complete oral health exams regularly.
  • Head and neck cancers. A link between head and neck cancers and poor oral health at the time of oncology diagnosis has often been observed. A British group studied the oral health state of 100 people with head and neck cancers before beginning cancer treatment and found periodontal disease in 71% of the subjects who still had their teeth. The periodontal disease was severe in 51% of them. 61% of them had cavities in one or more teeth.
  • Eating disorders. Anorexia, bulimia and binge eating take their toll on oral health. Without proper nutrition, gums and other soft tissues in the mouth may bleed easily. Saliva glands may swell and cause chronic dry mouth. Repeated vomiting exposes teeth to strong stomach acid, causing lost tooth enamel and tooth edges to become thin and break off easily.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
Source: (American Dental Association, 2016), (Critchlow et al, 2014), (Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, 2015), (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2016), & (Whiteman, 2013)

 

 

(Source: www.implantnyc.com)
(Source: www.implantnyc.com)

 

 

 

 

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR ORAL HEALTH

Since the mouth is the “gateway to total body wellness” (Mercola, 8/27/2016), maintaining oral health – or restoring it if it has been compromised – is of utmost importance. Here are some suggestions for accomplishing that:

 

BRUSH YOUR TEETH PROPERLY AT LEAST TWICE A DAY
(Source: www.identalhub.com)
(Source: www.identalhub.com)

 

 

FLOSS DAILY
(Source: www.smile-la.com)
(Source: www.smile-la.com)

 

 

CONSUME A DIET CONSISTING OF REAL FOODS
A nutritious, balanced diet promotes healthy gums as well as a healthy body. In many cases, gum disease is directly connected to poor nutrition habits. Eat a well-balanced diet packed with plenty of protein, vitamins, and minerals. Vitamins C and B are both essential to healthy gums.

veg-board-with-real-food-rules1

 

 

 

SCHEDULE REGULAR DENTAL CHECKUPS AND CLEANINGS
– preferably with a biologic/holistic dentist who understands the connection between oral health and health in the rest of the body. And be sure to see your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises.

pg-scariest-dental-procedures-01-full

 

AVOID ANTIBACTERIAL MOUTHWASHES
“Your mouth is teeming with bacteria. It’s true. And it’s a good thing. There are more bacteria in your mouth than there are people on Earth. And a huge number of them actually benefit you by protecting against the more dangerous bacteria.
Bacteria“When you used an antibacterial mouthwash, it kills all kinds of bacteria, even the good ones! This can be the opportunity that the hazardous bacteria need to take over and start an infection. This is known as a “rebound effect.”
“Another side effect of bacteria loss is reduced production of nitrites (which help your blood vessels to expand and contract efficiently). A Swedish study linked lower nitrite production from antibacterial mouthwash to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.” (Blodgett, 2015)

“KILLS GERMS by up to 99.9%” for up to 12 hours – THIS IS NOT A GOOD THING

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USE AN IONIC TOOTHBRUSH
A manual or electric toothbrush mechanically removes plaque bacteria from the teeth but new studies have shown that ionic toothbrushes do a better job. Plaque biofilm is hard to brush off because it has a positive polarity while teeth have a negative polarity. Opposite charges attract and like charges repel. Much like dust is attracted to objects in our homes, plaque is attracted to our teeth.
An ionic toothbrush temporarily reverses the polarity of the tooth surfaces from negative to positive. This draws plaque towards the ionic toothbrush head, allowing the toothbrush to clear away more of it. As you use an ionic toothbrush, plaque is actively repelled by your now positively charged teeth and attracted to the negatively charged bristles – even in hard to reach areas that haven’t been touched by the brush – and acids in the mouth are neutralized. Research has found that ionic toothbrushes reduce hypersensitivity, plaque, and bleeding. (Parker, 2016)

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AVOID TOOTHPASTES CONTAINING TOXINS
Most toothpastes contain toxic ingredients – such as fluoride, parabens, sodium lauryl/laureth sulfate, triclosan, sodium hydroxide, bleaches and other harsh chemicals  These chemicals damage the body as a whole and can  impair the good probiotic bacteria in the mouth.
Switch instead to an herbal toothpaste that’s free of metals and carcinogens. Look for ingredients such as eucalyptus, licorice, neem, clove and peppermint – natural antibacterial agents and breath fresheners.
Here’s an example of an effective, healthier toothpaste:
Auromere Ayurvedic Toothpaste
Auromere toothpaste

From Auromére’s website:

Auromére ‘s highly effective line of Ayurvedic toothpaste combines the natural fibre PEELU with the astringent and invigorating properties of NEEM and 24 other barks, roots, plants and flowers which have been esteemed for centuries by Ayurvedic specialists for maintaining optimum dental hygiene. The all-natural botanical extracts and essential oils in Auromére Toothpaste are prized for their astringent, cleansing properties that help freshen breath and leave teeth feeling squeaky clean. In addition, Auromére Toothpaste contains no fluoride, gluten, artificial sweeteners, dyes or harsh chemicals commonly found in many toothpastes.

Free of fluoride, gluten, bleaches, artificial sweeteners, dyes, and animal ingredients.

Concentrated formula: Each tube lasts 3 times longer than other brands!

Available in 5 varieties: Licorice,  Freshmint,  Mint-Free,  Foam-Free Cardamom-Fennel, and Foam-Free Freshmint.

 

USE AN ORAL IRRIGATOR
Oral irrigation removes plaque that tooth brushing doesn’t reach – from below the gum line. My favorite oral irrigator, and the one recommended by holistic/biologic dentist Reid Winick, DDS,  is made by Hydrofloss. I use it at night before bedtime and can feel the difference when I’m away from it while traveling.
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USE AN ORAL PROBIOTIC
Keeping an adequate supply of good probiotic bacteria living in your mouth defends against over growths of bad  pathogenic bacteria. Using an oral probiotic lozenge after you’ve cleaned your mouth before bedtime aids in maintaining dental and periodental health, reducing the incidence of inflammation and infections.
Here are two examples of high quality oral probiotic lozenges:

EvoraPro® Oral Probiotics for Dental Professionals

(Source: ramonadental.com)
(Source: ramonadental.com)
  • A product of more than 30 years of probiotic research by industry leader ProBiora Health
  • Features a patented, proprietary, extra-strength blend of beneficial bacteria, ProBiora3®
  • The blend of beneficial bacteria in EvoraPro are ones naturally found in healthy mouths

Life Extension Florassist Oral Hygiene

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  • An oral probiotic that provides the beneficial bacteria that can help block harmful bacteria that first develop in the mouth
  • Allows the healthy and naturally occurring organisms found in the body to out-compete the harmful bacteria
  • Contains BLIS K12 and Bacillus coagulans, a unique blend of two oral probiotics
USE A TONGUE SCRAPER
A fast way to get bad bacteria out of your mouth is with a tongue scraper. This is a traditional Ayurvedic technique for removing bacterial build-up, food debris, fungi, and dead cells from the surface of the tongue. The technique cleans the mouth, freshens the breath, and also stimulates the metabolism.

(Source: www.ayurvedicbazaar.com)

(Source: www.ayurvedicbazaar.com)

 

 

 

DRINK GREEN TEA
Green tea not only protects against radiation, boosts mineralization of bones, and helps with weight loss, it also promotes healthy teeth and gums. High levels of catechin, an antioxidant, seem to be responsible for green tea’s ability to reduce inflammation in the body, including the mouth.
Source: www.pinterest.com)
Source: www.pinterest.com)

 

 

 

TRY CAMU CAMU FOR ITS HIGH VITAMIN C CONTENT
Vitamin C’s positive impact on oral health is well known.  “In fact, the use of vitamin C in dental disease is one of the earliest recorded uses of nutrient therapy in Western medicine. In 1747, a British Naval physician named James Lind noticed that lime juice, which is rich in vitamin C, helped prevent scurvy, which causes tooth loss. As a result, British sailors bottled lime juice for gum disease prevention. Incidentally, this practice later gave rise to the term ‘Limey’.” (Life Extension, 2016)
An interesting source of vitamin C is a fruit called camu camu that’s native to the Peruvian and Brazilian rain forests. It has an exceptionally high vitamin C content. Vitamin C boosts the immune system and reduces the incidence of bleeding gums, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Other benefits are repairing and maintaining cartilage and bones throughout the body and improving the texture of the skin.
Raw, Organic Camu Camu Powder
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EXPERIMENT WITH OIL PULLING
Oil pulling is a highly effective method of detoxifying the oral cavity. Swishing a tablespoon of oil (preferably organic coconut oil, but olive or sesame can also be used) around in the mouth for 10-20 minutes removes the toxins, leaving an oral environment where healthy saliva flows properly to prevent cavities and disease. Research has shown that oil pulling reduces plaque-induced gingivitis and the bacterium Streptococcus mutans, a known cause of cavities.
The first synthetic bristled toothbrush so familiar to us now first went on sale on February 24, 1938, but oil pulling has been used for centuries in India as a traditional remedy to:
  • Cure tooth decay
  • Kill bad breath
  • Heal bleeding gums
  • Prevent heart disease
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Whiten teeth
  • Soothe throat dryness
  • Prevent cavities
  • Heal cracked lips
  • Boost the Immune system
  • Improve acne
  • Strengthen the gums and jaw
See Dr Josh Axe’s Coconut Oil Pulling Benefits & How-to Guide for more information on the benefits of coconut oil pulling plus a useful how-to video.

 

(Source: draxe.com)
(Source: draxe.com)
Sources: (Axe, 2016), (Felts, 2014), (Life Extension, 2016),  (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2016), (Mercola, 8/27/2016), & (Winick, 2016)

 

 

(Source: seniorsoralhealth.org)
(Source: seniorsoralhealth.org)

 

 “Pathogens are now being recognized as resident microbes that are out of balance … (T)he same bacteria that keep us alive can have a pathogenic expression when disturbed.

“I have been tooting the horn about getting out of the ‘pesticide business.’ I’m also speaking about natural pesticides. Not just triclosan, clorhexidin and those synthetic types, but also tea tree oil, tulsi oil, oregano oil and other antimicrobial oils that … have a potent disturbing effect on the oral microbiome.

“In the mouth, you don’t want to have a ‘scorched earth policy,’ nuking all bacteria and hoping the good bugs come back … (G)ood bugs basically have a harder chance of setting up a healthy-balanced microbiome when you disturb them, denature then, or dehydrate them with alcohol-based products.”

– Biologic dentist Gerry Curatola, DDS (quoted in Mercola, 8/27/2016)

 

 

OralCare_720x160

 

“(T)housands of studies have linked oral disease to systemic disease.
‘Inflammation is known to be a disease-causing force leading to most chronic illness, and gum disease and other oral diseases produce chronic low-grade inflammation that can have a deleterious effect on every major organ system in your body.
‘Oral disease can therefore contribute to diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer’s, just to name a few. Advanced gum disease can raise your risk of a fatal heart attack up to 10 times. And, according to Curatola, if you get a heart attack related to gum disease, 9 times out of 10 it will be fatal.
‘There’s also a 700 percent higher incidence of type 2 diabetes among those with gum disease, courtesy of the inflammatory effects of unbalanced microflora in your mouth.” (Mercola, 8/27/2016

 

(Source: www.australiadental.com.au)
(Source: www.australiadental.com.au)

 

For more information on oral health, see these earlier posts:

Oral Health and Overall Health

Oral Health, Thermography and Inflammation

Is Antiseptic Mouthwash Harming Your Heart?

Vitamin C for Tooth Pain

Root Canals and Breast Cancer

For more information on how ionic toothbrushes work, see:

The Science Behind Ionic Toothbrushes

 

 

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Many thanks to Anne Mercer Larson and Morrie Sherry for suggesting I write on this topic as a follow up to my Root Canals and Breast Cancer post.

 

(Source: healthybodylife.com)
(Source: healthybodylife.com)

 

 

 

REFERENCES

American Dental Association. (2016). Eating Disorders. See: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/e/eating-disorders

Axe, J. (2016). Coconut Oil Pulling Benefits & How-to Guide. See: https://draxe.com/oil-pulling-coconut-oil/

Blodgett, K. (2015). Is Mouthwash Bad for You? Blodgett Dental Care. See: http://www.blodgettdentalcare.com/blog/is-mouthwash-bad-for-you/

Critchlow, S.B. et al. (2014). The oral health status of pre-treatment head and neck cancer patients. British Dental Journal, 1:216. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24413141

Felts, L. (2014). DETOX YOUR MOUTH: 9 HOLISTIC TREATMENTS FOR ORAL HEALTH. See: http://thechalkboardmag.com/detox-your-mouth-9-holistic-oral-health-treatments

Hardin, J.R. (3/14/2014). Is Antiseptic Mouthwash Harming Your Heart? See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/03/14/antiseptic-mouthwash-harming-heart/

Hardin, J.R. (2/16/2014). Oral Health and Overall Health.  See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/02/16/oral-health-overall-health/

Hardin, J.R. (2/16/2014). Oral Health, Thermography and Inflammation.  See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/02/16/oral-health-thermography-inflammation/

Hardin, J.R. (7/31/2016). Vitamin C for Tooth Pain. See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2016/07/31/vitamin-c-toothache/

Hardin, J.R. (8/22/2016). Root Canals & Breast Cancer. See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2016/08/22/root-canals-breast-cancer/

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center. (2015). Dental Health and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Research Update. See: http://www.hopkinsarthritis.org/arthritis-news/ra-news/dental-health-and-rheumatoid-arthritis-a-research-update/

Life Extension. (2016). Periodontitis and Cavities. See: http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/peandca.html

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2016). Oral health: A window to your overall health. See: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

Mercola, R.  (8/27/2016). For Optimal Health, Mind Your Oral Microbiome and Avoid Fluoride, Harsh Mouth Rinses and Amalgam Fillings. See: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/08/27/optimize-your-oral-microbiome-avoid-fluoride.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20160827Z1_B&et_cid=DM117251&et_rid=1638888152

Parker, K. (2016). The Science Behind Ionic Toothbrushes. See: http://www.holistic-healing-information.com/ionic-toothbrushes.html

Whiteman, H. (2013). Alzheimer’s disease linked to poor dental health. See: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264164.php

Winick, R. (2016). Five Steps You Can Take to Naturally Promote Healthy Gums and Prevent Disease. Dentistry for Health NY. See: http://www.dentistryforhealthny.com/PromoteHealth

 

 

 

© Copyright 2016. Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 

Saffron for Depression, Anxiety, OCD, Cancer, Alzheimer’s, & More

Updated 6/18/2016, 6/22/2016 & 7/2/2016..

(source: www.intercaspian.com)
(source: www.intercaspian.com)
Reading about the health properties of saffron has driven home what I’ve been learning about the differences between our woeful Western diet (often called the Standard American Diet, or SAD – how  unfortunately apt is that?) and the traditional, spice and herb rich diets of India, Persia, and other Middle Eastern cultures.
Saffron is a spice derived from the flower of the Crocus sativus, commonly known as the saffron crocus.  Saffron is so highly prized for culinary and medicinal uses, as an ingredient in perfumes and dyes, and so labor intensive to grow and harvest, it’s often referred to as ‘red gold’.
80% of the world’s saffron is grown in Iran. While there last fall, we saw beautiful heaps of saffron stigmas (called threads) for sale in the bazaars we visited – and it often appeared as an ingredient in our food. I bought some lovely saffron filaments from this spice merchant (and his son?) in the vast and beautiful Grand Bazaar in Esfahan.

 

Photo by Joan Rothchild Hardin
Photo by Joan Rothchild Hardin

 

I could happily have spent days exploring this bazaar (Qeysarriyeh Bazaar in Farsi) – and also the bazaars in other cities we visited: Hamadan, Tabriz, Zanjan, Shiraz, and Yazd! Each is different and quite wonderful in its own way.
I also saw small patches of saffron crocuses growing in the dry soil on the much trod paths in front of desert monuments such as Naqsh-e Rustam – four tombs carved into the side of a cliff embellished with intricate relief carvings. King Darius I (550-486 BCE), the builder of nearby Persepolis, is in the first tomb. The other tombs are attributed to Xerxes I, Artaxerxes I, and Darius II. Wish now I’d taken a photo of these brave little crocuses to show you.

 

To my amazement, I saw saffron crocuses growing in the dry, tamped down soil in front of the tombs at Naqsh-e-Rustam, Iran

(Source: ususmundi.info)
(Source: ususmundi.info)

 

“Saffron’s use is ancient. Saffron-based pigments have been found in 50,000 year-old paintings in northwest Iran. It conjures romance, royalty, and delicacy wherever it appears. Alexander the Great bathed in saffron to cure battle wounds. Cultivated saffron emerged in late Bronze Age Crete, bred from its wild precursor by selecting for unusually long stigmas making the plant sterile. Called Kumkum or Kesar in Ayurveda, it also appears as an important medicinal herb in many ancient texts including Ayurveda, Unani, and Chinese Medicine.” (Joyful Belly Ayurveda, 2016)
The first known mention of saffron appeared in a 7th century BCE Assyrian botanical reference. Since then, documentation of saffron’s use in the treatment of some 90 illnesses as been found. (Srivastava, 2010)

 

A detail from the “Saffron Gatherers” fresco of the “Xeste 3” building, one of many frescos depicting saffron found at the Bronze Age settlement of Akrotiri, on the Aegean island of Santorini

(Source: en.wikipedia.org)
(Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

AYURVEDIC MEDICINE

In Sanskrit, ayur means ‘life’ and veda means ‘wisdom’. The aim of Ayurveda, an ancient form of traditional medicine originating in India over 5,000 years ago, is to create a state of harmony in the body – physical balance, mental balance, and emotional balance. In Ayurveda, this understanding of health is called swastya (a Sanskrit word meaning health). Being in a state of swastya helps us live with good energy, enhances immunity, prevents the onset of ill health, and nurtures the body back into good balance if it does fall sick.
Swastya also includes the idea of being firmly established in one’s self. (Art of Living Retreat Center, 2015)
As a psychotherapist who focuses on mind-body balance, this approach makes a lot of sense to me.

 

Dhanvantari , the deity associated with Ayurveda

Godofayurveda

 

THE DOSHAS

Ayurveda sees the body as having three basic energies, called doshas
  • Vata: kinetic energy
  • Pitta: energy transformation
  • Kapha: cohesive energy
Balance among the three doshas produces swastya, a state of health.

 

(Source: www.pinterest.com)
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

 

 

 

 

 

SAFFRON IN AYURVEDIC MEDICINE

“Saffron helps pacify all three doshas. It improves immunity, increases energy, helps fight phlegm and respiratory disorders, improves vision and reduces inflammation. Its tonic can lower cholesterol, improve digestion and help treat spleen ailments, insomnia, impotency, premenstrual syndrome and neurodegenerative disorders.” (Sharma, 2016)

 

PSYCHOTROPIC MEDICATIONS FOR DEPRESSION

Modern psychopharmacology has been marketing a variety of antidepressants world wide for more than 50 years. The use of these antidepressant medications in the US has increased by 400% in the last 28 years – over 11% of Americans age 12 and older now take them. (Downey, 2013)
The Centers for Disease Control reported in 2003 that 1 in 10 adult Americans described themselves as depressed and the World Health Organization estimated that depression is expected to be the world’s second-leading cause of disability by 2020, second only to cardiovascular disease. (Swartz, 2003)
This dire situation is compounded by yet another: Taking these psychotropic medications is often accompanied by at least one of many physiological adverse side effects – anxiety, agitation, emotional numbness, suicidal thoughts, improper bone development, improper brain development, insomnia, constipation, weight gain, gastrointestinal bleeding, sexual dysfunction, and more. (Downey, 2013) & (Kresser, 2008)
Seems to me that experiencing any of these side effects would be quite depressing, especially for people who are feeling depressed to begin with.
On top of all this, taking antidepressant drugs often doesn’t resolve the original depression.

 

 

 

 

SAFFRON FOR DEPRESSION

 

(Source: stampedepanik.blogspot.com)
(Source: stampedepanik.blogspot.com)
If depression is a problem for you, you might want to look into an alternative to pharmaceutical antidepressants with their undesirable side effects and try an age old remedy from Ayurvedic Medicine:  saffron.
There is compelling scientific evidence that saffron (Crocus sativus) is as effective as some pharmaceutical antidepressants for alleviating depression – without the unpleasant side effects. And for people not wanting to give up their existing antidepressants, saffron has been found to work as a highly  effective adjunct therapy to block adverse sexual side effects.
Saffron also has been shown to treat other conditions for which antidepressants are often described – such as anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. (Downey, 2013)
Traditional Persian medicine prized saffron for relieving depression. Now 21st century research has studied saffron extract and found it produces a powerful antidepressant benefit. (Downey, 2013) & (Dharmananda, 2005)

SAFFRON FOR ANXIETY

Research findings  demonstrate that constituents in saffron known as crocins reduce anxiety without adverse reactions. (Downey, 2013)

 

(Source: www.slideshare.net)
(Source: www.slideshare.net)

 

 

 

SAFFRON FOR OCD

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are often treated with combinations of antidepressants.
Research evidence has suggested a functional interaction between the crocins found in saffron and the serotonin-neurotransmitter system, leading scientists to study the effect of saffron on OCD. In an animal model of this condition, crocin compounds from saffron substantially reduced both obsessive and compulsive symptoms without significant adverse effects. (Downey, 2013)

UNCONTROLLED EATING AND SNACKING

Neurotransmitter imbalances, particularly low levels of serotonin, have been shown to increase vulnerability to food cravings, overeating and obesity.
Appetite-suppressing medications can cause numerous, sometimes  deadly side effects—including heart valve damage, birth defects, liver injury, and increased blood pressure.
Scientists conducted a clinical trial using a saffron extract  with 60 mildly overweight female volunteers, at least half of whom suffered with compulsive snacking behavior.
Study subjects were randomly given either daily doses of 176.5 mg of patented saffron extract or a placebo. They were all instructed to maintain their normal dietary habits and all between-meal snacking was recorded.
“Over 8 weeks, the number of snacking events for the placebo group decreased by 28%. In the saffron group, between-meal snacks decreased by 55% and they reported a reduced feeling of the “need” to snack!
“After 8 weeks and without any dieting, the saffron group had lost an average of 2 pounds and reported increased energy and alertness. These small weight loss results show how its takes more than reduced snacking to achieve meaningful weight loss.”
The subjects experienced no unwanted side effects. (Downey, 2013)

 

 

 

SAFFRON FOR ASTHMA

Asthma is an autoimmune disease in which lung tissue becomes inflamed, resulting in a narrowing of the airways. Saffron reduces inflammation so helps open the airways. (Downey, 2013) & (HealthyLifeInfo.com, 2014)

 

(Source: www.salinetherapy.com)
(Source: www.salinetherapy.com)

 

SAFFRON FOR INSOMNIA

The compound safranal in saffron has been found to increase total sleep time without any negative impact on motor coordination. (Downey, 2013).

 

SAFFRON FOR CANCERS

 

(Source: www.slideshare.net)
(Source: www.slideshare.net)
Western Medicine generally treats cancers, which cause over 7.5 million deaths each year, with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation.
“Recent scientific evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, has suggested that saffron extract and its main active constituents can help inhibit carcinogenesis and tumor genesis. Rodent studies further demonstrate that saffron can reduce the serious negative effects of the anticancer drug Platinol® (cisplatin). These anticancer findings have prompted extensive current research on saffron and its components, including safranal and crocin, as promising preventive agents against cancer.” (Downey, 2013)
Saffron’s biochemical compounds zea-xanthin, lycopene, α- and β- caroteneaffron have also been shown to be helpful for cancer prevention. These compounds act as immune modulators to protect the body from cancer. (Gyanunlimited, 2016)

 

 

 

 

SAFFRON FOR ALZHEIMER’S

 

memory-1

An enormous increase in the number of people developing Alzheimer’s is expected, eventually reaching nearly 15 million within 40 years.
Doctors commonly prescribe antidepressants for Alzheimer’s patients even though the published data strongly suggest antidepressants are not helpful and often cause adverse reactions.
A double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial testing the efficacy of saffron for Alzheimer’s patients demonstrated that saffron improved both cognitive and clinical profiles after 16 weeks in subjects with mild to moderate Alzheimers – without side effects. (Downey, 2013)

 

 

MORE ABOUT SAFFRON

 

Picking saffron on in Shahn Abad village in northeast Iran

(Photo credit: BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit: BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)

 

The saffron crocus is native to Iran and Southwest Asia. It takes stigmas from 50,000 to 75,000 Crocus sativus blossoms (an acre of flowers) to make a pound of the spice. ‘Saffron’ derives from the Arabic za’faran, meaning yellow – possibly the Arabized form of the Persian word zarapan, meaning ‘golden stamens’ or ‘golden feathers’. Sumerians, Persians’ predecessors in the 3rd millennium BCE, called saffron ‘perfume of the gods’. (Batmanglij, 2011)

 

Hand separating saffron filaments from crocus flowers

(Source: www.florasaffron.com)
(Source: www.florasaffron.com)
Saffron from Crocus sativus possesses a number of medicinally important properties, such as:
  • Anti-inflammatory effect
  • Anti-convulsant effect
  • Anti-tussive effect
  • Protection against cancers (anti-genototoxic and cytotoxic effects)
  • Anti-anxiety effect
  • Relaxant property
  • Anti-depressant effect
  • Positive effect on sexual functioning
  • Improvement of memory and learning skills
  • Increased blood flow in retina and choroid (the pigmented vascular layer of the eyeball between the retina and the sclera)
  • Anti-oxidant effect to deter coronary artery disease
  • Reduction in sensitivity to painful stimuli (anti-nociceptive effects)
              – (Srivastava, 2010)
See Crocus sativus L.: A comprehensive review for additional (and thorough) information on saffron: its chemical constituents, pharmacological actions, uses, formulations, toxicity studies, and contraindications.

 

 

 

 

SAFFRON AS A NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENT

David Miller, MD, the highly knowledgeable nutritional supplements guru at LifeThyme Market on 6th Avenue in Greenwich Village (NYC), recommends this  (and only this) version of saffron:

 

(Source: www.lifeextension.com)
(Source: www.lifeextension.com)

 

Life Extension Optimized Saffron with Satiereal, Veggie Caps: 1 capsule/day for 6 weeks. Take after your largest meal OR the meal containing the most fat. (Miller, 6/7/2016)
NOTE ADDED ON 6/22/2016:
I had time to stop by LifeThyme yesterday and have another talk with Dr Miller about this saffron supplement. This is what he said:
It’s OK to take saffron longer than 6 weeks. In fact, it can be taken long term if it works for you. If you start taking 1 capsule/day and want to increase to 2 capsules/day, that’s OK.  The reason he’d said to take it for six weeks is that six weeks is, as with antidepressants, usually long enough to tell whether it’s working and he wanted my patient to let him know at that point how she’s doing on the saffron supplement.
If it’s not working by six weeks and you’re otherwise doing OK on it, take for another few weeks. As with antidepressants, it can take longer than six weeks for some people to feel a therapeutic effect. Saffron works for mood much like an SSRI – but without the side effects of  pharmaceuticals. (MILLER, 6/21/2016)

 

 

 

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE INFORMATION ON SAFFRON RESEARCH TO DATE

 

imgres-1

 

 

For comprehensive information compiled by Examine.com on findings from saffron research to date, see Summary: All Essential Benefits/Effects/Facts & Information. (Examine.com, 2016)
It would be wise to inform yourself more fully by taking a look at this article before starting on saffron.

 

HOW AYURVEDA AND FOOD AS MEDICINE CAME TO BE REPLACED BY WESTERN MEDICINE AND PHARMACEUTICALS

After 5,000 years of Ayurvedic practice in India and Sri Lanka, Ayurveda was viewed as ‘primitive’ by the British when the subcontinent became a colony of great Britain and was supplanted by Western Medicine during the British Raj between 1858-1947. After India regained its independence from Britain in 1948, Ayurvedic medicine enjoyed something of a renaissance there but Western Medicine and its approach of reducing symptoms went on to be considered the gold standard around the world while Ayurveda was looked down upon as an ‘alternative’ approach – unsophisticated and inferior.
(Source: medilifeayurveda.com)
(Source: medilifeayurveda.com)
Here’s a brief video on the history of Ayurveda with its emphasis on achieving and maintaining balanced health and how it came to be replaced by Western Medicine with its focus on reducing symptoms of disease and neglect of how to achieve health.
I don’t know about you, but it seems to me that the Developed World’s looking down on traditional healing techniques is pure hubris. We’re the ones hell bent on destroying our own health along with the health of the entire planet. Maybe ‘primitive’ knowledge offers us something we desperately need.
“HEALTH IS NOT THE MERE ABSENCE OF DISEASE. IT IS THE DYNAMIC EXPRESSION OF LIFE.”
– Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Founder of Sri Sri Ayurveda

 

 

100-pure-premium-saffron-extract-satiereal-saffron-extract-natural-appetite-suppressant-60-capsules-one-month-supply_652010_500-1

 

 

ADDED ON 7/2/2016

FOR THOSE WANTING MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SATIEREAL SAFFRON

 I asked Dr David Miller why it was only the satiereal form of saffron he recommends so he sent me the following articles to explain.  
See pages 64-71 in the current issue of Herbalgram (Journal of the American Botanical Council) for this article about saffron: Saffron: The Salubrious Spice – Emerging Research Suggests Numerous Health Benefits. (Woolven & Snider, 2016). 
And see Satiereal: Women Taking Satiereal Report Decreased Hunger. (PLT Health Solutions, undated).

 

 

(Source: www.pinterest.com)
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

 

 

 

REFERENCES

Art of Living Retreat Center. (2015). Ayurveda 101: The Aim of Ayurveda. See: https://artoflivingretreatcenter.org/8-limbs-ayurveda-aim-of-ayurveda/?keyword=ayurvedic&campaignid=339107161&adgroupid=22739666521&feeditemid=&cname=&targetid=kwd-13050861&gclid=CKbi3armrc0CFVclgQodPtMEmw

Batmanglij, N. (2011). Food of Life: Ancient Persian and Modern Iranian Cooking and Ceremonies. See: https://www.amazon.com/Food-Life-Ancient-Persian-Ceremonies/dp/193382347X

Dharmananda, S. (2005). Saffron: An Anti-Depressant Herb.  See http://www.itmonline.org/articles/saffron/saffron/htm

Downey, M. (2013). A Safer Alternative for Managing Depression. Life Extension Magazine. See: http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2013/7/a-safer-alternative-for-managing-depression/page-01

Examine.com. (2016). SAFFRON – Summary: All Essential Benefits/Effects/Facts & Information. See: https://examine.com/supplements/saffron/

Gyanunlimited. (2016). 31 Surprising Health Benefits of Zafaran (Saffron). See: http://www.gyanunlimited.com/health/31-surprising-health-benefits-of-zafaran-saffron/9146/

HealthyLifeInfo.com. (2014). Saffron Health Benefits. See: http://www.diethealthclub.com/health-food/health-benefits-of-saffron.html

Herb Wisdom. (2016). Saffron (Crocus Sativus). See: http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-saffron.html

Joyful Belly Ayurveda. (2016). Saffron. See: http://www.joyfulbelly.com/Ayurveda/ingredient/Saffron/52

Kresser, C. (2008). The dark side of antidepressants. See: https://chriskresser.com/the-dark-side-of-antidepressants/

Miller, D. (6/7/2016). Personal communication.

Miller, D. (6/21/2016). Personal communication.

Petri, O. (2008). History of Ayurveda. (Video). See: https://youtu.be/l2Zw-vYn270

PLT Health Solutions. (undated). Satiereal. Women Taking Satiereal Report Decreased Hunger. See: http://www.plthealth.com/sites/plthomas.com/files/ckfinder/userfilesfiles/SATIEREAL%20Product%20Sheet_2016.pdf

Sharma, K. (2016). Saffron Benefits: Ayurveda’s Golden Spice. See: http://www.curejoy.com/content/saffron-ayurvedas-golden-spice

Srivastava, R. et al. (2010). Crocus sativus L.: A comprehensive review. Pharmacognosy Review, 4:8, 200–208. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249922/

Swartz, H.A. & Rollman, B.L. (2003). Managing the global burden of depression: lessons from the developing world. World Psychiatry. 2003, 2:3, 162-3. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1525095/

Woolven, L. & Snider, T. (2016). Saffron: The Salubrious Spice – Emerging Research Suggests Numerous Health Benefits. Herbalgram. (Journal of the American Botanical Council), 110, 64-71. See: http://cms.herbalgram.org/herbalgram/pdfs/HG110-online.pdf

 

 

© Copyright 2016. Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Alzheimer’s & Factory Farmed Meat

 

 

Aerial View of a Factory Farm Where Animals Are Raised for Food

(Source: prairierivers.org)
(Source: prairierivers.org)

 

 

Here’s a list of the top 10 causes of death in the US. Alzheimer’s is in there at number 6 (Nichols, 2014):
  1. Heart disease
  2. Cancer
  3. Chronic lower respiratory disease
  4. Stroke
  5. Accidents
  6. Alzheimer’s disease
  7. Diabetes
  8. Influenza and pneumonia
  9. Kidney disease
  10. Suicide

 

(Source: www.lib.usf.edu)
(Source: www.lib.usf.edu)

 

 

In 2014, approximately 5.2 million Americans had Alzheimer’s disease, including about 200,000 people under 65 with early-onset Alzheimer’s.
In 2013, 15.5 million family and friends provided 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care to people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. If they’d been paid, the care they provided would be worth $220.2 billion – nearly eight times McDonald’s total revenue in 2012. (Nichols, 2014)
You’ll see in a minute how that particular comparison is especially apt.

 

(Source: nutri.com)
(Source: nutri.com)

 

Research shows a link between a pathologic protein called TDP-43 and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Lou Gehrig’s (ALS). TDP-43 protein has the same effect on the brain as infectious, toxic proteins which cause the brain degeneration seen in Mad Cow and Chronic Wasting Diseases, two types of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.
Evidence of the connection between the pathologic TDP-43 protein and Alzheimer’s include (Mercola, 2015):
  • From 25-50% of Alzheimer’s patients have evidence of TDP-43 pathology in their brains.
  • Brain autopsies of Alzheimer’s patients with evidence of TDP-43 were 10 times more likely to have suffered cognitive impairment at death than those in whom TDP-43 wasn’t present.

 

 

Mad Cow Disease  (the human version is called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease) is a form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. It is transmissible,  progressive, degenerative, and fatal to cows and humans.

(Source: www.rawfoodlife.com)
(Source: www.rawfoodlife.com)

 

Mad Cow Disease (the human version is called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, or vCJD)) is acquired from eating cattle raised in densely confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) – also referred to as factory farms. Cattle are natural herbivores but on factory farms they’re fed a diet that includes bone meal and animal byproducts made from other cows and factory farmed animals.
Mad Cow can spread rapidly and broadly when bone meal and waste products from  diseased animals  contaminate feed that’s given to thousands of other animals in different locations. (Mercola, 2015)
Scientists now think Alzheimer’s may be a slower moving version of Mad Cow Disease and the consequence of the factory farm practice of adding cannibalized  animal parts  and byproducts to the herbivores’ feed.  When humans eat the meat of animals infected with TDP-43 protein, TDP-43 can infect and damage our brains too.

 

(Source: wakingupvegan.com)
(Source: wakingupvegan.com)
The vast majority of meat we consume in the US – from cows, pigs, sheep, chickens, and turkeys – is grown on CAFOs. On these big farming operations, the animals live packed inside buildings and are fed a completely unnatural diet of genetically engineered grains (containing the pesticide glyphosate – a serious problem in its own right) mixed with antibiotics (to keep the animals from dying from the effects of the  unnatural diet they’re fed and the unsanitary conditions they live in), along with bone meal and other animal byproducts.

 

 

(Source: www.fairwarning.org)
(Source: www.fairwarning.org)

 

 

 

 

 

THE ROLE OF TDP-43 IN ALZHEIMER’S

The Mayo Clinic recently conducted an important study which demonstrated a clear connection between TDP-43 in the brain and Alzheimer’s Disease.
A description of the methodology and findings:

Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease.

In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica.

Mayo Clinic researchers studied brains of 342 patients who had died with pathologically confirmed AD and divided them into two groups based on the presence or absence of the protein TDP-43. The protein was found in 195 or 57 percent of the cases.

“We wanted to determine whether the TDP-43 protein has any independent effect on the clinical and neuroimaging features typically ascribed to AD and we found that TDP-43 had a strong effect on cognition, memory loss and medial temporal atrophy in AD,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, M.D., the study’s lead investigator and author. “In the early stages of the disease when AD pathology was less severe, the presence of TDP-43 was strongly associated with  cognitive impairment. Consequently, TDP-43 appears to play an important role in the cognitive and neuroimaging characteristics that have been linked to AD.”

The study also found that patients who suffered from greater cognitive impairment and medial temporal atrophy at the time of death had greater TDP-43 burden and had the protein in a greater number of brain regions.

“This is why we believe that TDP-43 pathology could help shed light on the phenomenon of resilient cognition in AD and explain why some patients remain clinically normal, while others do not, despite both having similar degrees of AD pathology,” says Dr. Josephs.  “Our findings suggest that in order to have AD and be cognitively resilient, TDP-43 must be absent, so it should be considered a potential therapeutic target for the future treatment of AD.

This study was funded by the US National Institute of Heath (NIA) Grants and supported by the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.

– Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic, 2014

 

Mayo Clinic Neurologist Keith Josephs, MD

(Source: intheloop.mayoclinic.org)
(Source: intheloop.mayoclinic.org)

 

Mayo Clinic neurologist Keith Josephs, MD,  the study’s lead investigator and author, describes the research and its results in this video posted to YouTube on 23 April 2014:

THE MAYO CLINIC’S TDP-43 AND ALZHEIMER’S STUDY

 

 

MAD COW DISEASE, A MAN-MADE PLAGUE

The Center for Food Safety, after the 2012 Mad Cow outbreak, noted:

Formally known as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), “Mad Cow Disease” is a persistent food safety concern in the U.S. and abroad.  BSE occurs when cattle are fed rendered meat products made from other dead, disabled or diseased cattle or sheep as a feed supplement — or when chickens are fed rendered animals and their manure is mixed into cattle feed.

Tissue from infected cows’ central nervous systems (including brain or spinal cord) is the most infectious part of a cow.  Such tissue may be found in hot dogs, taco fillings, bologna and other products containing gelatin, as well as a variety of ground or chopped meats.  People who eat meat from infected animals can contract the human version of the disease, known as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD).  The disease slowly eats holes in the brain over a matter of years, turning it sponge-like, and invariably results in dementia and death.  There is no known cure, treatment or vaccine for vCJD.

Center for Food Safety seeks to end dangerous animal feed practices that threaten human health and the safety of our meat supply, such as feeding rendered animals to other animals.  We urge the CDC to classify vCJD as a reportable disease so occurrences can be tracked and to work to plug the loopholes that still exist in FDA and USDA regulations.

– Center for Food Safety, 2015

 

 

Factory Farmed Cows Eating Medicated Grain Feed

Source: www.theparliamentmagazine.eu)
Source: www.theparliamentmagazine.eu)

 

 

Mad Cow Disease is a man-made plague created by factory farming. In cattle, the Mad Cow incubation period before the animal becomes visibly ill is thought to be about five years. In humans, it can be latent for a decade or longer before manifesting as vCJD. (Center for Food Safety, 4/25/2012).
It’s now illegal to feed beef-based products to cows. However – the beef industry is still allowed to use a feed called “chicken litter” consisting of  rendered dead chickens, feathers, chicken manure, and spilled chicken feed … and chicken feed contains cow meat and bone meal. So factory farmed cows are still eating parts of other sick cows – and Mad Cow Disease is still around.
Loophole number two: Cattle byproducts are also allowed in the feed of pigs, chickens, and turkeys.   And, under current laws, the byproducts of those pigs, chickens, and turkeys are allowed in the feed of cattle. (Mercola, 2015)

 

 

On left: A brain infected with vCDJ, riddled with holes due to tissue destruction.

On right: Normal brain tissue at a lower magnification.

(Source: http://trynerdy.com/?p=936)
(Source: http://trynerdy.com/?p=936)
The symptoms of vCJD (staggering, memory loss, impaired vision, and dementia) are quite similar to the symptoms of Alzheimer’s – and there’s no known cure.

 

 

 

 

TDP-43 AND OTHER NEURODEGERATIVE DISEASES

TDP-43 can also lead to other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s or Lou Gehrig’s (ALS) instead of to Alzheimer’s. The particular disease which develops may depend on which area of the brain the proteins attack. (ALZFORUM, 2014)

“Pathological TDP-43 appears to follow a set route through the nervous system, and what that route is depends on the disease at hand. Two new papers in Acta Neuropathologica add TDP-43 itineraries for Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration [FTLD] to a previously published staging scheme for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

“While the starting points and paths taken differ, the disease-specific routes suggest that TDP-43 travels from neuron to neuron along axonal highways… The TDP-43 stages fit with the ongoing theme in neurodegeneration research that these diseases are progressive not only over time, but also in space, as pathological proteins spread throughout the nervous system…

“Overall… the FTLD pathology progressed from the front of the brain to the back. This contrasted with the ALS staging system, which began in the motor cortex at the brain’s apex and moved downward and forward from there.”

– ALZFORUM, 2013

 

 

(Source: imstartx.com)
(Source: imstartx.com)

 

 

 

 

 

GRASS FED VS FACTORY FARMED MEAT

If meat is part of your diet, it’s wise – for many reasons – to eat pasture raised, grass-fed animals when you can.

 

(Source: www.cfandhealthy.com_
(Source: www.cfandhealthy.com)

 

 

It’s good for the animals too. Wouldn’t you prefer walking around outside in the fresh air, feeling healthy, with the sun warming your back, eating food you can easily digest instead of being constrained inside in artificial light and filthy conditions, eating food and chemicals that makes you sick?
(Source: naturalpasturesbeef.ca)
(Source: naturalpasturesbeef.ca)

 

 

Almost all meat served in restaurants in the US is grown on factory farms.
From –
(Source: diet.gtatoplay.com)to –

(Source: www.dailymail.co.uk)

to –

spicy-thighs-cooked-2

 

 

This is what Functional Medical doc Frank Lipman has to say about eating grass-fed vs CAFO-raised cows:

To save money, factory-farmed cows are fed corn (which is cheap and often genetically modified) instead of the grasses they’re meant to graze on. Corn makes the cows sick, so they’re given antibiotics. These meds also fatten the cows – so the system “works” from a business perspective. If you eat factory-farmed meat, you’re ingesting sick animals, plus loads of antibiotics. Buy only grass-fed meat, and whenever possible, get it at a local farmers’ market from small farms.

– Lipman & Claro, 2014

 

(Source: www.eathealthybeef.org)
(Source: www.eathealthybeef.org)

 

 

“Dairy products aside, when past and present meat consumption are factored in, there is three times the risk of developing Alzheimer’s in meat eaters as opposed to vegetarians.”

– Broxmeyer, 2005

 

 

(Source: www.jvs.org.uk)
(Source: www.jvs.org.uk)

 

 

For more information on Alzheimer’s, see Alzheimer’s, Gut Bacteria & Music.
For more information on glyphosate and genetically engineered foods, see Moms to EPA: Recall Monsanto’s Roundup.

 

 

REFERENCES

ALZFORUM. (11/23/2013). The Four Stages of TDP-43 Proteinopathy. See: http://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/four-stages-tdp-43-proteinopathy

ALZFORUM. (1/24/2014). TDP-43 Routes Mapped in Alzheimer’s, Frontotemporal Dementia. See: http://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/tdp-43-routes-mapped-alzheimers-frontotemporal-dementia

Anastasijevic, D. (2014). Why Some With Alzheimer’s Die Without Cognitive Impairment, While Others Do? Mayo Clinic. See: http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/why-do-some-people-with-alzheimers-disease-die-without-cognitive-impairment-while-others-do-223585/

Broxmeyer, L. (2005). Thinking the unthinkable: Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Mad Cow disease: the age-related reemergence of virulent, foodborne, bovine tuberculosis or losing your mind for the sake of a shake or burger. Medical Hypotheses, 64:4,699-705. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15694685

Center For Food Safety. (4/25/2012). Press Release: California Cows Unhappy About Mad Cow Disease. See: http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/press-releases/706/california-cows-unhappy-about-mad-cow-disease#

Center for Food Safety. (2015). About Mad Cow Disease. See: http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/issues/1040/mad-cow-disease/about-mad-cow-disease

Hardin, J.R. (11/30/2014). Alzheimer’s, Gut Bacteria and Music. See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/11/30/alzheimers-gut-bacteria-music/

Hardin, J.R. (5/30/2014). Moms to EPA: Recall Monsanto’s Roundup. See http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/05/30/moms-epa-recall-monsantos-roundup/

Lipman, F. & Claro, D. (2014). The New Health Rules: Simple Changes to Achieve Whole-Body Wellness.

Mayo Clinic. (2014). TDP-43 and Alzheimer’s. Video. See: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/06/04/alzheimers-disease-cafos.aspx

Mercola, R. (2015). Might Alzheimer’s Disease Be “Foodborne”? See: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/06/04/alzheimers-disease-cafos.aspx?e_cid=20150604Z1_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20150604Z1&et_cid=DM78202&et_rid=979877762

Nichols, H. (2014). What are the top 10 leading causes of death in the US? Medical News Today.  See: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282929.php
Walker, L.C. & Jucker, M. (2015).  Prionlike Disease Processes May Underlie Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s: A chain reaction of toxic proteins may help explain major neurodegenerative diseases—and could suggest new treatment options. Scientific American, 24:1. See preview at: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/prionlike-disease-processes-may-underlie-alzheimer-s-and-parkinson-s/

© Copyright 2015 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

How Sugar Affects Your Health – 146 Ways

 

 

(Source: glutenfabulous.org)
(Source: glutenfabulous.org)

 

This list of 146 way sugar affects our health – all detrimental – was compiled by Nancy Appleton, PhD from medical journals and other scientific publications. Dr Appleton is a clinical nutritionist and researcher. She is the author of several books, including Lick The Sugar Habit, Stopping Inflammation: Relieving the Cause of Degenerative Diseases, and Suicide by Sugar: A Startling Look at Our #1 National Addiction. Her website is www.nancyappleton.com

 

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.

2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.

3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.

4. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.

5. Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).

6. Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity and function you loose.

7. Sugar reduces high density lipoproteins.

8. Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.

9 Sugar leads to cancer of the ovaries.

10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.

11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.

12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.

13. Sugar can weaken eyesight.

14. Sugar raises the level of a neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.

15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.

16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.

17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.

18. Sugar malabsorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.

19. Sugar can cause premature aging.

20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.

21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.

22. Sugar contributes to obesity

23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

25. Sugar can cause arthritis.

26. Sugar can cause asthma.

27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).

28. Sugar can cause gallstones.

29. Sugar can cause heart disease.

30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.

31. Sugar can cause multiple sclerosis.

32. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.

33. Sugar can cause varicose veins.

34. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.

35. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.

36. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.

37. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.

38. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.

39. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E (alpha-Tocopherol in the blood.

40. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.

41. Sugar can increase cholesterol.

42. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.

43. Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.

44. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs)(Sugar bound non-enzymatically to protein)

45. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.

46. Sugar causes food allergies.

47. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.

48. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.

49. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.

50. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.

51. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA

52. Sugar can change the structure of protein.

53. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.

54. Sugar can cause cataracts.

55. Sugar can cause emphysema.

56. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.

57. Sugar can promote an elevation of low density lipoproteins (LDL).

58. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.

59. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.

60. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson’s disease.

61. Sugar can cause a permanent altering the way the proteins act in the body.

62. Sugar can increase the size of the liver by making the liver cells divide.

63. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.

64. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.

65. Sugar can damage the pancreas.

66. Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.

67. Sugar is enemy #1 of the bowel movement.

68. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).

69. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.

70. Sugar can make the tendons more brittle.

71. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.

72. Sugar plays a role in pancreatic cancer in women.

73. Sugar can adversely affect school children’s grades and cause learning disorders..

74. Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha, and theta brain waves.

75. Sugar can cause depression.

76. Sugar increases the risk of gastric cancer.

77. Sugar and cause dyspepsia (indigestion).

78. Sugar can increase your risk of getting gout.

79. Sugar can increase the levels of glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test over the ingestion of complex carbohydrates.

80. Sugar can increase the insulin responses in humans consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.

81 High refined sugar diet reduces learning capacity.

82. Sugar can cause less effective functioning of two blood proteins, albumin, and lipoproteins, which may reduce the body’s ability to handle fat and cholesterol.

83. Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.

84. Sugar can cause platelet adhesiveness.

85. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance; some hormones become underactive and others become overactive.

86. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.

87. Sugar can lead to the hypothalamus to become highly sensitive to a large variety of stimuli.

88. Sugar can lead to dizziness.

89. Diets high in sugar can cause free radicals and oxidative stress.

90. High sucrose diets of subjects with peripheral vascular disease significantly increases platelet adhesion.

91. High sugar diet can lead to biliary tract cancer.

92. Sugar feeds cancer.

93. High sugar consumption of pregnant adolescents is associated with a twofold increased risk for delivering a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant.

94. High sugar consumption can lead to substantial decrease in gestation duration among adolescents.

95. Sugar slows food’s travel time through the gastrointestinal tract.

96. Sugar increases the concentration of bile acids in stools and bacterial enzymes in the colon. This can modify bile to produce cancer-causing compounds and colon cancer.

97. Sugar increases estradiol (the most potent form of naturally occurring estrogen) in men.

98. Sugar combines and destroys phosphatase, an enzyme, which makes the process of digestion more difficult.

99. Sugar can be a risk factor of gallbladder cancer.

100. Sugar is an addictive substance.

101. Sugar can be intoxicating, similar to alcohol.

102. Sugar can exacerbate PMS.

103. Sugar given to premature babies can affect the amount of carbon dioxide they produce.

104. Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.

105. The body changes sugar into 2 to 5 times more fat in the bloodstream than it does starch.

106. The rapid absorption of sugar promotes excessive food intake in obese subjects.

107. Sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

108. Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.

109. Sugar can slow down the ability of the adrenal glands to function.

110. Sugar has the potential of inducing abnormal metabolic processes in a normal healthy individual and to promote chronic degenerative diseases.

111.. IVs (intravenous feedings) of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.

112. High sucrose intake could be an important risk factor in lung cancer.

113. Sugar increases the risk of polio.

114. High sugar intake can cause epileptic seizures.

115. Sugar causes high blood pressure in obese people.

116. In Intensive Care Units, limiting sugar saves lives.

117. Sugar may induce cell death.

118. Sugar can increase the amount of food that you eat.

119. In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44% drop in antisocial behavior.

120. Sugar can lead to prostate cancer.

121. Sugar dehydrates newborns.

122. Sugar increases the estradiol in young men.

123. Sugar can cause low birth weight babies.

124. Greater consumption of refined sugar is associated with a worse outcome of schizophrenia

125. Sugar can raise homocysteine levels in the blood stream.

126. Sweet food items increase the risk of breast cancer.

127. Sugar is a risk factor in cancer of the small intestine.

128. Sugar may cause laryngeal cancer.

129. Sugar induces salt and water retention.

130. Sugar may contribute to mild memory loss.

131. As sugar increases in the diet of 10 years olds, there is a linear decrease in the intake of many essential nutrients.

132. Sugar can increase the total amount of food consumed.

133. Exposing a newborn to sugar results in a heightened preference for sucrose relative to water at 6 months and 2 years of age.

134. Sugar causes constipation.

135. Sugar causes varicose veins.

136. Sugar can cause brain decay in prediabetic and diabetic women.

137. Sugar can increase the risk of stomach cancer.

138. Sugar can cause metabolic syndrome.

139. Sugar ingestion by pregnant women increases neural tube defects in embryos.

140. Sugar can be a factor in asthma.

141. The higher the sugar consumption the more chances of getting irritable bowel syndrome.

142. Sugar could affect central reward systems.

143. Sugar can cause cancer of the rectum.

144. Sugar can cause endometrial cancer.

145. Sugar can cause renal (kidney) cell carcinoma.

146. Sugar can cause liver tumors.

 

 

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Many thanks to Dr Beth Forgosh, of Discover Chiropractic of Soho, for bringing Dr Appleton’s list to my attention.

 

 

Note added to this post on 12/29/2014:

 

fruit-vs-dessert

 

Suzette Lawrence, MSN, commented that Dr Appleton’s list, above, describes the effects of REFINED sugars:

“This is not the case for natural fruits sugars that are attached to the fiber in the fruit, known as levulose … if absorbed it occurs low in the intestines and is converted to glycogen in the liver and stored there as an emergency energy source.  I agree that the SAD (Standard American Diet) beginning in infancy sets the stage for every disease, and some new ones. Think, GMO beet sugar … ”

From a 2014 article by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America entitled Natural vs. refined sugars – What’s the difference?:

Sugar, in all forms, is a simple carbohydrate that the body converts into glucose and uses for energy. But the effect on the body and your overall health depends on the type of sugar you’re eating, either natural or refined.

We wanted to explore the difference between these sugar types as a follow-up to our post about whether sugar drives the growth of cancer, which has received several comments. We again turned to Julie Baker, Clinical Oncology Dietitian at our hospital outside Atlanta, for her expertise on the issue.

Understanding sugars

Natural sugars are found in fruit as fructose and in dairy products, such as milk and cheese, as lactose. Foods with natural sugar have an important role in the diet of cancer patients and anyone trying to prevent cancer because they provide essential nutrients that keep the body healthy and help prevent disease.

Refined sugar comes from sugar cane or sugar beets, which are processed to extract the sugar. It is typically found as sucrose, which is the combination of glucose and fructose. We use white and brown sugars to sweeten cakes and cookies, coffee, cereal and even fruit. Food manufacturers add chemically produced sugar, typically high-fructose corn syrup, to foods and beverages, including crackers, flavored yogurt, tomato sauce and salad dressing. Low-fat foods are the worst offenders, as manufacturers use sugar to add flavor.

Most of the processed foods we eat add calories and sugar with little nutritional value. In contrast, fruit and unsweetened milk have vitamins and minerals. Milk also has protein and fruit has fiber, both of which keep you feeling full longer.

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67. Ibid.
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78. Ibid, 44
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143. De Stefani E, Mendilaharsu M, & Deneo-Pellegrini H. Sucrose as a Risk Factor for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum: a Case-control Study in Uruguay. International Journal of Cancer. 1998 Jan 5;75(1):40-4.
144. Levi F, Franceschi S, Negri E, & La Vecchia C. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer. Cancer. 1993 Jun 1;71(11):3575-3581.
145. Mellemgaard A. et al. Dietary Risk Factors for Renal Cell Carcinoma in Denmark. European Journal of Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82.
146. Rogers AE, Nields HM, & Newberne PM. Nutritional and Dietary Influences on Liver Tumorigenesis in Mice and Rats. Arch Toxicol Suppl. 1987;10:231-43. Review.

 

 

© Copyright 2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Alzheimer’s, Gut Bacteria and Music

LAST UPDATED 7/18/2018.

 

 

(Source: www.sciencedaily.com)
(Source: www.sciencedaily.com)

 

 

Alzheimer’s is a form of dementia that gradually worsens over time, affecting memory, thinking and behavior – eventually becoming severe enough to interfere with all aspects of daily life. Alzheimer’s involves the progressive loss of brain function, is the most common cause of dementia and the 6th leading cause of death in the US.
In 2013 over 5 million American had the disease. The rates rise yearly and are expected to reach 16 million by 2050.

Continue reading Alzheimer’s, Gut Bacteria and Music

Omega-3 versus Omega-6 Fatty Acids

 

 

omega3-vs-omega6

 

 

The story of Omega-3 versus Omega-6 fatty acids for our health stated in its simplest form (Gunnars, 2014):

  • A diet low in Omega-3s but high in Omega-6 but low in Omega-3 produces excessive inflammation.
  • A diet that includes a balanced amount of each reduces inflammation.
  • People eating the Standard American Diet (SAD) are consuming a much higher level of Omega-6s relative to Omega-3s and the excessive inflammation resulting from this imbalance causes a whole range of serious health problems – including heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, arthritis, Alzheimers, many types of cancers, and others.
  • Metabolic Syndrome: Conditions occurring together (high blood pressure, high blood sugar level, excess fat around the waist, abnormal cholesterol levels) that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

 


Both Omega-6 and Omega-3 essential fatty acids are poly-unsaturated types of oils the human body doesn’t have the enzymes to produce for itself so we must get them from our diets or supplements.
These types of fatty acids differ from most other fats in that they are not simply used for energy. They are biologically active, playing essential roles in processes such as blood clotting and inflammation.
Without both Omega-3s and Omega-6s in proper ratio, we are highly likely to become sick.

 

 

 

(Source:  cornerstonewellnessmd.com)
EFFECTS OF OMEGA-3 DEFICIENCY  (Source: cornerstonewellnessmd.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

BENEFITS OF OMEGA-3 ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS (Watson, 2014)

 

Omega-3 essential fatty acids support heart, brain and mental health; reduce cancer risk and help cancer patients recover; help prevent and ease arthritis; reduce the risk of eye problems; and keep the skin and scalp healthy.

 

 

(Source:  www.drsinatra.com)
Omega-3s and Heart Health. (Source: www.drsinatra.com)
OMEGA-3s FOR HEART HEALTH
  1. Help lower cholesterol levels
  2. Reduce triglycerides (unhealthy fats in the blood) by as much as 30%. High triglyceride levels are linked to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.
  3. Decrease the risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats) which can lead to sudden death
  4. Can help prevent blood clots from forming, breaking off and blocking an artery to the heart (causing a heart attack) or an artery to the brain (causing a stroke
  5. Can slightly lower blood pressure – high blood pressure is another risk factor for heart disease.
  6. Reduce inflammation all over the body, helping prevent blocked arteries.
  7. Prevent the re-narrowing (re-stenosis) of coronary arteries after angioplasty surgery.

 

 

 

 

(Source:  omega3foods.arccfn.org.au)
(Source: omega3foods.arccfn.org.au)

 

 

OMEGA-3 AND CANCER
  1. Fish oils, high in Omega-3 fatty acids, have been found to suppress the grown of certain types of cancers in animals.
  2. May reduce the risk of hormone-fueled cancers such as breast cancer
  3. May inhibit the growth of lung, prostate and colorectal cancers.
  4. May help cancer patients survive their disease
  5. Since there is a known link between excessive inflammation in the body and the development of certain cancers, Omega-3s likely reduce the risk of developing all cancers.

 

 

 

 

 

Omega-3 is a crucial nutrient for the brain and for good mental health. Countries where people eat more fish have fewer cases of depression. (Source:  www.wileysfinest.com)
Omega-3 fatty acid is a crucial nutrient for the brain and for good mental health. Countries where people eat more fish report fewer cases of depression. (Source: www.wileysfinest.com)

 

 

OMEGA-3 AND MENTAL HEALTH
  1. Omega-3 fatty acids promote blood flow in the brain and are essential for brain health.
  2. People getting insufficient Omega-3s in their diet are at increased risk of developing dementia, depression, ADD, dyslexia and schizophrenia.
  3. Omega-3s keep the synapses (tiny gaps across which nerve impulses must pass) in the brain working properly. Nerve impulses need to get through the membrane surrounding the neurons in the brain – and the cell membranes are made mostly of fats, including Omega-3s.
  4. Omega-3 fatty acids improve learning and memory.
  5. They improve mood in people who are depressed.
  6. They fight age-related cognitive decline due to dementia.
  7. Infants require DHA so their brains develop properly, especially during the first two years of life.
  8. A study found that babies born to mother with higher DHA blood levels scored higher on tests of attention and learning than those whose mothers had lower DHA levels.
  9. Another study found that children of mothers who had taken fish oil supplements during pregnancy had higher IQs than the children of mothers who took a placebo.

 

 

 

 

Cauliflower for Arthritis: A cup of cauliflower contains 0.2 grams of Omega-3s - 8% of the recommended daily value.  (Source: www.arthritis-health.com)
Roasted Cauliflower for Arthritis: A cup of cauliflower contains 0.2 grams of Omega-3s – 8% of the recommended daily value. (Source:  www.arthritis-health.com)

 

OMEGA-3 AND ARTHRITIS
  1. Arthritis is the result of the immune system’s autoimmune (abnormal) response to the body’s own joints – as if they were infectious agents, foreign invaders needing to be destroyed. The resulting inflammation produces swollen, stiff, painful joints.
  2. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation throughout the body.
  3. The body also converts Omega-3s to even more potent anti-inflammatory compounds such as resolvins (a family of bioactive products).
  4. Arthritic patients taking Omega-3s have been able to reduce – or even stop – using corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

 

 

 

Foods containing Omega-3 fatty acids (including salmon, flax seeds, and walnuts)  have been known to give skin an almost instant glow.
Foods containing Omega-3 fatty acids (including salmon, flax seeds, and walnuts) have been known to give skin an almost instant glow.
OMEGA-3 AND THE SKIN
  1. Omega-3 fatty acids, especially eisosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are essential for healthy skin and hair. EPA helps regulate oil production, keeping the skin hydrated.
  2. Omega-3s protect the skin from damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation  from the sun. UV exposure produces harmful substances called free radicals, which damage cells and can lead to premature aging and cancer. Omega-3s act as an antioxidant protecting the body from these free radicals.
  3. Omega-3s also help repair skin damage by preventing the release of enzymes that destroy collagen.
  4. Research suggests that Omega-3’s help prevent certain types of skin cancer.
  5. The anti-inflammatory properties of Omega-3s help relieve  autoimmune responses expressed through the skin – such as rosacea, psoriasis and eczema.
  6. Insufficient Omega-3 levels can cause the scalp to get dry and flaky (dandruff) and the hair to lose its luster.
  7. Omega-3s can also be given to pets to improve their skin and coat health.

 

 

 

“Omega-3 fatty acids are most important, as they bring balance to our hormones, reduce inflammation, regulate our blood sugar, prevent blood clotting, keep our cholesterol and triglycerides in balance, relax our blood vessels, and and make our cells healthy and resilient.”
– The Natural Hormone Makeover by Phuli Cohan

 

 

(Source: www.allaboutvision.com)
(Source: www.allaboutvision.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 TYPES OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS FOUND IN NATURE
The principal Omega-3 essential fatty acids (EFA’s) are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid ( DHA), primarily found in certain fish. α-Linolenic acid (ALA), another Omega-3 fatty acid, is found in plants such as nuts and seeds.
Wikipedia’s entry for Omega-3 fatty acid lists these as the most common Omega-3 fatty acids found in nature (Wikipedia, 8/28/2014):

Hexadecatrienoic acid (HTA)
α-Linolenic acid (ALA)
Stearidonic acid (SDA)
Eicosatrienoic acid (ETE)
Eicosatetraenoic acid (ETA)
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)
Heneicosapentaenoic acid (HPA)
Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), Clupanodonic acid
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)
Tetracosapentaenoic acid
Tetracosahexaenoic acid (Nisinic acid)

 

 

images

 

 

 

FOODS NATURALLY HIGH IN OMEGA-3 ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS

 

 

Food Sources of Omega-3's
Food Sources of Omega-3’s

 

 

Foods high in Omega-3s are naturally delicious to the palate.
Foods Rich in Omega-3s:
SEAFOOD:
  • Halibut
  • Herring
  • Mackerel
  • Oysters
  • Salmon
  • Sardines
  • Trout
  • Tuna(fresh)

 

FRESH PRODUCE CONTAINING ALA OMEGA-3s:

Vegetables, especially green leafy ones, are rich in ALA, a form of Omega-3 fatty acids. Although ALA isn’t as powerful as the other Omega-3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA, these vegetables also have fiber and other nutrients, as well as Omega-3s.

  • Brussels sprouts
  • Kale
  • Mint
  • Parsley
  • Spinach
  • Watercress

 

OILS CONTAINING ALA OMEGA-3s:
  • Canola oil
  • Cod liver oil
  • Flaxseed oil
  • Mustard oil
  • Soybean oil
  • Walnut oil
Here are some charts to help you make good choices.

 

(Source: www.cancercoachchris.com)
(Source: www.cancercoachchris.com)

 

 ***********

 

SOURCES OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS:  ALA , EPA and DHA are most common Omega-3 fatty acids, generally found in sea food.   (Source:  chemistry.tutorvista.com)
SOURCES OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS:
ALA , EPA and DHA are most common Omega-3 fatty acids, generally found in sea food. (Source: chemistry.tutorvista.com)

 

 ***********

 

9 FOODS RICH IN OMEGA-3s  Foods that are rich in Omega-3 fats, fiber and antioxidants top the list of foods to include in your diet.  (Source:  mollymorgan-nutritionexpert.blogspot)
9 FOODS RICH IN OMEGA-3s
Foods that are rich in Omega-3 fats, fiber and antioxidants top the list of foods to include in your diet. (Source: mollymorgan-nutritionexpert.blogspot)

 

***********

 

A list of seafood containing Omega-3's: Seafood sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. (Source:  www.1vigor.com)
Seafood sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. (Source: www.1vigor.com)

 

 

You can check out the Omega-3 foods you commonly eat on SELFNutritionData’s comprehensive list of the FOODS HIGHEST IN TOTAL OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS.  (Millen, 2014-a)

 

 

SOURCES OF OMEGA-3s FOR VEGETARIANS AND VEGANS
Vegetarians and vegans can obtain adequate levels of Omega-3s without eating fish or fish oil-based supplements.
The table below summarizes some of the basic relationships between Omega-3s and types of diet:
Diet Type ALA Food Sources EPA and DHA Food Sources
Vegan many plants sea plants; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Generally vegetarian but including fish many plants and most fish eggs, cheese, milk, and yogurt, especially when obtained from grass-fed animals but in varying amounts depending on additional factors; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Generally vegetarian but including eggs, cheese, milk and yogurt (without fish, sea plants, or meat) many plants; eggs, cheese, milk, and yogurt most fish; sea plants; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Plant-eating and meat-eating (but without fish or sea plants) many plants; many meats many meats, especially when obtained from grass-fed animals, but in varying amounts, depending on additional factors; possibly land plant foods when fermented with the help of certain fungi
Source:  The George Mateljan Foundation

 

 

 

Vegetarian-Sources-of-Omega-3s

 

 

 

 

The evening primrose flower (O. biennis) produces an oil containing a high content of γ-linolenic acid, a type of Omega−6 fatty acid.
The evening primrose flower (O. biennis) produces an oil containing a high content of γ-linolenic acid, a type of Omega−6 fatty acid.

 

 

OMEGA-6 FATTY ACIDS

 

Elevated Omega-6 intakes are associated with an increase in ALL inflammatory diseases – which is to say virtually all diseases. The list includes – but isn’t limited to (Kresser, 2014?):

 

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Allergies
  • Cancer
  • Psychiatric Disorders
  • All Autoimmune Diseases
For more information on the role of inflammation in the development of disease, see INFLAMMATION.  For a list of  80 autoimmune and autoimmune related diseases, see AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS.

 

Four major food oils (palm, soybean, rapeseed and sunflower) provide more than 100 million metric tons annually, yielding over 32 million metric tons of Omega-6 linoleic acid (LA) and 4 million metric tons of Omega-3 alpha-linoleic acid (ALA).
Dietary sources of Omega-6 fatty acids include:
 (Wikipedia, 7/19/2014)

 

 

 

 

33 66

 

OMEGA-6 TO OMEGA-3 RATIO

A distorted ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is a hallmark of the Western diet – and one of its most damaging characteristics.  The Standard American Diet (bearing the apt acronym ‘SAD’) has us consuming huge amounts of Omega-6s and way too few Omega-3s.

 

 

Americans eat too little Omega 3 and way too much Omega 6 (Source: www.meandmydiabetes.com)

The Standard American Diet (SAD)  –  too little Omega-3 and way too much Omega-6
(Source: www.meandmydiabetes.com)

 

 

Our Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio tends to be 25 times higher than it should be. Small wonder we are ill with ailments from allergies to heart disease to cancers. (Kresser, 2014?)
Omega-6 is pro-inflammatory. Omega-3s are neutral. Diets containing a lot of Omega-6 and little Omega-3 increase inflammation. Diets containing a lot of Omega-3 and little Omega-6 reduce inflammation.
The human body requires both Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids to perform many essential functions.
Omega-6 is found mostly in plant oils such as corn, soybean, and sunflower oils as well as in nuts and seeds. The American Heart Association recommends we consume about 5-10% of our food calories from Omega-6 fatty acids.
Omega-3s come primarily from fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel as well as from walnuts and flax seeds. The American Heart Association recommends that people without coronary heart disease have at least two servings of fatty fish per week. They recommend that people with known coronary heart disease eat more, about 1 gram of EPA and DHA daily, preferably from fatty fish. (Jaret, 2014)

 

This chart shows how Omega-6 fatty acids promote inflammation in the body and how Omega-3s are anti-inflammatory. Omega-6 contains linoleic acid (LA) while Omega-3s contain alpha-linoleic acid (ALA) yielding EPA and DHA.
HOW OMEGA-3 BECOMES ANTI-INFLAMMATORY IN THE BODY & OMEGA-6 BECOMES INFLAMMATORY (Source: www.psycheducation.org)
FATTY ACID PATHWAYS IN THE BODY: How OMEGA-6 fatty acids become inflammatory in the body & OMEGA-3s become anti-inflammatory
(Source: www.psycheducation.org)
Linoleic acid (LA), the shortest-chained Omega-6, is an essential fatty acid. Arachidonic acid is a physiologically significant Omega 6, the precursor for prostaglandins (mediator cells with a variety of regulatory functions in the body), endocannabinoids (a group of neuro-modulatory lipids),
and other  physiologically active molecules.
Excess Omega-6 fatty acids from vegetable oils interfere with the health benefits of Omega-3 fats, in part because they compete for the same rate-limiting enzymes. A high proportion of Omega-6 to Omega-3 shifts the physiological state in the tissues to become pro-thrombotic,  pro-inflammatory and pro-constrictive – and hence push bodily tissues toward the development of many diseases. (Wikipedia, 7/19/14)
A chart showing the Omega-6 versus Omega-3 contents of various food oils – you can see that fish oils are the healthiest (anti-inflammatory) for us while safflower and sunflower oils are the unhealthiest (inflammatory):
To correct this ratio you can supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids or eat lots wild fish, while avoiding the polyunsaturated fatty acids that have high levels of Omega-6s. (Source: anabolicmen.com)
To correct a poor intake ratio, you can supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids or eat lots wild fish, while avoiding the polyunsaturated fatty acids that have high levels of Omega-6s.
(Source: anabolicmen.com)

 

 

The graphic below provides an inkling of how our diet is making us sick: Industrially produced eggs deliver 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3 while the ratio for range-fed eggs is much more balanced. Industrially produced beef delivers 21 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3 while the ratio for grass-fed beef is considerably better.

 

 

omega63ratios

 

Add to that the vast amounts of potato chips, French fries, micro-wave popcorn, margarine, most salad dressings, frying oils, and processed foods we consume and it’s not at all surprising that chronic, degenerative diseases pervade our culture.
You can check out the Omega-6 foods you commonly eat on SELFNutritionData’s comprehensive list of the FOODS HIGHEST IN TOTAL OMEGA-6 FATTY ACIDS.  (Millen, 2014-b)

 

 

 

(Source: www.juvenon.com)
(Source: www.juvenon.com)

 

 

 

Joseph Hibbeln, MD, a researcher studying Omega-3 and Omega-6 intake at the National Institute of Health (NIH) observed about the rising intake of Omega-6:

The increases in world linolaic acid (LA) consumption over the past century may be considered a very large uncontrolled experiment that may have contributed to increased societal burdens of aggression, depression and cardiovascular mortality.

(Kresser, 2014?)

 

 

 

 

OMEGA-3 SUPPLEMENTS

 

 

images-3

 

Omega-3 supplements must be taken in a form that delivers the fatty acids in a bio-available form or your body won’t be able to get the benefits.
These are some high quality Omega-3 supplements recommended by my health care providers to augment my Omega-3 intake from foods:

 

  • Carlson’s Super Omega-3 Fish Oil Concentrate 1,000mg soft gels
            The dose for me is 1 soft gel 2x/day.

 

CSN147_Xl_1

 

  • NutraSea 2X Concentrated 1250 mg EPA + DHA
           The dose for me is 1 soft gel 3x/day.

 

ASC-00548-1

 

            This company also makes a vegan version. It’s a liquid, not a soft gel.  I don’t know the dosage.

 

 

$T2eC16FHJG!FFm3f6!SiBR,8gd)8R!~~_32-260x260-0-0

 

 

  • Integrative Therapeutics’  Eskimo-3 Fish Oil gel caps
The dose for me is 2 gel caps 2x/day.

integrative-therapeutics-tyler-eskimo-3-105-softgels

 

 

 ********************

In addition to omega-6 fatty acids, most polyunsaturated oils are highly prone to oxidation and rancidity, which turns these so-called ‘heart healthy’ oils to toxic liquids. (Source: eatdrinkpaleo.com.au)
In addition to Omega-6 fatty acids, most polyunsaturated oils are highly prone to oxidation and rancidity, which turns these so-called ‘heart healthy’ oils to toxic liquids. (Source: eatdrinkpaleo.com.au)

 

********************

 

REFERENCES

Cohan, P.  (2008). The Natural hormone Makeover: 10 Steps to Rejuvenate Your Health and Rediscover Your Inner Glow.  See: http://www.amazon.com/The-Natural-Hormone-Makeover-Rejuvenate/dp/0471744840

Gunnars, K. (2014). How to Optimize Your Omega-6 to Omega-3 Ratio. Authority Nutrition: An Evidence-Based Approach. See:  http://authoritynutrition.com/optimize-omega-6-omega-3-ratio/

Jaret, P. (2014). Understanding the Omega Fatty Acids. WebMD.  See: http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthy-kitchen-11/omega-fatty-acids

Kresser, C. (2014?). How too much omega-6 and not enough omega-3 is making us sick. See:  http://chriskresser.com/how-too-much-omega-6-and-not-enough-omega-3-is-making-us-sick

Millen, K. (2014-a). Foods Highest in Total Omega-6 Fatty Acids. SELFNutritionData.  See:  http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000140000000000000000.html

Millen, K. (2014-b). Foods Highest in Total Omega-6 Fatty Acids. SELFNutritionData. See:  http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000141000000000000000-1w.html

Watson, S. (2014). Benefits of Omega-3. How Stuff Works. See: http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/food-nutrition/facts/benefits-of-omega-31.htm

Wikipedia. (8/28/2014). Omega-3 fatty acid. See:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid#List_of_omega-3_fatty_acids

Wikipedia. (7/19/2014). Omega-6 fatty acid. See:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-6_fatty_acid

 

 

© Copyright 2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 

Moms to EPA: Recall Monsanto’s Roundup

An article called MOMS TO EPA: RECALL MONSANTO’S ROUNDUP arrived in my inbox this morning, the day after I’d posted Genetically Modified Organisms – Our Food.
It tells the  stories of  how two groups of mothers, Moms Across America and Thinking Moms Revolution, discovered that the serious health problems their children suffered from were linked to exposure to the chemical glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup.
When these moms had their sick children and the rest of their families’ glyphosate levels checked, the tests revealed high, unsafe levels in their children’s urine, in the families’ drinking water, and in the mothers’ breast milk.
This turned them into activists who are now taking action to get the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to recall Monsanto’s Roundup, the most widely used herbicide in the world.
The stories of their children’s suffering from entirely preventable illnesses are heart breaking – their stories of how they brought their children back to health by removing all GMOs from their diets are inspiring.
I’m also reprinting the article here because it contains links to the plentiful scientific research findings that demonstrate the serious harm being done to humans, animals and the environment by glyphosate. I’ve added a Source list after the article.
Glyphosate is the active chemical in Monsanto’s herbicide Roundup, which is sprayed on crops grown from its Roundup Ready seeds. Roundup Ready seeds have been genetically engineered to be resistant to glyphosate – allowing farmers to douse their crops with Roundup herbicide without killing the crops themselves.
Since Monsanto introduced Roundup in 1975, it has become the best-selling herbicide in the world. Its prolific use has led to the emergence of glyphosate-resistant weeds – inducing farmers to spray ever heavier amounts of Roundup on their crops.

Note: I’ve added a list of sources to the bottom of the original article.

 

 

OCAlogo

 

The Organic Consumers Association’s article:

 

Moms to EPA: Recall Monsanto’s Roundup
By Alexis Baden-Mayer
Organic Consumers Association, May 29, 2014

For related articles and information, please visit OCA’s  All About Organics page, our Genetic Engineering page, and our Millions Against Monsanto page.

 

Hell hath no fury . . . like a mother whose child has been sickened by a toxin that’s almost impossible to avoid.

Two activist groups, Moms Across America and Thinking Moms Revolution, want the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to recall Monsanto’s Roundup, the most widely used herbicide/pesticide in the world.

Now is the time to do it, they say, because the EPA is conducting a registration review of glyphosate.

Representatives of the two groups contacted the EPA to request a meeting. When the EPA ignored them, they rallied supporters. In just three days, about 10,000 moms from all over the country rang the phones off the hook at the EPA.

A week later, five Moms Across America leaders were sitting around a boardroom table with nine EPA employees who have the power to recall Roundup. The moms brought lawyers, scientists and advocates from Organic Consumers Association, Natural Resources Defense Council, Consumers Union, Beyond Pesticides and the Truth-In-Labeling Coalition as back-up.

What was supposed to be a one-hour meeting turned into two. The EPA’s Dana Vogel, director of the Health Effects Division in the Office of Pesticide Programs, and other EPA staff stayed glued to their seats as one mother after another shared heart-wrenching stories of parenting children with life-threatening allergies, severe gastrointestinal problems, mysterious autism-spectrum disorders, and major nutritional deficiencies.

The common thread in those stories? Exposure to glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup.

Wrenching tales of preventable illnesses

The activist moms had long suspected pesticides might be behind their children’s health problems. So they had their families tested for glyphosate. The tests showed unsafe levels of glyphosate in their drinking water, in their breast milk and in their children’s urine.

That’s when they resolved to get in front of the EPA. And when they did, they told their stories.

Moms Across America co-founder Zen Honeycutt recounted how when she learned of the link between glyphosate and autism, she had her middle child, who had been exhibiting autism symptoms, tested for glyphosate. His urine had 8.7 parts per billion glyphosate—eight times more than is allowed in drinking water in the E.U. She immediately eliminated all potential sources of glyphosate from his diet. After six weeks, the glyphosate was out of his system. And so were the autism symptoms. He stopped hitting people, and his grades went back up from D’s to A’s.

After a year of eating organic, her eldest son’s walnut allergy went from a 19 to a 0.2. It’s no longer life-threatening.

In fact, all of the mothers’ children suffered from deteriorating conditions until they put them on all-organic diets. When they figured out that going organic was the only thing that helped ease their children’s symptoms, they started investigating the food they had been eating for possible causes of their children’s poor health.

Each mother began to suspect glyphosate.

Zoe Swartz, leader of East Coast Moms Across America and founder of GMO Free Lancaster County told the EPA, “I’m really angry that I didn’t know that there was glyphosate in the food I was feeding my daughter.” She described her toddler’s problems with “leaky gut syndrome” which has been linked to glyphosate exposure. After three weeks of an organic diet, the child’s symptoms began to disappear.

Megan Davenhall of Thinking Moms Revolution, mother of an 11-year-old boy with autism, told the EPA, “It’s going to be a long road for us.”

She began her research when her son was diagnosed at age three. As she turned to organic foods, and eliminated chemicals, he started to grow—something he hadn’t done for two and a half years. He weighed only 38 pounds at age six. Now, Davenhall told the EPA, “He’s doing better. He’s not off the spectrum. … It’s a long road for us, because my son was so very damaged. … He was skin and bones and it’s taken us years to recover his gut health.”

“The damage didn’t need to happen to him,” Davenhall said. “And I don’t want to see it happen to one other kid out there, not one. What we feed our kids, what we put into our bodies, is the most important thing. Healthy food should be available for everybody. It needs to happen. It needs to happen today.”

Sarah Cusack of Thriving Family Health talked about her daughter Claire who at 12 months, changed from a happy, easy-going baby to a miserable, constipated baby who was literally starving. She was emaciated. She had a huge bloated belly. At 20 months, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. But the turning point came when she switched to an organic diet. Claire is now a healthy six-year-old. Her mom is a health coach. Cusack says that an all-organic diet is the centerpiece of her practice. She’s seen improvement in clients with myriad health problems, including migraines, eczema, rashes, gastro-intestinal conditions, mood disorders like anxiety and depression, constipation and auto-immune conditions.

Swaying decision-makers with Science

After the testimonials, It was time to hit the EPA with hard science.

Honeycutt delivered a 20-minute presentation on how glyphosate figures as an environmental cause of so many of the diseases impacting our kids today. She left behind a binder, prepared by Moms Across America volunteers, packed with scientific articles supporting her assertions. Zen’s presentation and the materials she presented to the EPA covered the following points.

•    Exposure to glyphosate correlates with chronic illness. Chronically ill people have significantly higher levels of glyphosate in their systems than healthy people.

•    Glyphosate is an endocrine disruptor which is toxic to placental cells. This means it may impact our ability to conceive and carry healthy babies to term. It may also cause breast cancer.

•    Glyphosate destroys the gut bacteria we need for good health. Scientists have observed that in chickens and cattle, glyphosate kills the good gut bacteria while leaving behind bacteria that causes food poisoning. Glyphosate’s negative impact on our microbiome may be the reason for increasing rates of allergies, celiac sprue and gluten intolerance, and colitis and Crohn’s disease.

•    Glyphosate makes vaccines far more toxic than they would otherwise be. When children are overexposed to glyphosate, they are more likely to react badly to vaccination. There’s an intricate connection between the gut and the brain, such that an unhealthy digestive system translates into pathologies in the brain. Aluminum, mercury and glyphosate work synergistically to create severe deficiency in sulfate supplies to the brain. This may be what’s causing the epidemic levels of autism and other diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

•    Glyphosate is a chelator that deprives living things of vital nutrients, vitamins and minerals. This is how glyphosate kills plants. It may also be how it’s killing people. Glyphosate-induced vitamin deficiency may be a factor in the growing cancer rates. Glyphosate has been directly linked to Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. A recent meta-analysis found that exposure to glyphosate doubled the likelihood of contracting B cell lymphoma.

Will the EPA consider this evidence and move to protect our children from glyphosate?

We’re about to find out.

For five years, the EPA has been collecting and analyzing data. This year (2014), the agency will publish a risk assessment and open a 60-day public comment period. Then it will publish a proposed registration and provide another opportunity for public comments.

Finally, the EPA will make a registration decision to either continue business-as-usual, place new restrictions on the use of glyphosate, or to take it off the market.

Moms want it off the market.

Moms Across America and Thinking Moms Revolution are currently working with the EPA to develop protocols for an independent scientific study of glyphosate in breast milk for inclusion in the agency’s review.

These moms won’t stop until Roundup is recalled and they need your help. Please join the Recall Roundup campaign at Moms Across America or Thinking Moms Revolution.

 

Alexis Baden-Mayer is political director of the Organic Consumers Association.For more information on this topic or related issues you can search the thousands of archived articles on the OCA website.Organic Consumers Association · 6771 South Silver Hill Drive, Finland MN 55603 ·
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This is the article as it appears on the Organic Consumers Association site: http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_30153.cfm

 

 

SOURCES CITED IN THE ARTICLE – listed in the order the links appear

All About Organics pageWhy We Should All Eat More Organic Food. Organic Consumers Association. See:  http://organicconsumers.org/organlink.cfm

Genetic Engineering page:  Earth Open Source. GMO Myths and Truths. Organic Consumers Association. See:  http://www.organicconsumers.org/gelink.cfm

Millions Against Monsanto pageMillions Against Monsanto. Organic Consumers Association. See: http://www.organicconsumers.org/monsanto/

Moms Across America:  Moms Across America. See: http://www.organicconsumers.org/monsanto/

Thinking Moms Revolution:  Thinking Moms Revolution. See: https://www.facebook.com/thinkingmomsrevolution

recall Monsanto’s Roundup:  See: https://www.facebook.com/events/897793350237253/

glyphosate:   Mercola, R. (April 15 2014). New Studies Reveal Damaging Effects of Glyphosate. Organic Consumers Association. See: http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_29790.cfm

tested for glyphosate:  Glyphosate Testing Kit for Urine and Water. See: http://www.microbeinotech.com/Default.aspx?tabid=57

unsafe levels of glyphosate:  Glyphosate Testing Full Report: Findings in American Mothers’ Breast Milk, Urine and Water. See: http://www.momsacrossamerica.com/glyphosate_testing_results

Zen HoneycuttCA State Grange Rally for GE Labeling Jan 6th CA Capitol Steps- Zen Honeycutt’s Speech. Moms Across America. See: http://www.momsacrossamerica.com/ca_capitol_steps_speech

glyphosate and autismJeffrey Smith interviews Dr. Stephanie Seneff about Glyphosate. See video:  http://vimeo.com/6591412

GMO Free Lancaster County:  See:  https://www.facebook.com/GMOFREELANCASTERCOUNTYorg

linked to glyphosate exposure:   Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. (2013). Glyphosate’s Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases. Entropy 2013, 15, 1416-1463. See: http://groups.csail.mit.edu/sls/publications/2013/Seneff_Entropy-15-01416.pdf

Thinking Moms Revolution:   Thinking Moms Revolution. See: http://thinkingmomsrevolution.com/

Thriving Family Health:  Sarah Cusack Scholl. See: http://www.thrivingfamilyhealth.com

Exposure to glyphosate:  Kruger, M. et al.(2014). Detection of Glyphosate Residues in Animals and Humans. Journal of Environmental & Analytical Toxicology, 2014, 4:2.
See: http://omicsonline.org/open-access/detection-of-glyphosate-residues-in-animals-and-humans-2161-0525.1000210.pdf

Glyphosate is an endocrine disrupter:   Gastnier, C. et al. (2009). Glyphosate-based herbicides are toxic and endocrine disruptors in human cell lines. Toxicology, 2009, 262:3, 184-91. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539684

toxic to placental cells:  Richard, S. et al. (2005). Differential Effects of Glyphosate and Roundup on Human Placental Cells and Aromatase. Environmental Health Perspectives, 2005; 113:6, 716–720. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1257596/

ability to conceive:   Mercola, R. (April 1 2014). Roundup Toxicity May Impact Male Fertility: Study. See: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/04/01/Roundup-toxicity-male-infertility.aspx

cause breast cancer:   Thongprakaisang S. et al. (2013). Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors. Food & Chemical Toxicology, 2013, 59, 129-36. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23756170

Glyphosate destroys the gut bacteria:  Sustainable Pulse. (Sept 7 2013). New Review Shows Glyphosate Destroys Human Health and Biodiversity. See: http://sustainablepulse.com/2013/09/07/new-review-shows-glyphosate-destroys-human-health-and-biodiversity/#.U4i24ighy-9

chickens:  Shehata. A. A. et al. (2013). The effect of glyphosate on potential pathogens and beneficial members of poultry microbiota in vitro. Current  Microbiology, 2013 66:4, 350-8. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23224412

cattle:  Kruger, M. et al. (2013). Glyphosate suppresses the antagonistic effect of Enterococcus spp. on Clostridium botulinum. Anaerobe, 2013, 20,74-8.  See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23396248

Glyphsate’s negative impact on our microbiome:  Polan, M. (2013). Some of My Best Friends are Germs. New York Times Magazine, May 15 2013. See: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/magazine/say-hello-to-the-100-trillion-bacteria-that-make-up-your-microbiome.html?pagewanted=all

increasing rates of allergies:  Basulto, D. (2014). The secret to treating your allergies may lie in your stomach. WashingtonPost.com, April 17 2014. See: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/innovations/wp/2014/04/17/the-secret-to-treating-your-allergies-may-lie-in-your-stomach/

celiac sprue and gluten intolerance:  Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. (2013). Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance. Interdisciplinary Toxicology, 2013, 6:4, 159–184. See: http://sustainablepulse.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Glyphosate_II_Samsel-Seneff.pdf

Crohn’s disease:  Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. (2013). Glyphosate’s Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases. Entropy, 2013, 15:4), 1416-1463. See: http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/15/4/1416

Glyphosate makes vaccines far more toxic:   Viadro, C. I. (2014). Sulfate, Sleep and Sunlight: The Disruptive and Destructive Effects of Heavy Metals and Glyphosate. Mercola.com. See:  http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/05/08/heavy-metals-glyphosate-health-effects.aspx

epidemic levels of autism and other diseases such as Alzheimer’s:  Seneff, S. (2013). Roundup: The “Nontoxic” Chemical that May Be Destroying our Health. The Weston A. Price Foundation. See:  http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/Roundup-the-nontoxic-chemical-that-may-be-destroying-our-health/

growing cancer rates:  Hardt, R. (2014). Glyphosate it binds minerals and cuts off the production of neurotransmitters and hormones: A visual connection of the routes of diseases and cancer. Academia.edu. See:  http://www.academia.edu/5772865/GLYPHOSATE_IT_BINDS_MINERALS_AND_CUTS_OFF_THE_PRODUCTION_OF_NEUROTRANSMITTERS_AND_HORMONES….A_VISUAL_CONNECTION_OF_THE_ROUTES_OF_DISEASES_AND_CANCER

exposure to glyphosate doubled the likelihood of contracting B cell lymphoma:  Schinasi, L. & Leon, M.E. (2014). Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and occupational exposure to agricultural pesticide chemical groups and active ingredients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2014, 11:4, 4449-527. See:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24762670

Moms Across America:  Moms Across America. See:  https://www.facebook.com/MomsAcrossAmerica

Thinking Moms Revolution:  Thinking Moms Revolution. See:  https://www.facebook.com/thinkingmomsrevolution

Organic Consumers Association:  Organic Consumers Association. See: http://www.organicconsumers.org/

 

 

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