Tag Archives: Gluten Sensitivity

Amy Myers on What To Do If You’ve Gotten Glutened

Updated 6/10/2015.

 

 

1940s-gluten-image1

 

I can’t count the times I’ve been assured something is gluten free only to discover 20 minutes later that it wasn’t. This post is for those of  us who have celiac disease, gluten intolerance, or gluten allergy … practical advice from Functional Medicine doc Amy Myers on what to do if you’ve accidentally consumed some gluten. These are Dr Myers’ recommendations for what to do when you realize you’ve been zapped:

 

 

 

(Source: AmyMyersMD.com)
(Source: AmyMyersMD.com)

 

If you are gluten sensitive or have celiac disease you know all too well about accidentally ingesting gluten — otherwise known as getting “glutened.”

The outward manifestation of getting glutened may be different for everyone, and can cause a variety of symptoms such as brain fog, diarrhea, constipation, headache, rash, weakness, joint pain, swelling, vomiting, and fatigue. However, inside your gut the effects are essentially the same; gluten is wreaking havoc. Gluten causes inflammation and damage to the intestines. Ridding yourself of this inflammatory protein, reducing inflammation and healing your gut from the damage are essential to recovering as quickly as possible.

 

3 Steps To Recover After Getting Glutened

1. The more quickly you can get the gluten out of your system, the better you’ll feel.

These three things will help you do that promptly and effectively:

Digestive Enzymes. Digestive enzymes help speed up the breakdown and absorption of macronutrients. Be sure to take an enzyme that includes dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV), which helps break down gluten specifically. In fact, I recommend that those with celiac and gluten intolerance take enzymes with DPP-IV when dining out.

Binding agents. Activated charcoal and bentonite clay bind toxins and help reduce gas and bloating. It’s best to increase water intake when taking either of these to avoid constipation, which will only delay healing.

Hydration. Fluids will help flush your system and keep you hydrated if you’re vomiting or have diarrhea. In addition to regular water, you can try coconut water, which contains electrolytes that may have been lost through vomiting or diarrhea.

 

2. Decrease inflammation.

Inflammation occurs naturally in our body when there has been an insult or injury to it. Decreasing this inflammation is essential to healing your gut. These three things will help you reduce inflammation quickly:

Omega-3 fatty acids. Fish oils, flax and chia seeds are full of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. I recommend 1-2 grams of omega-3 oils daily. You can go up to 4 grams a day for a week after accidental gluten ingestion.

Ginger has high levels of gingerol, which gives it a natural spicy flavor and acts as an anti-inflammatory in the body. It also has potent anti-nausea properties and can ease stomach cramping. I like to drink warm ginger tea as a comforting, anti-inflammatory beverage.

Turmeric is a member of the ginger family that contains the active ingredient curcumin, which is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. My anti-inflammatory smoothie with turmeric is a great drink to help you quickly recover from getting glutened.

 

3. Heal your gut.

Nearly 70% of our immune system is in our gut. Having a healthy gut is crucial for optimal health. The six things below will help you heal your gut.

Probiotics. Routinely, I recommend taking a highly concentrated probiotic (25-100 billion units) a day. I advise my patients to “double-up” on their probiotic dose for a week after a gluten exposure.

L-Glutamine. Glutamine is an amino acid that is great for repairing damage to the gut, helping the gut lining to regrow and repair, undoing the damage caused by gluten. I recommend 3-5 grams a day for a week after exposure.

Slippery elm. Slippery elm contains mucilage, which stimulates nerve endings in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to increase its secretion of mucus. Mucus forms a barrier in the gut to protect it and promote healing.

Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL). DGL is an herb that’s been used for more than 3,000 years in the treatment of digestive issues, including ulcers and indigestion. DGL also supports the body’s natural processes for maintaining the mucosal lining of the GI tract.

Marshmallow root is a multipurpose supplement that can be used for respiratory or digestive relief. Like slippery elm, it contains mucilage, which eases the inflammation in the stomach lining, heals ulcers, and treats both diarrhea and constipation by creating a protective lining on the digestive tract.

Bone broth is very high in the anti-inflammatory amino acids glycine and proline. The gelatin in bone broth protects and heals the mucosal lining of the digestive tract that may get disrupted by being glutened.

Once you realize that you have been glutened, implement this three-step approach as soon as possible. If you are not seeing any improvement in your symptoms after three days or you’re getting worse. I would advise you to follow up with your physician.

 

 

droz_stillshot1-600x335

 

 

See Dr Myers’ entire article here.
To learn more about Dr Myers and peruse her useful website go to http://www.amymyersmd.com/ .

 

 

REFERENCES

Myers, A. (2014). 3 Steps to Recover After Getting Glutened. See: http://www.amymyersmd.com/2013/08/3-steps-to-recover-after-getting-glutened/

 

 

© Copyright 2015 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 

 

 

Celiac Disease, Gluten Sensitivity, & Gluten Allergy

Last updated 6/2/2015.

(Source: offthegrain.com)
(Source: offthegrain.com)
Gluten is a protein found in many grains and seeds, principally wheat, rye, barley, spelt, kamut, and triticale. It is the composite of the storage proteins gliadin and a glutenin conjoined with starch in the endosperm of various grass-related grains. (Wikipedia, 5/29/2015)
Although gluten-containing foods are an important part of the modern diet,  many humans have difficulty digesting gluten. The effects of this trouble can be immediately apparent in some people while in others, deleterious reactions to gluten make themselves known only over time.
As many as 20 million Americans may be sensitive to gluten. Another 3 million  have celiac disease and 400,000 – 600,000 are allergic to wheat. (Woodward, 2011)
That’s a lot of people!

 

 

(Source: myglutenfreequest.com)
(Source: myglutenfreequest.com)

 

 

 

 

 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF GLUTEN IN THE HUMAN DIET (Guthrie, 2010)

The consumption of grains is relatively new to our diet, dating from  when we stopped being nomadic hunter-gatherers, settled down and started growing crops and domesticating animals,  15,000 years ago at the earliest. Before that time, our ancestors mostly ate the meat of animals they hunted, along with wild fruits, plants, tubers, nuts, and seeds they foraged. The planting of dietary grains as crops originated in Mesopotamia.
Some of us have adapted well to our largely grain-filled diets. Many of us have not. For example, about 30% of northern Europeans carry genes for gluten problems.
Furthermore, the wheat we eat today is also considerably changed. In today’s modern version of wheat, up to 90% of its protein content now consists of gluten – 10 times what it was even 100 years ago.

 

 

Einkorn (ancient wheat) vs Modern Wheat

(Source: www.einkorn.com)
(Source: www.einkorn.com)

 

In people with celiac disease, ingesting gluten causes the body to attack the small intestine. For the 30-40% of people who have a non-celiac gluten intolerance, the immune system mistakes gluten for a foreign body (a pathogenic bacteria or virus) and mobilizes an arsenal of antibodies to attack the ‘invader’. For me, even the small amount of gluten on French fries cooked in oil shared by a flour-containing food (eg, something breaded) is enough to set off a full blown gluten reaction.
On average, an American consumes about 150 pounds of wheat each year. We get it in the processed foods we rely on, breads, baked goods, pasta. There’s also gluten in many commercially produced seasonings and most bacon. Wheat flour is used widely as a breading and thickening agent. I recently learned the hard way that even some nutritional supplements contain gluten.
Think about what you ate today. Did you have toast, a muffin, a bagel,  pancakes, cereal, oatmeal (usually processed in factories that also process wheat) for breakfast? A sandwich, pizza, a Big Mac, soup thickened with flour, soy sauce (it’s brewed with wheat) for lunch? Cookies, pretzels or a doughnut as a snack? A beer (brewed with wheat) after work? Pasta and some cake for dinner?
That’s gluten in every meal you ate!
Here’s a list of foods containing gluten. It’s a good start but by no means complete. Gluten can also be a hidden ingredient in some very unexpected places –  your lipstick, cosmetics, hair products, toothpastes, marinades, sauces, pretty much all processed foods, textured vegetable protein, seitan, imitation crab stick, MSG, ketchup, candies, communion wafers, some pharmaceuticals and nutritional supplements, Play Doh … and many, many more.
(Source: jenniferskitchen.com)
(Source: jenniferskitchen.com)


 

 

(Source: glutenfreedietwithnutrition.com)
(Source: glutenfreedietwithnutrition.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

CELIAC DISEASE (Fasano et al, 2003)

 

(Source: bostoniano.info)
(Source: bostoniano.info)

 

Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine triggered in genetically susceptible people by the ingestion of gluten. Specifically, CD is a reaction to the gliadin, a protein which is the soluble part of gluten, found in wheat and several other cereals in the grass genus Triticum.
See this University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center site for a list of the approximately 300 symptoms and conditions potentially due to celiac disease. You’ll see why trying to diagnose celiac disease from symptoms alone can be quite confusing.
The long term health effects of undiagnosed CD can be quite serious.

 

Biopsy of the mucosal lining of a healthy small intestine: long villi providing a large area for digestion and absorption of nutrients

(Source: library.med.utah.edu)
(Source: library.med.utah.edu)

 

 

Biopsy of a small intestine with celiac disease: blunted villi, crypt hyperplasia, and lymphocyte infiltration of crypts

Coeliac_path

 

Although common in Europe, until 2003, celiac disease was thought to be rare in the United States.
Research led by world-renowned expert on celiac disease, Alessio Fasano, MD, corrected that assumption. Dr Fasano is Chief, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Professor of Pediatric Gastroenterology and the W. Allan Walker Chair of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.

 

Alessio Fasano, MD
Alessio Fasano, MD

 

Fasano conducted the largest rigorous study ever performed to establish the prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the US.
13,145 subjects from 32 states participated in this study: 3,236 symptomatic patients (with either GI symptoms or a disorder associated with CD), 4,508 1st degree and 1,275 2nd degree relatives of patients with biopsy-proven CD,  and 4,126 not-at-risk individuals. The age distribution of the study’s subjects, infants to 65 and older, corresponded with the age distribution of the population as reported in the US Census of 2000.
Subjects defined as ‘at-risk’ were relatives of patients with CD or patients who presented with CD-associated symptoms (diarrhea, abdominal pain, and constipation) or with CD-associated disorders (type 1 diabetes mellitus, Down syndrome, anemia, arthritis, osteoporosis, infertility, and short stature).
The results suggested that celiac disease:

“… occurs frequently not only in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms, but also in first- and second-degree relatives and patients with numerous common disorders even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. The prevalence of CD in symptomatic patients and not-at-risk subjects was similar to that reported in Europe. Celiac disease appears to be a more common but neglected disorder than has generally been recognized in the United States….

“The prevalence of CD was as high in first- and second-degree relatives without symptoms as in relatives with symptoms, highlighting the importance of genetic predisposition as a risk factor for CD….

” If CD is as common in the United States as our study suggests, one must question why it is not diagnosed more frequently. Foremost among the possible explanations is that if physicians believe that CD is rare, they are less likely to test for it. A failure by physicians to appreciate that many individuals with the disease initially present without gastrointestinal symptoms is another reason why CD testing may not be performed….

“The prevalence of CD in symptomatic patients and not-at-risk subjects was similar to that reported in Europe. Given the high morbidity and mortality related to untreated CD and the prolonged delay in diagnosis in the United States,  serologic testing of at-risk patients (ie, case finding) is important to alleviate unnecessary suffering, prevent complications, and improve the quality of life of a multitude of individuals with CD.”

 

Prevalence of Celiac Disease Worldwide

(Source:  World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Nov 14; 18:42, 6036–6059)
(Source:
World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Nov 14; 18:42, 6036–6059)

 

The number of people clinically diagnosed with celiac disease has been rising dramatically around the world and is now considered a major public health issue. In 2010, diagnosed celiac was four times more common than it had been 60 years ago, affecting about one in 100 people. (Mayo Clinic, 2010)
The ratio of clinically diagnosed to undiagnosed cases of CD (people who have celiac reactions to gluten, often without the usual GI symptoms) is now believed to be 1:3 to 1:5. (Catassi et al, 2014)
 

 

 

 

 

GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (AKA GLUTEN INTOLERANCE) (Woodward, 2011)

 

(Source: friedeggsandtoast.com)
(Source: friedeggsandtoast.com)

 

In 2011, Alicia Woodward, the editor of Living Without,  interviewed Dr Fasano about his research that showed gluten sensitivity is real and a medical condition distinct from celiac disease. When she asked him about the import of having demonstrated the existence of gluten sensitivity, Dr Fasano replied:

“In my humble opinion, it’s a big deal. First, we’ve moved gluten sensitivity, also called gluten intolerance, from a nebulous condition to a distinct entity—and one that’s very distinct from celiac disease. Gluten sensitivity affects 6 to 7 times more people than celiac disease so the impact is tremendous. Second, we now understand that reactions to gluten are on a spectrum. The immune system responds to gluten in different ways depending on who you are and your genetic disposition. Third, there’s a lot of confusion in terms of gluten reactions. Gluten and autism, gluten and schizophrenia—is there a link or not? These debates are on their way to being settled. And fourth and most important, for the first time we can advise those people who test negative for celiac disease but insist they’re having a bad reaction to gluten that there may be something there, that they’re not making it up, that they’re not hypochondriacs. Once it’s established that a patient has a bad reaction to gluten, it’s important to determine which part of the spectrum he or she is on before engaging in treatment, which is the gluten-free diet.”

 

(Source: www.pharmaceutical-journal.com)
(Source: www.pharmaceutical-journal.com)

 

Given that celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and gluten allergy share many clinical symptoms, Woodward wondered if people can move along the spectrum to a more serious version of difficulty with gluten:

“No, I don’t think so. The three main conditions—celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, wheat allergy—are based on very different mechanisms in the immune system. Given that fact, it’s hard to imagine the possibility that you could jump from one to the other.”

Fasano had this to say about why so many humans are having such negative reactions to gluten after generations of wheat consumption:

“Although we’ve been eating wheat for thousands of years, we are not engineered to digest gluten. We are able to completely digest every protein we put in our mouths with the exception of one—and that’s gluten. Gluten is a weird protein. We don’t have the enzymes to dismantle it completely, leaving undigested peptides that can be harmful. The immune system may perceive them as an enemy and mount an immune response.”

Fasano offered an explanation for why we’re now seeing such an explosion of gluten-related health problems:

“Two components are coming together to create this perfect storm. First, the grains we’re eating have changed dramatically. In our great-grandparents era, wheat contained very low amounts of gluten and it was harvested once a year. Now we’ve engineered our grains to substantially increase yields and contain characteristics, like more elasticity, that we like. We’re susceptible to the consequences of these extremely rich, gluten-containing grains. Second, and this applies to the prevalence of celiac disease that’s increased 4-fold in the last 40 years, is the upward trend we’re seeing in all autoimmune diseases. We’re changing our environment faster than our bodies can adapt to it.”

Woodward mentioned that she’d heard him say gluten sensitivity is where celiac disease was 30 years ago:

“It’s déjà vu. The patients, as usual, were visionary, telling us this stuff existed but healthcare professionals were skeptical. The confusion surrounding gluten sensitivity—testing, biomarkers—is exactly the same confusion we had around celiac disease 30 years ago. So we’re starting all over again now.”

Symptoms of Gluten Sensitivity:

Most patients with gluten sensitivity reported 2 or more symptoms (Fasano et al, 2011)

(Source: justinhealth.com)
(Source: justinhealth.com)
See Q & A with Alessio Fasano, MD: The latest on gluten sensitivity and celiac disease for the entire interview.

 

See Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity to read about Fasano et al’s study comparing celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. It’s a long scientific article but you can skip down to the short Conclusions section if you wish.
The researchers concluded that CD and GS are “distinct clinical entities caused by different intestinal mucosal responses to gluten.” “CD results from a complex, and as yet undetermined, interplay of increased intestinal permeability, mucosal damage, environmental factors in addition to gluten, and genetic predisposition”  while “GS is associated with prevalent activation of an innate immune response.” (Sapone et al, 2011)

 

 

 

 

GLUTEN AND WHEAT ALLERGY (Mayo Clinic, 2015) (UCLA, 2015)

(Source: www.hailmerry.com)
(Source: www.hailmerry.com)

A gluten allergy is a specific, reproducible immune response to ingesting foods containing wheat or other sources of gluten – or, in some cases, even from inhaling gluten-containing flour. Wheat (along with peanuts, tree nuts, milk, soy, egg, fish, and shellfish)  is one of the most common of the eight major recognized food allergens, responsible for 90% of all IgE (immunoglobulin E) – mediated food allergies.
In people with an IgE-mediated allergy to the gliadin found in gluten, exposure causes the release of antibodies to try to neutralize the gliadin. More rarely, the immune response to gluten may result from other specialized immune pathways (non-IgE mediated).
A wheat allergy typically presents as a food allergy but can also be a contact allergy (say from occupational exposure to wheat). Like all allergies, wheat allergy involves IgE and mast cell response.
“Typically the allergy is limited to the seed storage proteins of wheat, some reactions are restricted to wheat proteins, while others can react across many varieties of seeds and other plant tissues. Wheat allergy may be a misnomer since there are many allergenic components in wheat, for example serine protease inhibitors, glutelins and prolamins and different responses are often attributed to different proteins. Twenty-seven potential wheat allergens have been successfully identified.” (Wikipedia, 2/18/2015)

 

How the body reacts to an allergen

(Source: www.moondragon.org)
(Source: www.moondragon.org)

 

 

Symptoms of a gluten allergy  develop within a few hours, often a few minutes after exposure, and include:
  • Swelling, itching or irritation of the mouth or throat
  • Hives, itchy rash or swelling of the skin
  • Nasal congestion
  • Headache
  • Itchy, watery eyes
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Cramps, nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Some people allergic to gluten may also experience anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include:
  • Swelling or tightness of the throat
  • Chest pain or tightness
  • Severe difficulty breathing
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Pale, blue skin color
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Fast heartbeat

 

 

Comparison of Gluten-Related Disorders

Source: (UCLA Celiac Disease Program)
Source: (UCLA Celiac Disease Program)

 

 

 

TESTING FOR GLUTEN PROBLEMS

While researching this post, I encountered conflicting information on the best ways to test for celiac disease and gluten allergy – and, in the case of gluten sensitivity, whether there even IS a test (see Update below). If you’re interested in getting tested, you may find this article by Integrative Medicine pioneer J.E. Williams, OMD, helpful: Learn the best tests for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
Update:  In 2013 Dr Fasano reported he was confident that a clinical trial being conducted by his Center for Celiac Research, in collaboration with Second University of Naples, would identify a biomarker for non-celiac gluten sensitivity and that the discovery of such a biomarker would lead to the development of diagnostic tests for the condition. Patients were being enrolled for the clinical trial in January 2013. (Anderson, 2014). As far as I can tell, the results haven’t been published yet.

 

 

intestines_quote

 

 

Many thanks to Frank Lipman, MD, for pointing me to Alessio Fasano’s work on celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and gluten allergy.

 

 

 

REFERENCES

Anderson, J. (2014). Dr. Fasano: Gluten Sensitivity Biomarker Likely Coming. See: http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/glutenintolerance/fl/Dr-Fasano-Gluten-Sensitivity-Biomarker-Likely-Coming-Soon.htm

Catassi, C. et al. (2014). The New Epidemiology of Celiac Disease. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, 59, S7-9.  See: http://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltext/2014/07001/The_New_Epidemiology_of_Celiac_Disease.5.aspx

Fasano, A. et al. (2003). Prevalence of Celiac Disease in At-Risk and Not-At-Risk Groups in the United States: A Large Multicenter Study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 163:3, 286-292. See: http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleID=215079

Guthrie, C. (2010). GLUTEN: THE WHOLE STORY. See: https://experiencelife.com/article/gluten-the-whole-story/

Mayo Clinic. (2010). CELIAC DISEASE: ON THE RISE. See: http://www.mayo.edu/research/discoverys-edge/celiac-disease-rise

Mayo Clinic. (2015). Wheat allergy. See: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/wheat-allergy/basics/definition/con-20031834

Misty. (2009). List of Foods Containing Gluten. See: http://www.whatcontainsgluten.com/2009/04/list-of-foods-containing-gluten.html

Sapone, A. et al. (2011). Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. BioMed Central Medicine, 9:23. See: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/9/23

UCLA Division of Digestive Diseases. (2015). Celiac vs Gluten-Sensitivity vs Wheat Allergies. See: http://gastro.ucla.edu/site.cfm?id=281

University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center. (undated). Symptoms and conditions potentially due to celiac disease. See: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/CDCFactSheets10_SymptomList.pdf

Wikipedia. (5/29/2015). Gluten. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten

Wikipedia. (2/18/2015). Wheat Allergy. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_allergy

Williams, J.E. (2015). LEARN THE BEST TESTS FOR CELIAC DISEASE AND NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY. See: http://renegadehealth.com/blog/2015/04/24/learn-the-best-tests-for-celiac-disease-and-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity

Woodward, Al. (2011). Q & A with Alessio Fasano, MD: The latest on gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. See: http://www.glutenfreeandmore.com/issues/4_15/qa_augsep11-2554-1.html

 

© Copyright 2015 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

THE RISE OF GLUTEN INTOLERANCE IN JAPAN

 

japan-face-masks

During my recent trip to Japan, I noticed many people of all ages wearing surgical masks to screen out spring pollens and lower their chances of catching airborne viruses – and wondered if the heavy consumption of gluten in wheat and wheat-based products in the Japanese diet has been a significant factor in weakening people’s immune systems, making them more sensitive to pollens and contagious illnesses.
Japanese politeness and consideration of other people are traits foreigners are struck by when we visit there. This concern for others even extends to wearing a face mask to protect other people from catching one’s germs. Until 2003, the typical mask was cotton with a pouch the user could line with gauze. The gauze was discarded at the end of the day and the mask was washed between uses. These masks were worn only when people were ill and couldn’t take off from work or school.
In 2003 a Japanese medical supply company called Unicharm released a new kind of mask designed specifically for hay fever sufferers.  The Unicharm mask is made of a non-woven material, is completely disposable, cheap to buy in bulk and more effective in blocking out pollens.
Sales of Unicharm masks more than tripled since their introduction in 2003. In 2009, Japanese fear that an H1N1 (swine flu) outbreak would spread there from elsewhere in Asia, worries about micro-particulate matter after earthquakes and the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident in 2011 all produced large spikes in sales.
And now that the wearing of surgical masks is a common sight in Japan, young people have started wearing them for another reason: To make it less likely that people will try talking to them in public. (Baseel, 2014)

 

images-3

So back to the question of gluten intolerance among the Japanese: The answer seems to be yes, it’s on the rise.
A 2013 article presenting results from a Japanese study published in the Journal of Gastoenterology concludes: “Despite the increased incidence of IBD and high positivity for serum celiac antibody in Japanese IBD patients, no true-positive celiac disease was noted, suggesting the presence of gluten intolerance in these populations.” (Watanabe, 2013)

 

HOW WHEAT BECAME POPULAR IN JAPAN
An article called Waves of Grain: How did Japan come to prefer wheat over rise?  by Nadia Arumugam relates the history of how wheat has become such a prominent part of the modern Japanese diet. I found it a fascinating and worthwhile read –  a page turner in fact.
In the early 1900’s the Japanese consumed small quantities of wheat in udon noodle dishes and in Western-style cafes serving pastries and cakes.
Japanese civilians began consuming a bit more wheat out of necessity during the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945). And during World War II in the Pacific, rice crops went to feed Japanese troops while Japanese civilians resorted to eating even more wheat in the form of breads, dumplings and udon noodles just to fill their stomachs.

 

imgres-1

The postwar period in Japan saw the population on the edge of mass starvation. American emergency aid delivered large amounts of wheat flour and lard.  Breads became popular along with cheap, stomach-filling Chinese-style foods made from wheat.

 

imgres

In the mid-1950’s, the U.S. signed a series of deals with Japan to provide surplus American wheat to the Japanese. In return, we loaned money to the Japanese weapons industry. That was followed by greatly intensified American efforts to get the Japanese to trade their rice for bread. American scientists told Japanese citizens that not only was a rice-based diet nutritionally incomplete, but that it actually led to brain damage!
Then the coup de grace in the wheat-for-rice conversion was a school lunch program the U.S. initiated during our post-war occupation of Japan from 1945-1952. We provided their school children a daily lunch that included bread made from America’s surplus wheat, powdered milk and a meat-based stew. (Arumugam, 2013)
And now you see all sorts of mostly insipid-looking wheat breads, cookies and snacks for sale all over Japan.

 

melon-pan

 

 

AND MODERN WHEAT IS EVEN WORSE

 

images-2

Modern wheat is now being made even more problematic for human and animal consumption by a Monsanto-produced wheat seed that has been genetically modified to be glyphosate-resistant (often called Roundup Ready – ie, a seed that has been genetically engineered to be resistant to Monsanto’s popular herbicide, Roundup) – like their widely used genetically modified corn, soybean, canola, cotton, sugar beet and alfalfa seeds. Even organic wheat fields have become contaminated with Monsanto’s genetically modified  seeds that have spread from other farmers’ fields. Japan is very concerned about the health dangers posed by genetically modified wheat so has taken the step of canceling its contract with American wheat farmers to avoid this additional threat to its population. (Connealy, 2013)

 

images-1

Read more about the dangers posed by GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS

glyphosate

 

REFERENCES

Arumgam, N. (2012). Waves of Grain: How did Japan come to prefer wheat over rise?. Slate.com. See http://www.slate.com/articles/life/food/2012/04/wheat_in_japan_how_the_nation_learned_to_love_the_american_grain_instead_of_rice_.html

Baseel, C. (2014). Why do Japanese people wear surgical masks. It’s not always for health reasons. JapanToday.com. See http://japantoday.com/category/lifestyle/view/why-do-japanese-people-wear-surgical-masks-its-not-always-for-health-reasons

Connealy, L. E. (2013). Why the rise in gluten allergies & celiac. HumanEventsHealth.com. See http://www.humanevents.com/2013/06/10/why-the-rise-in-gluten-allergies-celiac/

Watanabe, C., et al. (2013). Prevalence of serum celiac antibody in patients with IBD in Japan. Journal of Gastroenterology. Published online June 2013. See http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00535-013-0838-6#page-1

 

 

© Copyright 2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.