Tag Archives: Damage to Gut Microbiome from Antibiotics

ANTIBIOTICS, THE GUT MICROBIOME & THE REST OF THE BODY

 

(Source: fatburningman.com)

 

Christian John Lillis, of the Peggy Lillis Foundation, sent this text to me yesterday:

At a talk by Bruce Hirsch on FMT and he just said, referring to antibiotics, “What happens in the gut doesn’t stay in the gut.” I thought that was well put.

–   Christian John Lillis on 3/9/2016

Well put indeed! Dr Hirsch succinctly summed up, in one short sentence, antibiotics’ huge, deleterious impact on the probiotic bacteria living in our gut microbes … and from there to the rest of  the body. Wreck your gut microbiome and you’re wrecking your health.

 

Bruce E. Hirsch, MD

Specialist in Infectious Disease & Geriatric Medicine

dr-bruce-e-hirsch-md-11308126

 

If you wish to read more about Dr Hirsch and fecal-derived microbiota transfers (FMT) for recurring Clostridium difficile infections, see: After Antibiotics, the Feces Pill Remains (Khazan, 2013) and Effectiveness of fecal-derived microbiota transfer using orally administered capsules for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (Hirsch et al, 2015).

 

 

About the Peggy Lillis Foundation:
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The mission of the Peggy Lillis Foundation is to build a nationwide clostridium difficile awareness movement by educating the public, empowering advocates, and shaping policy.
The PLF envisions a world where C. diff is rare, treatable and survivable.

 

What is Clostridium difficile infection?

“Clostridium difficile [pronounced Klo-STRID-ee-um dif-uh-SEEL], also known as “C. diff” [See-dif], is a germ that can cause diarrhea. Most cases of C. diff infection occur in patients taking antibiotics. The most common symptoms of a C. diff infection include:

  • Watery diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Belly pain and tenderness “
– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015

 

 

 

probiotics-vs-antibiotics

 

 

REFERENCES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015).  Clostridium difficile Infection Information for Patients. See: http://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cdiff/Cdiff-patient.html

Hirsch et al. (2015). Effectiveness of fecal-derived microbiota transfer using orally administered capsules for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. BMC Infectious Diseases, 15:191. See: http://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-015-0930-z

Khazan, O. (2013). After Antibiotics, the Feces Pill Remains. The Atlantic. See: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/12/after-antibiotics-the-feces-pill-remains/281925/

Lillis, C.J. (3/9/2016). Personal communication.

Peggy Lillis Foundation. (2016). See: http://peggyfoundation.org

 

 

© Copyright 2016. Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 

Certain Antibiotics Could Affect Gut Microbiome for 1 Year

Jansson WIRED ANTIBIOTIC MICROBIOME KILLER

 

The article below appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine’s MEDICINE WATCH two days ago. A big thank you to David Miller, MD, for bringing it to my attention today.

 

MEDICAL NEWS |
November 15, 2015

Certain Antibiotics Could Affect Gut Microbiome for 1 Year

By Kelly Young

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

Gut microbial diversity may be diminished for up to a year following oral antibiotic use, suggests a small, industry-conducted study published in mBio.

Sixty-six healthy participants in the U.K. and Sweden were randomized to receive placebo or an antibiotic (clindamycin, amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, or minocycline). They provided saliva and fecal samples before and after receiving antibiotics.

Over the long term, the salivary microbiome was largely undisturbed by antibiotic administration. Meanwhile, microbiome diversity in fecal samples was reduced for up to 4 months in patients receiving clindamycin and up to 12 months in those receiving ciprofloxacin. Specifically, bacteria that produce the short-chain fatty acid butyrate — which is linked to lower inflammation, carcinogenesis, and oxidative stress in the gut — were significantly reduced.

In addition, genetic testing found more genes associated with antibiotic resistance in the fecal samples.

The authors conclude: “Clearly, even a single antibiotic treatment in healthy individuals contributes to the risk of resistance development and leads to long-lasting detrimental shifts in the gut microbiome.”

 

REFERENCES

Young, K. (11/15/2015). Certain antibiotics could affect gut microbiome for 1 year. New England Journal of Medicine – MEDICINE WATCH. See: http://www.jwatch.org/fw110857/2015/11/15/certain-antibiotics-could-affect-gut-microbiome-1-year

 

 

© Copyright 2015 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.