Tag Archives: Diabetes

LOW FAT DAIRY & PARKINSON’S DISEASE

 

Source: Parkinson’s News Today

 

A recently published study led by Dr Katherine C. Hughes at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health provides evidence of a positive correlation between consumption of low-fat dairy products and risk of developing Parkinson’s, a serious autoimmune disease. Subjects who consumed three or more servings of low-fat dairy a day were found to have a 34% greater risk of developing Parkinson’s compared to those who consumed less than one serving a day.  Dr Hughes study is the largest analysis of dairy and Parkinson’s to date. (Hughes, 2017) & (Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, 2017)

Continue reading LOW FAT DAIRY & PARKINSON’S DISEASE

For a Healthy Mouth

 

Source: www.syracuseutdentistry.com)
(Source: www.syracuseutdentistry.com)

 

 

 

ORAL HEALTH AS A WINDOW TO OVERALL HEALTH

Thousands of studies have linked oral disease to systemic disease. Meaning, the health of your mouth, teeth and gums has a direct connection to health in the rest of your body. (Mercola, 8/27/2016)
Most of the billions of bacteria living in the mouth are harmless – even necessary for good health. Maintaining good oral health supports those good bacteria and enables the body’s natural defenses to keep bad bacteria under control. But, without proper oral hygiene, pathogenic bacteria can reach levels that lead to tooth decay and gum disease – and also create disease elsewhere in the body.
Additionally, medications such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics and antidepressants reduce saliva flow. Saliva helps wash away food particles and neutralize acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping protect against microbial invasion or overgrowth that could lead to disease. (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2016)
Pathogenic bacteria living in our oral cavities enter the blood stream  through a variety of daily activities, such as chewing, eating, brushing and flossing. Invasive dental treatments greatly increase the risk of pathogenic bacteria’s spreading elsewhere in the body via the blood stream. (Whiteman, 2013)

 

 

 

DISEASES LINKED TO ORAL HEALTH

Poor conditions in the mouth contribute to many problems elsewhere in the body, including:
  • Endocarditis. Endocarditis is a dangerous infection of the inner lining of the heart (the endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other pathogenic microbes from the mouth or elsewhere in the body  spread through the bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in the heart.
  • Cardiovascular disease. Research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke are linked to infections and the inflammation pathogenic oral bacteria can cause.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis (a set of inflammatory diseases affecting the tissues that surround and support the teeth) is linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Sjogren’s syndrome. Sjogren’s is an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth.
  • Diabetes. Diabetics have a  reduced resistance to infection and have more frequent and more severe gum disease.  Research has found that people with gum disease have a harder time controlling blood sugar levels and that regular periodontal care can improve diabetes control.
  • HIV/AIDS. HIV and AIDS are immunodeficiency conditions caused by the HIV virus. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis may be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss. Drugs used to treat osteoporosis carry a risk of damage to the bones of the jaw.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in the UK, discovered the presence of a bacterium called Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of patients who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s when they were alive. This bacterium is usually associated with chronic gum disease. Worsening oral health is generally seen as Alzheimer’s progresses.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. A strong link between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was found in a study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center. 70% of the RA patients had gum disease. In 30% the gum disease was severe. The population norm for gum disease is 35% with 5% having severe gum disease. Severe gum disease is often found in the early stages of RA. RA patients should get complete oral health exams regularly.
  • Head and neck cancers. A link between head and neck cancers and poor oral health at the time of oncology diagnosis has often been observed. A British group studied the oral health state of 100 people with head and neck cancers before beginning cancer treatment and found periodontal disease in 71% of the subjects who still had their teeth. The periodontal disease was severe in 51% of them. 61% of them had cavities in one or more teeth.
  • Eating disorders. Anorexia, bulimia and binge eating take their toll on oral health. Without proper nutrition, gums and other soft tissues in the mouth may bleed easily. Saliva glands may swell and cause chronic dry mouth. Repeated vomiting exposes teeth to strong stomach acid, causing lost tooth enamel and tooth edges to become thin and break off easily.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
Source: (American Dental Association, 2016), (Critchlow et al, 2014), (Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, 2015), (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2016), & (Whiteman, 2013)

 

 

(Source: www.implantnyc.com)
(Source: www.implantnyc.com)

 

 

 

 

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR ORAL HEALTH

Since the mouth is the “gateway to total body wellness” (Mercola, 8/27/2016), maintaining oral health – or restoring it if it has been compromised – is of utmost importance. Here are some suggestions for accomplishing that:

 

BRUSH YOUR TEETH PROPERLY AT LEAST TWICE A DAY
(Source: www.identalhub.com)
(Source: www.identalhub.com)

 

 

FLOSS DAILY
(Source: www.smile-la.com)
(Source: www.smile-la.com)

 

 

CONSUME A DIET CONSISTING OF REAL FOODS
A nutritious, balanced diet promotes healthy gums as well as a healthy body. In many cases, gum disease is directly connected to poor nutrition habits. Eat a well-balanced diet packed with plenty of protein, vitamins, and minerals. Vitamins C and B are both essential to healthy gums.

veg-board-with-real-food-rules1

 

 

 

SCHEDULE REGULAR DENTAL CHECKUPS AND CLEANINGS
– preferably with a biologic/holistic dentist who understands the connection between oral health and health in the rest of the body. And be sure to see your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises.

pg-scariest-dental-procedures-01-full

 

AVOID ANTIBACTERIAL MOUTHWASHES
“Your mouth is teeming with bacteria. It’s true. And it’s a good thing. There are more bacteria in your mouth than there are people on Earth. And a huge number of them actually benefit you by protecting against the more dangerous bacteria.
Bacteria“When you used an antibacterial mouthwash, it kills all kinds of bacteria, even the good ones! This can be the opportunity that the hazardous bacteria need to take over and start an infection. This is known as a “rebound effect.”
“Another side effect of bacteria loss is reduced production of nitrites (which help your blood vessels to expand and contract efficiently). A Swedish study linked lower nitrite production from antibacterial mouthwash to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.” (Blodgett, 2015)

“KILLS GERMS by up to 99.9%” for up to 12 hours – THIS IS NOT A GOOD THING

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USE AN IONIC TOOTHBRUSH
A manual or electric toothbrush mechanically removes plaque bacteria from the teeth but new studies have shown that ionic toothbrushes do a better job. Plaque biofilm is hard to brush off because it has a positive polarity while teeth have a negative polarity. Opposite charges attract and like charges repel. Much like dust is attracted to objects in our homes, plaque is attracted to our teeth.
An ionic toothbrush temporarily reverses the polarity of the tooth surfaces from negative to positive. This draws plaque towards the ionic toothbrush head, allowing the toothbrush to clear away more of it. As you use an ionic toothbrush, plaque is actively repelled by your now positively charged teeth and attracted to the negatively charged bristles – even in hard to reach areas that haven’t been touched by the brush – and acids in the mouth are neutralized. Research has found that ionic toothbrushes reduce hypersensitivity, plaque, and bleeding. (Parker, 2016)

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AVOID TOOTHPASTES CONTAINING TOXINS
Most toothpastes contain toxic ingredients – such as fluoride, parabens, sodium lauryl/laureth sulfate, triclosan, sodium hydroxide, bleaches and other harsh chemicals  These chemicals damage the body as a whole and can  impair the good probiotic bacteria in the mouth.
Switch instead to an herbal toothpaste that’s free of metals and carcinogens. Look for ingredients such as eucalyptus, licorice, neem, clove and peppermint – natural antibacterial agents and breath fresheners.
Here’s an example of an effective, healthier toothpaste:
Auromere Ayurvedic Toothpaste
Auromere toothpaste

From Auromére’s website:

Auromére ‘s highly effective line of Ayurvedic toothpaste combines the natural fibre PEELU with the astringent and invigorating properties of NEEM and 24 other barks, roots, plants and flowers which have been esteemed for centuries by Ayurvedic specialists for maintaining optimum dental hygiene. The all-natural botanical extracts and essential oils in Auromére Toothpaste are prized for their astringent, cleansing properties that help freshen breath and leave teeth feeling squeaky clean. In addition, Auromére Toothpaste contains no fluoride, gluten, artificial sweeteners, dyes or harsh chemicals commonly found in many toothpastes.

Free of fluoride, gluten, bleaches, artificial sweeteners, dyes, and animal ingredients.

Concentrated formula: Each tube lasts 3 times longer than other brands!

Available in 5 varieties: Licorice,  Freshmint,  Mint-Free,  Foam-Free Cardamom-Fennel, and Foam-Free Freshmint.

 

USE AN ORAL IRRIGATOR
Oral irrigation removes plaque that tooth brushing doesn’t reach – from below the gum line. My favorite oral irrigator, and the one recommended by holistic/biologic dentist Reid Winick, DDS,  is made by Hydrofloss. I use it at night before bedtime and can feel the difference when I’m away from it while traveling.
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USE AN ORAL PROBIOTIC
Keeping an adequate supply of good probiotic bacteria living in your mouth defends against over growths of bad  pathogenic bacteria. Using an oral probiotic lozenge after you’ve cleaned your mouth before bedtime aids in maintaining dental and periodental health, reducing the incidence of inflammation and infections.
Here are two examples of high quality oral probiotic lozenges:

EvoraPro® Oral Probiotics for Dental Professionals

(Source: ramonadental.com)
(Source: ramonadental.com)
  • A product of more than 30 years of probiotic research by industry leader ProBiora Health
  • Features a patented, proprietary, extra-strength blend of beneficial bacteria, ProBiora3®
  • The blend of beneficial bacteria in EvoraPro are ones naturally found in healthy mouths

Life Extension Florassist Oral Hygiene

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  • An oral probiotic that provides the beneficial bacteria that can help block harmful bacteria that first develop in the mouth
  • Allows the healthy and naturally occurring organisms found in the body to out-compete the harmful bacteria
  • Contains BLIS K12 and Bacillus coagulans, a unique blend of two oral probiotics
USE A TONGUE SCRAPER
A fast way to get bad bacteria out of your mouth is with a tongue scraper. This is a traditional Ayurvedic technique for removing bacterial build-up, food debris, fungi, and dead cells from the surface of the tongue. The technique cleans the mouth, freshens the breath, and also stimulates the metabolism.

(Source: www.ayurvedicbazaar.com)

(Source: www.ayurvedicbazaar.com)

 

 

 

DRINK GREEN TEA
Green tea not only protects against radiation, boosts mineralization of bones, and helps with weight loss, it also promotes healthy teeth and gums. High levels of catechin, an antioxidant, seem to be responsible for green tea’s ability to reduce inflammation in the body, including the mouth.
Source: www.pinterest.com)
Source: www.pinterest.com)

 

 

 

TRY CAMU CAMU FOR ITS HIGH VITAMIN C CONTENT
Vitamin C’s positive impact on oral health is well known.  “In fact, the use of vitamin C in dental disease is one of the earliest recorded uses of nutrient therapy in Western medicine. In 1747, a British Naval physician named James Lind noticed that lime juice, which is rich in vitamin C, helped prevent scurvy, which causes tooth loss. As a result, British sailors bottled lime juice for gum disease prevention. Incidentally, this practice later gave rise to the term ‘Limey’.” (Life Extension, 2016)
An interesting source of vitamin C is a fruit called camu camu that’s native to the Peruvian and Brazilian rain forests. It has an exceptionally high vitamin C content. Vitamin C boosts the immune system and reduces the incidence of bleeding gums, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Other benefits are repairing and maintaining cartilage and bones throughout the body and improving the texture of the skin.
Raw, Organic Camu Camu Powder
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EXPERIMENT WITH OIL PULLING
Oil pulling is a highly effective method of detoxifying the oral cavity. Swishing a tablespoon of oil (preferably organic coconut oil, but olive or sesame can also be used) around in the mouth for 10-20 minutes removes the toxins, leaving an oral environment where healthy saliva flows properly to prevent cavities and disease. Research has shown that oil pulling reduces plaque-induced gingivitis and the bacterium Streptococcus mutans, a known cause of cavities.
The first synthetic bristled toothbrush so familiar to us now first went on sale on February 24, 1938, but oil pulling has been used for centuries in India as a traditional remedy to:
  • Cure tooth decay
  • Kill bad breath
  • Heal bleeding gums
  • Prevent heart disease
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Whiten teeth
  • Soothe throat dryness
  • Prevent cavities
  • Heal cracked lips
  • Boost the Immune system
  • Improve acne
  • Strengthen the gums and jaw
See Dr Josh Axe’s Coconut Oil Pulling Benefits & How-to Guide for more information on the benefits of coconut oil pulling plus a useful how-to video.

 

(Source: draxe.com)
(Source: draxe.com)
Sources: (Axe, 2016), (Felts, 2014), (Life Extension, 2016),  (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2016), (Mercola, 8/27/2016), & (Winick, 2016)

 

 

(Source: seniorsoralhealth.org)
(Source: seniorsoralhealth.org)

 

 “Pathogens are now being recognized as resident microbes that are out of balance … (T)he same bacteria that keep us alive can have a pathogenic expression when disturbed.

“I have been tooting the horn about getting out of the ‘pesticide business.’ I’m also speaking about natural pesticides. Not just triclosan, clorhexidin and those synthetic types, but also tea tree oil, tulsi oil, oregano oil and other antimicrobial oils that … have a potent disturbing effect on the oral microbiome.

“In the mouth, you don’t want to have a ‘scorched earth policy,’ nuking all bacteria and hoping the good bugs come back … (G)ood bugs basically have a harder chance of setting up a healthy-balanced microbiome when you disturb them, denature then, or dehydrate them with alcohol-based products.”

– Biologic dentist Gerry Curatola, DDS (quoted in Mercola, 8/27/2016)

 

 

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“(T)housands of studies have linked oral disease to systemic disease.
‘Inflammation is known to be a disease-causing force leading to most chronic illness, and gum disease and other oral diseases produce chronic low-grade inflammation that can have a deleterious effect on every major organ system in your body.
‘Oral disease can therefore contribute to diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer’s, just to name a few. Advanced gum disease can raise your risk of a fatal heart attack up to 10 times. And, according to Curatola, if you get a heart attack related to gum disease, 9 times out of 10 it will be fatal.
‘There’s also a 700 percent higher incidence of type 2 diabetes among those with gum disease, courtesy of the inflammatory effects of unbalanced microflora in your mouth.” (Mercola, 8/27/2016

 

(Source: www.australiadental.com.au)
(Source: www.australiadental.com.au)

 

For more information on oral health, see these earlier posts:

Oral Health and Overall Health

Oral Health, Thermography and Inflammation

Is Antiseptic Mouthwash Harming Your Heart?

Vitamin C for Tooth Pain

Root Canals and Breast Cancer

For more information on how ionic toothbrushes work, see:

The Science Behind Ionic Toothbrushes

 

 

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Many thanks to Anne Mercer Larson and Morrie Sherry for suggesting I write on this topic as a follow up to my Root Canals and Breast Cancer post.

 

(Source: healthybodylife.com)
(Source: healthybodylife.com)

 

 

 

REFERENCES

American Dental Association. (2016). Eating Disorders. See: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/e/eating-disorders

Axe, J. (2016). Coconut Oil Pulling Benefits & How-to Guide. See: https://draxe.com/oil-pulling-coconut-oil/

Blodgett, K. (2015). Is Mouthwash Bad for You? Blodgett Dental Care. See: http://www.blodgettdentalcare.com/blog/is-mouthwash-bad-for-you/

Critchlow, S.B. et al. (2014). The oral health status of pre-treatment head and neck cancer patients. British Dental Journal, 1:216. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24413141

Felts, L. (2014). DETOX YOUR MOUTH: 9 HOLISTIC TREATMENTS FOR ORAL HEALTH. See: http://thechalkboardmag.com/detox-your-mouth-9-holistic-oral-health-treatments

Hardin, J.R. (3/14/2014). Is Antiseptic Mouthwash Harming Your Heart? See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/03/14/antiseptic-mouthwash-harming-heart/

Hardin, J.R. (2/16/2014). Oral Health and Overall Health.  See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/02/16/oral-health-overall-health/

Hardin, J.R. (2/16/2014). Oral Health, Thermography and Inflammation.  See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/02/16/oral-health-thermography-inflammation/

Hardin, J.R. (7/31/2016). Vitamin C for Tooth Pain. See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2016/07/31/vitamin-c-toothache/

Hardin, J.R. (8/22/2016). Root Canals & Breast Cancer. See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2016/08/22/root-canals-breast-cancer/

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center. (2015). Dental Health and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Research Update. See: http://www.hopkinsarthritis.org/arthritis-news/ra-news/dental-health-and-rheumatoid-arthritis-a-research-update/

Life Extension. (2016). Periodontitis and Cavities. See: http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/peandca.html

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2016). Oral health: A window to your overall health. See: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

Mercola, R.  (8/27/2016). For Optimal Health, Mind Your Oral Microbiome and Avoid Fluoride, Harsh Mouth Rinses and Amalgam Fillings. See: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/08/27/optimize-your-oral-microbiome-avoid-fluoride.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20160827Z1_B&et_cid=DM117251&et_rid=1638888152

Parker, K. (2016). The Science Behind Ionic Toothbrushes. See: http://www.holistic-healing-information.com/ionic-toothbrushes.html

Whiteman, H. (2013). Alzheimer’s disease linked to poor dental health. See: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264164.php

Winick, R. (2016). Five Steps You Can Take to Naturally Promote Healthy Gums and Prevent Disease. Dentistry for Health NY. See: http://www.dentistryforhealthny.com/PromoteHealth

 

 

 

© Copyright 2016. Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 

Prediabetics Have Fewer Gut Bacteria

Updated 8/29/2014,  9/7/2015, and 4/15/2016.  NOTE added at end of post on 9/6/2015. Last updated 10/22/2016.

diabetic

In the global diabetes epidemic, rates of new cases are rising rapidly. I hope this post will help you avoid becoming one of them.

 

Number of People Diagnosed with Diabetes

Millions, by region

MC_1403_outlook

Source: IDF Diabetes Atlas, Sixth Edition; Managed Care calculation of percentages using data from The World Factbook, published by the CIA

TYPES 1 & 2 DIABETES: AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

 

(Source: igennus.com)
(Source: igennus.com)
During digestion, most of our food gets broken down into glucose (a form of sugar that’s the body’s main source of fuel), which then  passes into the bloodstream. Insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas) must also be present in the blood for glucose to be able to make it into our cells to nourish them.
Type 1 diabetes is known to be a serious autoimmune problem of the metabolism. An autoimmune disorder or disease is a result of chronic inflammation in the body’s immune system, causing it to turn against a part of the body – to attack it as if its cells were dangerous, invading pathogens. In Type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. (WebMD, 2008)
Type 2 diabetes is now also largely viewed as the result of a different type of  autoimmune reaction: one in which B and T immune cells cause inflammation in the fatty tissue surrounding organs in the body. The inflammation occurs when rapidly growing fat cells outstrip their blood supply and begin to die off. These dying cells spew out their contents, and macrophages (another type of immune cell) are called in to clean up the dead cells. “The resulting onslaught by the immune system inhibits the ability of the remaining fat cells to respond to insulin and causes fatty acids to be shed into the blood. This sets in motion a physiological cascade that leads to fatty liver disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and further insulin resistance throughout the body.” (Conger, 2011)

 

 

TYPE 1 DIABETES

(Source: www.imagekb.com)
(Source: www.imagekb.com)
In Type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes, the immune system mistakenly kills off pancreatic cells that make the blood-sugar-regulating hormone insulin. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys these pancreatic cells so they no longer make enough insulin.
Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 10% of diagnosed diabetes in the US.

 

 

TYPE 2 DIABETES

In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas usually produces enough insulin but the cells in the body have become unable to make effective use of the hormone, a condition called insulin resistance. Insulin production eventually decreases. So, as in Type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood instead of being properly delivered to the cells in the body where they’re needed for fuel.
(Source: www.webmd.com)
(Source: www.webmd.com)
Type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity, older age, family history of gestational diabetes, and physical inactivity. About 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. Unfortunately, Type 2 diabetes is also increasingly being seen in younger people, even children and teens.

 

 

PREDIABETES

(Source: prediabetescenters.com)
(Source: prediabetescenters.com)
A prediabetic condition indicates the amount of glucose in the blood is above normal but not yet high enough to be called diabetes. Prediabetic people are at greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

 

 

 

DIABETES STATISTICS IN THE US

 

(Source: eschooltoday.com)

Statistics from the American Diabetes Association Report, 2014 show the magnitude of the problem in the US:
  • PREVALENCE: In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes.
    • Approximately 1.25 million American children and adults have type 1 diabetes.
  • UNDIAGNOSED: Of the 29.1 million, 21.0 million were diagnosed and another 8.1 million were undiagnosed.
  • PREVALENCE IN SENIORS: The percentage of Americans age 65 and older remains high, at 25.9%, or 11.8 million seniors (diagnosed and undiagnosed).
  • NEW CASES: The incidence of diabetes in 2012 was 1.7 million new diagnoses/year; in 2010 it was 1.9 million.
  • PREDIABETES: In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes; this is up from 79 million in 2010.
  • DEATHS:  Based on the 69,071 death certificates in which diabetes was listed as the underlying cause of death in 2010, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the United States that year. In 2010, diabetes was also mentioned as a cause of death in a total of 234,051 certificates.

CAUSE OF DEATH UNDER REPORTING

  • Diabetes may be under reported as a cause of death. Studies have found that only about 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had diabetes listed anywhere on the death certificate and only about 10-15% had it listed as the underlying cause of death.

DIABETES IN YOUTH

  • About 208,000 Americans under age 20 are estimated to have diagnosed diabetes, approximately 0.25% of that population.
  • In 2008—2009, the annual incidence of diagnosed diabetes in youth was estimated at 18,436 with Type 1 diabetes, 5,089 with Type 2 diabetes.

 

population-with-diabetes

 

Some other diabetes statistics showing the seriousness of the problem:

(Source: cached.newslookup.com)

 

(Source: cached.newslookup.com)

 

diabetes-cost

 

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Below are diabetes prevalence data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The number of reported cases tripled between 1980 and 2008. The CDC estimates that “the number of Americans with diabetes will range from 1 in 3 to 1 in 5 by 2050.”

 

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And here’s information from the International Diabetes Federation comparing reported cases of diabetes in 2013 with projected cases by 2035 for countries around the world – an expected increase of 55%.

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GUT BACTERIA & DIABETES

 

(Source: blog.medbiomarkers.com)
(Source: blog.medbiomarkers.com)
Researchers are discovering changes in normal gut bacteria that take place before either Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes turns into a clinical condition. Since we now know that 70-80% of our immune system is located in our GI tract, where digestion takes place, you can see how a serious imbalance in the bacterial make up of the gut microbiome could lead to the development of diabetes in people with a genetic predisposition for it.

(Source: ink361.com)

 “Mounting evidence suggests that the bacteria resident within our GI tract – and the immune response to those bacteria – influence the permeability of the gut mucosa. This idea — which has become to be known as the “leaky gut” hypothesis  — proposes that a cycle of dysbiosis, dysregulated immune response, and unintended gut permeability leads to the peripheral host immune system being unbalanced towards a pro-inflammatory response. This in turn is suggested to lead to (some of) the imbalances that are thought to be causative of diabetes and other non-metabolic disorders.” (Moore, 2015)

 

 

 

GUT BACTERIA, ANTIBIOTICS & RISK FOR DIABETES

 

(Source: probiotics.org)
(Source: probiotics.org)
A team of scientists led by Dr Ben Boursi, a Post Doctoral Researcher in Gastroenterology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, found people who have taken multiple courses of antibiotics were 37% more likely to develop Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The team also found the greater the number of courses of antibiotics, the higher the risk for developing diabetes.
Dr Boursi notes, “Our findings are important, not only for understanding how diabetes may develop, but as a warning to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatments that might do more harm than good.”

 

(Source: www.asnailsodyssey.com)
(Source: www.asnailsodyssey.com)
Several studies in humans have shown that early childhood exposure to antibiotics is associated with increased risk of obesity in later life – and obesity has long been recognized as risk for developing diabetes.
There’s also growing evidence that imbalances in the gut microbiome’s composition contribute to the development of both Type 1 and 2 diabetes.
The Boursi team’s future research will focus on identifying the species of gut bacteria necessary to prevent and reverse diabetes, potentially working towards the possibility of transplanting prebiotic and probiotic microbes into the gut as a therapeutic strategy for diabetes. (Arendt, 2015) & (Davenport, 2015)

 

 

PREDIABETICS HAVE FEWER & LESS DIVERSE GUT BACTERIA

 

(Source: www.mayo.edu)
(Source: www.mayo.edu),
A research team led by Dr Elena Barengolts, an Endocrinologist at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, found irregularities in the composition of the probiotic bacteria in the guts of prediabetic patients: Compared with subjects whose glucose tolerance was good, the prediabetics had fewer and less diverse populations of bacteria living in their gut microbiomes.
There were 116 participants in the study, all African-American veterans. Their ages ranged from 45 to 70. Their intestinal bacteria were measured by stool samples at the start of the study and again 12 months later.
Participants were divided into four groups based on their body’s ability to regulate blood sugar:
  • Group 1 – Those with stable glucose tolerance (normal)
  • Group 2 – Those with stable impaired fasting glucose or stable impaired glucose tolerance
  • Group 3 – Those with worsened glucose tolerance
  • Group 4 – Those with improved glucose tolerance
The study found that men whose blood sugar control  remained normal over the year (Group 1) had higher numbers of beneficial gut bacteria while the men who continued to be prediabetic had fewer beneficial bacteria and higher numbers of harmful bacteria in their guts.
Furthermore, the group whose blood sugar management improved over the course of the year (Group 4) had a higher number of a strain of healthy bacteria (Akkermansia) than the group who had maintained normal blood sugar control over the year (Group 1). (Gray, 2015)

 

(Source: humanfoodproject.com)
(Source: humanfoodproject.com)
At the phylum level, this study found significant differences in the bacterial composition between Groups 1 and 2: Group 2 (people with impaired but stable fasting glucose or glucose tolerance) had higher levels of Bacteroidetes and lower levels of Firmicutes than people in Group 1.
The Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio was 1.9 vs 0.9 respectively for Groups 1 and 2 and 1.9 vs 1.1 respectively for Groups 1 and 3.
The number of Proteobacteria decreased over the 12-month study period in Groups 2 and 4 compared with Group 1. Proteobacteria are a major phylum of gram-negative bacteria that include a variety of pathogens – such as Escherichia, Salmonella, Vibrio, Helicobacter, and Yersinia. (Wikipedia, 2015)

 

(Source: www.yourwildlife.org)
(Source: www.yourwildlife.org)
At the family and genus levels, Group 2 had fewer Prevotella and a higher Bacteroides/Prevotella ratio than Group 1: 5.6 vs 2.7. Group 2 also had fewer   Enterobacteriaceae (a large family of  bacteria that includes the pathogens Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia pestis, Klebsiella and Shigella) and  more Ruminococcae and Veillonellaceae.
“We speculate that lower abundance of Prevotella may be associated with worsening glycemia, and, conversely, higher abundance of Akkermansia might be associated with improving glycemia, thus corroborating suggestions from previous studies,” the researchers said.
Barengolts notes, “Changes in the gut microbiota occur in the early stage of diabetes development. The gut bacteria signature — the composition and abundance — could be a useful tool in assessing a person’s risk for developing obesity and diabetes.” (Ciubotaru et al, 2015) & (Brown, 2015)
Other studies are currently underway in Italy and China investigating gut bacterial transplants as a treatment for diabetes.

 

 

ALTERED GUT BACTERIA PRECEDE TYPE 1 DIABETES IN CHILDREN

 

(Source: www.nlm.nih.gov)
(Source: www.nlm.nih.gov)

 

A small study followed 33 babies from Finland and Estonia who were at increased genetic risk for developing Type 1 diabetes. Analysis of their stool samples charted changes in the multitude of microorganisms living in their guts.
By age three, four of the children developed Type 1 diabetes.  Huge alterations in the gut microbes of those those four children were seen about a year before onset of the disease. As with the men in the veterans’ study, there was a marked drop in the diversity of the overall microbial community. This drop in gut diversity was accompanied by spikes in inflammation-favoring organisms, gene functions, and serum and stool metabolites. These changes in gut microbial levels did not occur in the at risk children who didn’t progress to Type 1 diabetes.
Researcher Dr Aleksandar Kostic, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Computational Biology and Experimental Biology at MIT and Harvard, hopes the study’s results will lead to an early diagnostic test for Type 1 diabetes. (Kostic et al, 2015) & (Norton, 2015)

 

 

PREVENTING & TREATING DIABETES VIA THE GUT MICROBIOME?

 

Bacteria in the Human Gut

(Source: ehp.niehs.nih.gov)
(Source: ehp.niehs.nih.gov)
Given what we already know about the gut microbiome’s role in keeping the body in a balanced state so it remains healthy, it makes sense to focus on diet and nutritional supplements for preventing and treating diabetes.
For example, we know there is considerable variation among people in the microbes that live in and on us. We also know that an individual’s microbial populations are always changing.
The following is from an easy to read summary of changes in the various human microbiomes from birth through old age. It was prepared by the University of Utah’s Genetic Science Learning Center (2015). You might want to take a look at it – it provides useful information along with some delightful drawings:

“Before birth, we’re all more or less sterile—we have no microbes. Within a few years, we’re covered in thousands of different species of microbes, and they colonize every millimeter of the body that’s exposed to the outside world. By the time we enter kindergarten, we have vastly different populations living in the different habitats around our bodies. Even as adults and into old age, our microbiota continue to shift.

” … Because so many things affect our bodies’ ecosystems, there is a huge amount of variability in microbial populations even among individuals of the same age. Just like our fingerprints vary, we vary in the microbial species we have as well as their relative abundancies. Our microbes vary with gender, diet, climate, age, occupation, and hygiene. Even differences in our genes influence our microbial populations—indirectly by affecting things like the acidity of the digestive tract, and also more directly through variations in proteins on our cells that communicate with microbes.

“Even with all this variability, there are some trends. Microbial populations differ more among body sites than between individuals. For example, the microbes living on the forearms of two different people tend to be more similar than the microbes on the forearm and ear of the same person. And there are certain species of bacteria that will only live in the gut, others that will live only on the teeth, and so on.”

 

GENETICS VS EPIGENETICS

 

(Source: thescienceofreality.tumblr.com)
(Source: thescienceofreality.tumblr.com)
We also know this about autoimmune diseases: DNA IS NOT DESTINY
Chronic diseases, especially autoimmune ones, are only 25% determined by genetic inheritance. The other 75% is affected by other factors. It’s a matter of genetics vs epigenetics. You may have a genetic predisposition for diabetes but also have a large say in whether your DNA expresses that predisposition in your body.

“We know from twin studies, from identical twin studies, that 25% of autoimmunity is your genetics, and 75% is from the environment. … So that’s an enormous amount that we have control over and can influence.”

  • Amy Myers, MD. (Sanfilippo, 2015)
If we know that both the composition and abundance of micro-organisms living in our guts  change over the course of a lifetime, shouldn’t it be possible to learn how to make deliberate changes to our gut microbiome – changes that prevent diabetes from developing even if we have a genetic predisposition for it?

 

epigenetics-4-728

 

 

 

TO AVOID OR REVERSE INSULIN RESISTANCE

 

images

These are Dr Robert Mercola’s suggestions for turning insulin resistance around (Mercola, 8/23/2015) & (Mercola, 8/27/2015):

 

AVOID SUGAR
(Source: www.sugarauthority.com)
(Source: www.sugarauthority.com)

 

 

EAT REAL FOODS INSTEAD OF PROCESSED ONES

Realfood-1

Almost all so-called foods that come in a bottle, can, jar, bag, or box have had sugars added to them, usually in the form of high fructose corn syrup.

 

 

EAT FRESH FRUIT INSTEAD OF PURCHASED FRUIT JUICES
(Source: www.foodinsight.org)
(Source: www.foodinsight.org)
Commercial fruit juices are loaded with added sugar.

 

 

AVOID “DIET” FOODS AND DRINKS
2565d7867d26310efcd15a313fef51ec
They promote insulin resistance and other health problems. “The artificial sweeteners saccharin, sucralose, and aspartame decrease function in pathways associated with the transport of sugar in your body, and can induce both gut dysbiosis and glucose intolerance. Research also shows that artificial sweeteners promote diabetes and weight gain by disrupting your gut microbiome. Sucralose (Splenda) was found to reduce beneficial gut bacteria by as much as 50 percent!”

 

AVOID GRAINS, ESPECIALLY WHEAT, BARLEY, OATS & RYE
(Source: www.thepaleomom.com)
(Source: www.thepaleomom.com)
Grains turn into sugar in your body, sharply raising your glucose and insulin levels, and contribute to insulin resistance. Many grains also contain gluten, which triggers inflammation in the intestines, leading to a state of chronic inflammation in the body and autoimmune diseases.
Consuming a lot of refined grains (and even whole grains) is also highly inflammatory for another reason:  Humans are designed to eat a diet containing a ratio of 1 or 2 parts of Omega-6 essential fatty acids to every 1 part of Omega-3. This ratio is what we get when we eat real, unprocessed, highly nutritious foods – non-GMO veggies, fruits, nuts, seeds, and pastured animals. Our typical diet now has come to contain 10 to 20 parts Omega-6 to every part Omega-3 – producing a highly inflammatory state in the body. (Kratka, 2011)
“Grains are almost single-handedly responsible for the removal of omega-3 fatty acids in the modern diet….  There have been over 2000 studies done on omega-3 and for good reason: the omega-3s in our diet (or the lack their of) have massive implications on our health.  It all boils down to ratios: the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids in your diet is so crucial, it goes down to the cellular level.” (Kratka, 2011)
Better alternatives to grains are non-GMO almond meal, coconut flour, buckwheat groats, and sweet potatoes. They are much gentler on your blood sugar than grains. Mercola points out that even these healthier alternatives will hamper your body’s ability to heal if you’re already insulin resistant. “Once the clinical signs of insulin resistance have resolved, you can relax your carb restriction.”
In addition to the Omega-3s in my diet, I take Standard Process Tuna Omega-3 Oil (1 2X/day).

 

 

FOCUS ON HEALTHY FATS
(Source:www.skinnydivadiet.com )
(Source:www.skinnydivadiet.com )
Eat fewer saturated and trans fats (unhealthy) and more mono and poly unsaturated fats (healthy).  Examples of healthy fats include avocado, butter made from raw grass-fed organic milk, cheese, raw dairy, organic pastured eggs, raw nuts, grass-fed meats, and coconut oil.

 

(Source: www.familygonehealthy.com)
(Source: www.familygonehealthy.com)

 

Due to the high percentage of nutrient-poor foods, refined carbohydrates, bad fats, and refined sugars in the Standard American Diet (SAD), along with consumption of multiple OTC and prescription pharmaceuticals, we are far from getting the optimal ratio of 1:1 for Omega-6s (inflammatory) and Omega-3s (anti-inflammatory). The ratio in our modern Western diet is often as high as 20:1, creating excessive, chronic inflammation in the body – and chronic inflammation is a precursor to many diseases.

 

(Source: www.betterhealthinternational.com )
(Source: www.betterhealthinternational.com )

 

 

GET ENOUGH VITAMIN D3
Having a sufficient blood level of Vitamin D is essential for maintaining good health and preventing a wide range of autoimmune and neurological diseases: Type 1 and 2 diabetes, asthma, allergies, cancer, Alzheimer’s, MS, susceptibility to infection (including viral respiratory infections) among them.
(Source: jdshometraining.com)
(Source: jdshometraining.com)
Vitamin D3 is vitally important for healthy immune functioning – and most of us are seriously D3 deficient. Unless we work mostly naked outdoors in a sunny climate without slathering our skin with sunscreen, we can benefit greatly from adding a high quality D3 supplement to our daily diets.
Some good sources of Vitamin D3 are:
Exposure of the skin to sunshine (without sunscreen), salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines, cod liver oil, egg yolks, cheeses, butter, shiitake and button mushrooms, sunflower seeds and sprouts, and high quality supplements.
(Source: www.alzinfo.org) In addition to sunshine, you can get vitamin D from salmon, tuna, mackerel, cod liver oil, egg yolks, low fat milk, non-dairy milk alternatives, 100 percent orange juice and supplements.
(Source: www.alzinfo.org)
Guidelines for the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of vitamin D were updated by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2010 and are currently set by age: For those 1-70 years of age, 600 IU daily; for those 71 years and older, 800 IU daily; and for pregnant and lactating women, 600 IU daily.  This is thought by many as far too low.
Due to a mathematical error, the IOM’s widely cited RDA’s for Vitamin D underestimate the body’s need for it by a factor of 10.
The IOM recommends a Vitamin D serum level of 20 ng/ml but we should actually aim for a blood level of 40 ng/ml, supplementing with whatever amount is necessary to reach and maintain that level. (Mercola, 5/10/2015)
See The Real RDA for Vitamin D Is 10 Times Higher Than Currently Recommended for information on how how the RDA for Vitamin D should be correctly calculated and how to get an adequate amount of it.

 

VitaminD

One of my alternative health care providers recommends 5,000 IU/day in the summer time and as high as 10,000 IU/day the rest of the year. (Miller, 2011). I like Metagenics, D3 5000, 120 Softgels (1 2X/day). 
Vitamin D serum levels should be monitored with periodic blood tests.
(4/15/2016: I reduced my D3 intake to 5,000 IU/day after my D blood serum level was too high.)
(10/22/2016: A few months ago, I needed to reduce my D3 intake even further – to 5,000 IU/day during the darker months and the same amount every other day during the sunnier months.)

 

See Alzheimer’s and Vitamin D Deficiency and Whole Food Supplements (Bio-available) vs OTC (Synthetic) Vitamins for additional information on Vitamin D3.

 

SIT LESS/EXERCISE MORE
(Source: www.drannblog.com)
(Source: www.drannblog.com)
Over 10,000 studies show that prolonged sitting harms your health. 8-10 hours of sitting a day, even if you exercise 30-60 minutes daily and are very fit, promotes dozens of chronic diseases – including obesity and Type 2 diabetes.
“The reason for this is because, at the molecular level, the human body was designed to be active all day long. When you stop moving and sit still for extended periods of time, it’s like telling your body to shut down and prepare for death. As soon as you stand up, a number of molecular cascades occur that promote and support healthy biological functioning.
“For example, within 90 seconds of standing up, the muscular and cellular systems that process blood sugar, triglycerides, and cholesterol — which are mediated by insulin — are activated.  Surprising as it may sound, all of these molecular effects are activated simply by carrying your body weight upon your legs. These cellular mechanisms are also responsible for pushing fuels into your cells and, if done regularly, will radically decrease your risk of diabetes and obesity.
“So, the remedy is simple: Avoid sitting and get more movement into your life. Ideally, aim to sit less than three hours a day. Also consider walking more, in addition to your exercise regimen. In short, rest is supposed to break up activity — not the other way around. This kind of non-exercise physical movement appears to be really foundational for optimal health, and if you’re currently inactive, this is the place to start even before you get going on a workout routine.” (Mercola, 8/23/2015)

 

Sitting-vs-Exercise

 

 

Don’t let this be true for you:
(Source: http://www.medpagetoday.com) )
(Source: http://www.medpagetoday.com)

 

 

NOTE ADDED ON 9/6/2015

I’d asked Warren Fraser, MD, to look over this post. Dr Fraser is an experienced board certified endocrinologist and Co-Chair of the Institutional Review Board at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, LA.  He sent these helpful comments:

I think your post is very good.

I hadn’t thought of autoimmune diseases as being a result of chronic inflammation, but it makes sense.  It’s seems as if more and more disorders are being linked to chronic inflammation.  Cardiovascular disease has, and one of the studies I reviewed this week is looking at a drug which reduces chronic inflammation (the drug is already approved for use in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, now commonly called Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis) to see if it will lower the incidence of a second cardiovascular event in people who have had one heart attack.

In reference to the TYPE 2 DIABETES SECTION:

The pancreas actually over secretes insulin in the early phases of the disease to combat the insulin resistance.  This was quite a surprise to investigators when the insulin assay was developed (late 60’s or early 70’s I think).  As you pointed out, insulin production eventually decreases, which may be due to, at least in part, pancreatic ‘exhaustion’ from chronic hypersecretion.  High insulin levels are almost always seen in prediabetes (insulin resistance syndrome) and measuring insulin levels is useful in making the diagnosis.

In reference to the section on DIABETES STATISTICS IN THE US:

The increase in new cases may be due in part to a greater awareness of the disorder and more people being tested for it.

I certainly concur that diabetes is under reported as a cause of death.  The cause is often attributed to a complication of the diabetes.  Back in the 80’s, when Lee Iacocca addressed the annual meeting of American Diabetes Association, he said that he wanted his wife’s death certificate to tell the truth:  she died from diabetes.

In reference to the section on GUT BACTERIA, ANTIBIOTICS & RISK FOR DIABETES:

I certainly agree with the harmful effects of excessive antibiotic use.

Again, this is a very good review and my comments aren’t meant to be suggestions to change anything.

– Fraser, 2016

 

GMO vs NON-GMO FOODS:

In the section AVOID GRAINS, ESPECIALLY WHEAT, BARLEY, OATS & RYE, I’d written “Humans are designed to eat a diet containing a ratio of 1 or 2 parts of Omega-6 essential fatty acids to every part of Omega-3. This ratio is what we get when we eat real, unprocessed, highly nutritious foods – non-GMO veggies, fruits, nuts, seeds, and pastured animals. Our typical diet now has come to contain 10 to 20 parts Omega-6 to every part of Omega-3 – producing a highly inflammatory state in the body.”
Dr Fraser also asked for clarification on the meaning of “non-GMO”. Here it is with respect to the foods we consume:
The short answer is that NON-GMO plant foods are ones that have not been genetically modified and NON-GMO animals are ones that have not been fed genetically engineered grains or other plants.
GMO foods have been genetically engineered, for reasons completely unrelated to health or nourishment, to withstand heavy applications of potent herbicides like Monsanto’s Roundup (a glyphosate-based weed killer). GMOs are created using the gene-splicing techniques of biotechnology to inject DNA from one species into another species, creating combinations of plant, animal, bacteria, and viral genes that don’t occur in nature or through crossbreeding methods.
Glyphosate  causes serious damage to the beneficial microbes living in our guts (our gut microbiome) and is regarded by many scientists as the most important factor in the development of the many chronic diseases and conditions plaguing Westernized societies.
The process of genetically modifying foods is relatively new in agriculture. The first genetically modified seeds for commercial use were planted in the US in 1996. In 2014, 18 million farmers in 28 countries planted biotech crops, with the highest acreage by far here in the US. Worldwide planting of GE crops covered 181.5 million hectares (448 million acres) by 2014.

 

 

The Center for Food Safety estimates that about 3/4 of all grocery store products now contain one or more genetically modified ingredients.
England, France, Germany, New Zealand, Switzerland, China, Indonesia, and more than 25 other countries around the world require GE foods to be labeled so consumers can choose to avoid them. England, Japan, Brazil, Norway, India, Thailand and some other countries have even completely banned some GE food crops.
Monsanto and the other big biotech companies have joined together to spend huge sums of money to make sure these GMO foods remain unlabeled in the US.
The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) has declared genetically engineered food unsafe for consumption. They cited animal studies indicating serious health risks associated with GM foods – “including infertility, immune problems, accelerated aging, faulty insulin regulation, and changes in major organs and the gastrointestinal system. The AAEM advised physicians to tell their patients to avoid GM foods.
“Before the FDA decided to allow GMOs into food without labeling, FDA scientists had repeatedly warned that GM foods can create unpredictable, hard-to-detect side effects, including allergies, toxins, new diseases, and nutritional problems. They urged long-term safety studies, but were ignored.” (Institute for Responsible Technology, 2014)
Studies of people in the US and Germany have found high levels of glyphosate in human urine, blood, and breast milk as well as in drinking water supplies.
For more information on GMO vs NON-GMO, see:

 

 

Intestines of Pig Fed NO GMOs vs Pig Fed GMOs

(Source: isupportorganic.blogspot.com)
(Source: isupportorganic.blogspot.com)

 

 

 

REFERENCES

American Diabetes Association. (2015). Statistics About Diabetes: Data from the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014 (released June 10, 2014). See: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/?referrer=https://www.google.com/

Arendt, R. (2015). Gut microbiome transplantation, and use of probiotics and prebiotics as new treatment for both diabetes type 1 and 2. See: http://patientcircle.org/english/2015/4/3/gut-microbiome-transplantation-and-use-of-probiotics-and-pre.html

Barengolts, E. (2013). VITAMIN D AND PREBIOTICS MAY BENEFIT THE INTESTINAL MICROBACTERIA AND IMPROVE GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS IN PREDIABETES AND TYPE 2 DIABETES. Endocrine Practice,19:3,497-510. See: http://search.proquest.com/openview/cd67c546597d8fe8652f2b6671281eef/1?pq-origsite=gscholar

Barrett, M. (2014). Mike Barrett’s article, 3 Studies Proving Toxic Glyphosate Found in Urine, Blood, and Even Breast Milk. See: http://naturalsociety.com/3-studies-proving-toxic-glyphosate-found-urine-blood-even-breast-milk/#ixzz3kyT2fMKq

Ciubotaru, I. et al. (2015).  Significant differences in fecal microbiota are associated with various stages of glucose tolerance in African-American male veterans.  ENDO 2015; Abstract FRI-597. See: https://endo.confex.com/endo/2015endo/webprogram/Paper21179.html

Conger, K. (2011). Type-2 diabetes linked to autoimmune reaction in study. Stanford Medicine News Center. See: http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2011/04/type-2-diabetes-linked-to-autoimmune-reaction-in-study.html

Davenport, L. (2015). Do Antibiotics Raise Diabetes Risk via Gut Microbiota? Medscape Medical News. See: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/842409

Fraser, W. (9/6/2015). Personal communication.

Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah. (2015). Your Changing Microbiome. See: http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/microbiome/changing/

Gray, N. (2015). Gut microbiota shifts could predict diabetes risk, suggests study. See: http://www.nutraingredients.com/Research/Gut-microbiota-shifts-could-predict-diabetes-risk-suggests-study

Hardin, J.R. (2015). Whole Food Supplements (Bio-available) vs OTC (Synthetic) Vitamins. See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2015/01/25/whole-food-supplements-bio-available-vs-otc-synthetic-vitamins/

Hardin, J.R. (2014). ALZHEIMER’S AND VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY. See: http://allergiesandyourgut.com/2014/11/30/alzheimers-gut-bacteria-music/

Institute for Responsible Technology (2014).  GMO Dangers. See: http://www.responsibletechnology.org/gmo-dangers

Kostic, A.D. et al. (2015). The dynamics of the human infant gut microbiome in development and in progression toward type 1 diabetes. Cell Host & Microbe, 17:2, 260-273. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25662751

Kratka, P. (2011). Whole Grains: How do grains affect the human body? See: http://bonfirehealth.com/whole-grains-affect-human-body-omegas/

Mercola, R. (8/23/2015). Effortless Healing Guidelines for Friends and Family New to Natural Healing. See:  http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/08/23/effortless-healing-guidelines.aspx?e_cid=20150823Z1_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20150823Z1&et_cid=DM85321&et_rid=1085872322

Mercola, R. (8/27/2015). Free Vitamin D Continuing Education Courses Now Available, PLUS Key Nutritional Strategies to Optimize Your Health. See: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/08/27/key-nutritional-strategies.aspx?e_cid=20150827Z1_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20150827Z1&et_cid=DM85847&et_rid=1092851133

Mercola, R. (5/10/2015). The Real RDA for Vitamin D Is 10 Times Higher Than Currently Recommended. See: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/05/10/vitamin-d-recommended-dietary-allowance.aspx?e_cid=20150510Z1_SNL_B_art_1&utm_source=snl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20150510Z1_SNL_B&et_cid=DM76062&et_rid=946969954

Miller, D. (2011). Personal communication.

Moms Across America. (2014).  Glyphosate Testing Full Report: Findings in American Mothers’ Breast Milk, Urine and Water.  See: http://www.momsacrossamerica.com/glyphosate_testing_results

Moore, K. (2015). Diabetes prevention &/or treatment – Focus on the gut and nutrition? Role and benefits of biomarker discovery and validation. See: http://blog.medbiomarkers.com/diabetes-focus-on-the-gut-role-and-benefits-of-a-biomarker-consortium/

NON GMO Project. (2015). GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS. See: http://www.nongmoproject.org/about-gmos-2/

Norton, A. (2015). Change in Gut Bacteria May Precede Type 1 Diabetes in Kids:
Small study offers hope for a diagnostic test some day, researchers say. Healthy Day News. See: http://consumer.healthday.com/diabetes-information-10/misc-diabetes-news-181/change-in-gut-bacteria-may-precede-type-1-diabetes-in-kids-696231.html

Sanfilippo, D. (2015). Podcast Episode #178: The Autoimmune Solution with Dr. Amy Myers. See: http://balancedbites.com/2015/02/podcast-episode-178-autoimmune-solution-dr-amy-myers.html

WebMD. (2008). Diabetes Overview. See: http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/diabetes-overview

Wikipedia. (2015). Proteobacteria. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proteobacteria

 

 

 

© Copyright 2015 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 

 

 

Artificial Sweeteners in Us, Our Rivers, Lakes & Tap Water

 

 

(Source: www.andesproperty.com)
(Source: www.andesproperty.com)

 

Artificial sweeteners are used in over 6,000 processed foods and drinks sold around the world. Here’s a list of their chemical names along with their brand names from Dr Oz:

ACESULFAME POTASSIUM
ACK
Ace K
Equal Spoonful (also +aspartame)
Sweet One
Sunett

ASPARTAME
APM
AminoSweet (but not in US)
Aspartyl-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester
Canderel (not in US)
Equal Classic
NatraTaste Blue
NutraSweet

ASPARTAME-ACESULFAME SALT
TwinSweet (Europe only)

CYCLAMATE
Not in US as per FDA
Calcium cyclamate
Cologran = cyclamate and saccharin; not in US
Sucaryl

ERYTHRITOL
Sugar alcohol
Zerose
ZSweet

GLYCEROL
Glycerin
Glycerine

GLYCYRRHIZIN
Licorice

HYDROGENATED STARCH HYDROLYSATE (HSH)
Sugar alcohol

ISOMALT
Sugar alcohol
ClearCut Isomalt
Decomalt
DiabetiSweet (also contains Acesulfame-K)
Hydrogenated Isomaltulose
Isomaltitol

LACTITOL
Sugar alcohol

MALTITOL
Sugar alcohol
Maltitol Syrup
Maltitol Powder
Hydrogenated High Maltose Content Glucose Syrup
Hydrogenated Maltose
Lesys
MaltiSweet (hard to find online to buy)
SweetPearl

MANNITOL
Sugar alcohol

NEOTAME

POLYDEXTROSE
Sugar alcohol
(Derived from glucose and sorbitol)

SACCHARIN
Acid saccharin
Equal Saccharin
Necta Sweet
Sodium Saccharin
Sweet N Low
Sweet Twin

SORBITOL
Sugar alcohol
D-glucitol
D-glucitol syrup

SUCRALOSE
1′,4,6′-Trichlorogalactosucrose
Trichlorosucrose
Equal Sucralose
NatraTaste Gold
Splenda

TAGATOSE
Natrulose

XYLITOL
Sugar alcohol
Smart Sweet
Xylipure
Xylosweet

– Oz, 2014

Other brand names may have gone on the market since Dr Oz’s list was published, in March of 2014. For example, aspartame has been rebranded as a so-called “natural sweetener” named AminoSweet.

 

 

(Source: eat-spin-run-repeat.com)
(Source: eat-spin-run-repeat.com)

 

 

 

WHERE ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS GO AFTER THEY PASS THROUGH OUR BODIES

These chemical sugar substitutes are manufactured to register as sweetness in our mouths but then pass through the body without ever being broken down (except aspartame, which is therefore particularly poisonous). Ever wonder what happens to them after they get excreted from our bodies?
They work their way through the sewer systems to waste water treatment plants, which are also unable to break down these complex chemicals. So most artificial sweeteners pass out of water treatment plants in virtually the same form in which they were consumed. Scientists have found the presence of artificial sweeteners in water leaving treatment plants – and also in ground water, surface waters (rivers, lakes, and oceans around the world), and tap water. (Boxall, 2013), (HealthFreedoms, 2015), (Science Daily, 2009)

 

(Source: www.the-open-mind.com)
(Source: www.the-open-mind.com)

 

 

 

 

 

OUR GUT BACTERIA ON ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS

 

 

(Source: juliedaniluk.com)
(Source: juliedaniluk.com)

 

Before these artificial sweeteners reach water treatment plants, while they’re still working their way through our GI tracts, they’re also upsetting the critical equilibrium of the probiotic microbes living in our intestines, the ones that are the primary regulators of our immune functions and overall health.

 

(Source: hrexach.wordpress.com)
(Source: hrexach.wordpress.com)

 

Results from an Israeli study, published in Nature in 2014, found both mice and humans who consumed artificial sweeteners developed adverse alterations in their gut microbiomes along with glucose intolerance, changes  consistent with metabolic syndrome (a cluster of conditions — increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol levels — that occur together, increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes).
In the part of the study on human subjects, researchers asked people who didn’t usually consume artificial sweeteners to add them to their diet for seven days. It took only one week for these people to develop a poorer glycemic response. (Faherty, 2014) (Suez et al, 2014)

 

(Source: www.drperlmutter.com)
(Source: www.drperlmutter.com)

 

 

 

More bad news about artificial sweeteners: The changes they produce in the composition of your gut bacteria can actually make you gain weight! And here you thought you were using these sweeteners in your tea, eating diet processed foods, and drinking ‘lite’ soft drinks so you could keep your weight down.
“Our relationship with our own individual mix of gut bacteria is a huge factor in determining how the food we eat affects us,” says Eran Elinav, MD, of the Weizmann Institute of Science’s department of immunology. “Especially intriguing is the link between use of artificial sweeteners—through the bacteria in our guts—to a tendency to develop the very disorders they were designed to prevent; this calls for reassessment of today’s massive, unsupervised consumption of these substances.” (Merz, 2014)

 

(Source: ediblearia.com)
(Source: ediblearia.com)

 

 

 

WHAT DO YOU SUPPOSE THESE ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS IN OUR WATERS DO TO MARINE LIFE?

Some researchers have used some clever thinking to track the path of artificial sweeteners after they exit our bodies: measure their amounts in treated sewage sludge or, further down the line, in rivers, lakes, and drinking water taps.
Here are three examples:
In a 2013 Canadian study, researchers found artificial sweeteners in Ontario’s Grand River in amounts equivalent to about 81,000 – 190,000 cans of artificially sweetened soda flowing through its waters EACH DAY. (Spoelstra et al, 2013) The 300-kilometre river empties into Lake Erie. Lake Erie empties into Lake Ontario (via Niagara Falls), then into the Saint Lawrence Seaway and eventually into the Atlantic Ocean.

 

stlaw_britannicaMap

The study tested for the presence of only four artificial sweeteners: sucralose, cyclamate, saccharin and acesulfame. (You can check their brand names in Dr Oz’s list above.) It also found three types of sweetener coming out of the water faucets in Brantford, a town along the river. Brantford’s water supply comes from the Grand River before being treated at the town’s water treatment plant.

 Grand River, Brantford, Ontario

(Source: www.newcomerconnections.ca)
(Source: www.newcomerconnections.ca)
Amy Parente, a biochemistry professor at Mercyhurst University in Erie, PA, conducted her own study in Lake Erie looking for sucralose (used in Splenda).  Her team also found the sweetener in the water. Unlike the Canadian study which tested water coming out of waste water treatment plants, Parente’s group tested the water at Lake Erie beaches, after it had had a chance to dilute.
She and her team found 0.15 micrograms of the sweetener for every liter of water. This translates to up to 72 metric tons of sweetener in the waters of Lake Erie.
Since Parente’s results came out in 2012, she and her students have been looking at how sucralose affects a foraging snail living in Lake Erie’s waters.  They found the presence of sweetener fooled the animals into believing there was nutrition in the water, leaving them with fewer calories to grow healthily and reproduce. This could well be true for other foraging animals – and the impact would have a domino effect. (HealthFreedoms, 2015)

 

(Source: www.fondriest.com)
(Source: www.fondriest.com)

 

 

A third study, published in 2014 by Environmental Science and Technology (a publication of the American Chemical Society), found large amounts of sucralose, saccharin, aspartame and acesulfame in sludge collected from two waste water treatment plants around Albany, NY.
The authors suggest that artificial sweetener could harm plants’ ability to perform photosynthesis, leading to less food for animals dependent on plants, creating a ripple effect all the way along the food chain. (Subedi & Kannan, 2014)

 

Albany’s Waste Water Sludge – Contains Artificial Sweeteners

(Source: www.kval.com)
(Source: www.kval.com)

 

 

After reviewing all this research on artificial sweeteners’ adverse impact on our health and the environment, I’m hard pressed to think of any good use for them.

 

 

(Source: chriskresser.com)
(Source: chriskresser.com)

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES

Boxall, B. (2013). Artificial sweeteners found in river water and drinking supplies. Los Angeles Times. See: http://articles.latimes.com/2013/dec/16/science/la-sci-sn-artificial-sweeteners-river-20131216

Faherty, S. (2014). Artificial Sweeteners May Have Despicable Impacts on Gut Microbes. Scientific American Blog Network. See: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/artificial-sweeteners-may-have-despicable-impacts-on-gut-microbes/

HealthFreedoms. (2015). Rivers, Lakes Loaded With Artificial Sweeteners, Researchers Say. See: http://www.healthfreedoms.org/rivers-lakes-loaded-with-artificial-sweeteners-researchers-say/

Merz, J. (2014). This Is How Diet Soda Can Make You Gain Weight: New research suggests that gut bacteria are the missing link between artificial sweeteners and metabolic diseases. See: http://www.prevention.com/health/diabetes/artificial-sweeteners-diet-soda-affect-gut-bacteria-and-weight-gain

Oz, A. (2014). List of Names for Artificial Sweeteners. See: http://www.doctoroz.com/article/list-names-artificial-sweeteners

Science Daily. (2009). Artificial Sweeteners May Contaminate Water Downstream Of Sewage Treatment Plants And Even Drinking Water. See: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090617123650.htm

Spoelstra, J. et al. (2013). Artificial Sweeteners in a Large Canadian River Reflect Human Consumption in the Watershed. PLOS/One. See: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0082706

 

Subedi, B. & Kannan, K. (2014).  Fate of Artificial Sweeteners in Wastewater Treatment Plants in New York State, U.S.A. .Environmental Science & Technology, 48: 23, 13668–13674. See: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es504769c?journalCode=esthag

Suez, J. et at. (2014).  Nature. See: http://www.nature.com/articles/nature13793.epdf?referrer_access_token=M3W5imyZocwck7AtS_ZkptRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0NBdpwZGPexYAm1DpqpwgjJUhIQbCRjxAfnCKUaE10rKwdaN8xuCY_L26IiuLYKSmQZHB89AfA7O-biEJw3UMaoCTBsrO4Pdj2LE4sJCtx1nYKdvP4M7EvCAz6aAWoF6wLT0j0TBntKsLNSLC7skSJd6fXWwaTeR-0lvrzk37cfCMrTC87ASBQuaaLTts1_RlPV_ijHqS21EdmufuzVLasA00go1hms82SRy4_q5xV1hg%3D%3D&tracking_referrer=blogs.scientificamerican.com

 

 

 

© Copyright 2015 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

THE SACRED SCIENCE – a natural medicine quest into the Amazon rainforest

 

 

 

(Source: www.thesacredscience.com)
(Source: www.thesacredscience.com)

 

 

If you’re fascinated by ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin’s work with the shamans in the Amazon Rain Forest to learn about and preserve their age old indigenous cures, you’ll also be interested in this award-winning documentary, THE SACRED SCIENCE.

In this 2011 documentary, eight people afflicted with serious illnesses (Parkinson’s, breast cancer, Crohn’s disease, diabetes, depression, prostate cancer, a rare neuro-endocrine cancer,  alcohol addiction) leave everything behind for 30 days and embark on a natural medicine quest into the heart of the Amazon jungle.  Working with indigenous healers, each participant uses a combination of time-tested plant medicines and intense spiritual ceremonies to restore their health.

Five of them will return with real results, two will return disappointed, and one won’t come back at all.

In THE SACRED SCIENCE, Nicholas J. Polizzi and his team take their brave group of patients straight to the source of this ancient plant wisdom.

Here’s the film’s trailer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZS9AVcLsYnk

Click below to watch the whole film online at NO COST. The offer runs until October 23rd.
http://www.thesacredscience.com/screening1/
(Source: www.documentarytube.com)
(Source: www.documentarytube.com)

 

If you don’t know them already, I also highly recommend ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin’s 1993 book TALES OF A SHAMAN’S APPRENTICE: An ethnobotanist searches for new medicines in the Amazon Rain Forest.

 

imgres

and the 2001 award winning film about his work, THE SHAMAN’S APPRENTICE.

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Plotkin has become an expert on rainforest ecosystems. He is an advocate for tropical rainforest conservation, working in partnership with indigenous people and The Amazon Conservation Team to protect the Amazon, its people and plants.

 

 

REFERENCES

Miranda Productions.(2001). The Shaman’s Apprentice. Documentary film. See: http://www.amazon.com/Shamans-Apprentice-Plotkin-Susan-Sarandon/dp/B00DYQW4V0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1413741806&sr=8-1&keywords=mark+plotkin+film

Plotkin, M.J. (1993). Tales of a Shaman’s Apprentice: An ethnobotanist searches for new medicines in the Amazon Rain Forest.  See: http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Shamans-Apprentice-Ethnobotanist-Medicines/dp/014012991X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1413741740&sr=8-1&keywords=mark+plotkin

Polizzi, N. J. (2011). The Sacred Science. Documentary film.  See: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1956671/

The Amazon Conservation Team. See: http://www.amazonteam.org/

 

 

© Copyright 2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.