Tag Archives: Osteopororis

How Sugar Affects Your Health – 146 Ways

 

 

(Source: glutenfabulous.org)
(Source: glutenfabulous.org)

 

This list of 146 way sugar affects our health – all detrimental – was compiled by Nancy Appleton, PhD from medical journals and other scientific publications. Dr Appleton is a clinical nutritionist and researcher. She is the author of several books, including Lick The Sugar Habit, Stopping Inflammation: Relieving the Cause of Degenerative Diseases, and Suicide by Sugar: A Startling Look at Our #1 National Addiction. Her website is www.nancyappleton.com

 

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.

2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.

3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.

4. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.

5. Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).

6. Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity and function you loose.

7. Sugar reduces high density lipoproteins.

8. Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.

9 Sugar leads to cancer of the ovaries.

10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.

11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.

12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.

13. Sugar can weaken eyesight.

14. Sugar raises the level of a neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.

15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.

16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.

17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.

18. Sugar malabsorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.

19. Sugar can cause premature aging.

20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.

21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.

22. Sugar contributes to obesity

23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

25. Sugar can cause arthritis.

26. Sugar can cause asthma.

27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).

28. Sugar can cause gallstones.

29. Sugar can cause heart disease.

30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.

31. Sugar can cause multiple sclerosis.

32. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.

33. Sugar can cause varicose veins.

34. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.

35. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.

36. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.

37. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.

38. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.

39. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E (alpha-Tocopherol in the blood.

40. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.

41. Sugar can increase cholesterol.

42. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.

43. Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.

44. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs)(Sugar bound non-enzymatically to protein)

45. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.

46. Sugar causes food allergies.

47. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.

48. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.

49. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.

50. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.

51. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA

52. Sugar can change the structure of protein.

53. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.

54. Sugar can cause cataracts.

55. Sugar can cause emphysema.

56. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.

57. Sugar can promote an elevation of low density lipoproteins (LDL).

58. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.

59. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.

60. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson’s disease.

61. Sugar can cause a permanent altering the way the proteins act in the body.

62. Sugar can increase the size of the liver by making the liver cells divide.

63. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.

64. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.

65. Sugar can damage the pancreas.

66. Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.

67. Sugar is enemy #1 of the bowel movement.

68. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).

69. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.

70. Sugar can make the tendons more brittle.

71. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.

72. Sugar plays a role in pancreatic cancer in women.

73. Sugar can adversely affect school children’s grades and cause learning disorders..

74. Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha, and theta brain waves.

75. Sugar can cause depression.

76. Sugar increases the risk of gastric cancer.

77. Sugar and cause dyspepsia (indigestion).

78. Sugar can increase your risk of getting gout.

79. Sugar can increase the levels of glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test over the ingestion of complex carbohydrates.

80. Sugar can increase the insulin responses in humans consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.

81 High refined sugar diet reduces learning capacity.

82. Sugar can cause less effective functioning of two blood proteins, albumin, and lipoproteins, which may reduce the body’s ability to handle fat and cholesterol.

83. Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.

84. Sugar can cause platelet adhesiveness.

85. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance; some hormones become underactive and others become overactive.

86. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.

87. Sugar can lead to the hypothalamus to become highly sensitive to a large variety of stimuli.

88. Sugar can lead to dizziness.

89. Diets high in sugar can cause free radicals and oxidative stress.

90. High sucrose diets of subjects with peripheral vascular disease significantly increases platelet adhesion.

91. High sugar diet can lead to biliary tract cancer.

92. Sugar feeds cancer.

93. High sugar consumption of pregnant adolescents is associated with a twofold increased risk for delivering a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant.

94. High sugar consumption can lead to substantial decrease in gestation duration among adolescents.

95. Sugar slows food’s travel time through the gastrointestinal tract.

96. Sugar increases the concentration of bile acids in stools and bacterial enzymes in the colon. This can modify bile to produce cancer-causing compounds and colon cancer.

97. Sugar increases estradiol (the most potent form of naturally occurring estrogen) in men.

98. Sugar combines and destroys phosphatase, an enzyme, which makes the process of digestion more difficult.

99. Sugar can be a risk factor of gallbladder cancer.

100. Sugar is an addictive substance.

101. Sugar can be intoxicating, similar to alcohol.

102. Sugar can exacerbate PMS.

103. Sugar given to premature babies can affect the amount of carbon dioxide they produce.

104. Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.

105. The body changes sugar into 2 to 5 times more fat in the bloodstream than it does starch.

106. The rapid absorption of sugar promotes excessive food intake in obese subjects.

107. Sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

108. Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.

109. Sugar can slow down the ability of the adrenal glands to function.

110. Sugar has the potential of inducing abnormal metabolic processes in a normal healthy individual and to promote chronic degenerative diseases.

111.. IVs (intravenous feedings) of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.

112. High sucrose intake could be an important risk factor in lung cancer.

113. Sugar increases the risk of polio.

114. High sugar intake can cause epileptic seizures.

115. Sugar causes high blood pressure in obese people.

116. In Intensive Care Units, limiting sugar saves lives.

117. Sugar may induce cell death.

118. Sugar can increase the amount of food that you eat.

119. In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44% drop in antisocial behavior.

120. Sugar can lead to prostate cancer.

121. Sugar dehydrates newborns.

122. Sugar increases the estradiol in young men.

123. Sugar can cause low birth weight babies.

124. Greater consumption of refined sugar is associated with a worse outcome of schizophrenia

125. Sugar can raise homocysteine levels in the blood stream.

126. Sweet food items increase the risk of breast cancer.

127. Sugar is a risk factor in cancer of the small intestine.

128. Sugar may cause laryngeal cancer.

129. Sugar induces salt and water retention.

130. Sugar may contribute to mild memory loss.

131. As sugar increases in the diet of 10 years olds, there is a linear decrease in the intake of many essential nutrients.

132. Sugar can increase the total amount of food consumed.

133. Exposing a newborn to sugar results in a heightened preference for sucrose relative to water at 6 months and 2 years of age.

134. Sugar causes constipation.

135. Sugar causes varicose veins.

136. Sugar can cause brain decay in prediabetic and diabetic women.

137. Sugar can increase the risk of stomach cancer.

138. Sugar can cause metabolic syndrome.

139. Sugar ingestion by pregnant women increases neural tube defects in embryos.

140. Sugar can be a factor in asthma.

141. The higher the sugar consumption the more chances of getting irritable bowel syndrome.

142. Sugar could affect central reward systems.

143. Sugar can cause cancer of the rectum.

144. Sugar can cause endometrial cancer.

145. Sugar can cause renal (kidney) cell carcinoma.

146. Sugar can cause liver tumors.

 

 

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Many thanks to Dr Beth Forgosh, of Discover Chiropractic of Soho, for bringing Dr Appleton’s list to my attention.

 

 

Note added to this post on 12/29/2014:

 

fruit-vs-dessert

 

Suzette Lawrence, MSN, commented that Dr Appleton’s list, above, describes the effects of REFINED sugars:

“This is not the case for natural fruits sugars that are attached to the fiber in the fruit, known as levulose … if absorbed it occurs low in the intestines and is converted to glycogen in the liver and stored there as an emergency energy source.  I agree that the SAD (Standard American Diet) beginning in infancy sets the stage for every disease, and some new ones. Think, GMO beet sugar … ”

From a 2014 article by the Cancer Treatment Centers of America entitled Natural vs. refined sugars – What’s the difference?:

Sugar, in all forms, is a simple carbohydrate that the body converts into glucose and uses for energy. But the effect on the body and your overall health depends on the type of sugar you’re eating, either natural or refined.

We wanted to explore the difference between these sugar types as a follow-up to our post about whether sugar drives the growth of cancer, which has received several comments. We again turned to Julie Baker, Clinical Oncology Dietitian at our hospital outside Atlanta, for her expertise on the issue.

Understanding sugars

Natural sugars are found in fruit as fructose and in dairy products, such as milk and cheese, as lactose. Foods with natural sugar have an important role in the diet of cancer patients and anyone trying to prevent cancer because they provide essential nutrients that keep the body healthy and help prevent disease.

Refined sugar comes from sugar cane or sugar beets, which are processed to extract the sugar. It is typically found as sucrose, which is the combination of glucose and fructose. We use white and brown sugars to sweeten cakes and cookies, coffee, cereal and even fruit. Food manufacturers add chemically produced sugar, typically high-fructose corn syrup, to foods and beverages, including crackers, flavored yogurt, tomato sauce and salad dressing. Low-fat foods are the worst offenders, as manufacturers use sugar to add flavor.

Most of the processed foods we eat add calories and sugar with little nutritional value. In contrast, fruit and unsweetened milk have vitamins and minerals. Milk also has protein and fruit has fiber, both of which keep you feeling full longer.

DR APPLETON’S REFERENCES

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Bernstein, J., et al. Depression of Lymphocyte Transformation Following Oral Glucose Ingestion. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.1997;30:613.
2. Couzy, F., et al. Nutritional Implications of the Interaction Minerals, Progressive Food and Nutrition Science 17;1933:65-87.
3. Goldman, J., et al. Behavioral Effects of Sucrose on Preschool Children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 1986;14(4):565-577.
4. Scanto, S. and Yudkin, J. The Effect of Dietary Sucrose on Blood Lipids, Serum Insulin, Platelet Adhesiveness and Body Weight in Human Volunteers, Postgraduate Medicine Journal. 1969;45:602-607.
5. Ringsdorf, W., Cheraskin, E. & Ramsay R. Sucrose,Neutrophilic Phagocytosis and Resistance to Disease, Dental Survey. 1976;52(12):46-48.
6. Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., & Brownlee, M. Glucose and Aging. Scientific American. May 1987:90.
Lee, A. T. & Cerami, A. The Role of Glycation in Aging. Annals of the New York Academy of Science. 663:63-67.
7. Albrink, M. & Ullrich I. H. Interaction of Dietary Sucrose and Fiber on Serum Lipids in Healthy Young Men Fed High Carbohydrate Diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:419-428.
Pamplona, R., et al. Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis. Medical Hypotheses. Mar 1993;40(3):174-81.
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16. Ibid.
17. Jones, T. W., et al. Enhanced Adrenomedullary Response and Increased Susceptibility to Neuroglygopenia: Mechanisms Underlying the Adverse Effect of Sugar Ingestion in Children. Journal of Pediatrics. Feb 1995;126:171-7.
18. Ibid.
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20. Abrahamson, E. & Peget, A. Body, Mind and Sugar. (New York:Avon,1977.}
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24. Yudkin, J. Sweet and Dangerous. (New York;Bantam Books:1974), 129.
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27. Crook, W. J. The Yeast Connection. (TN:Professional Books, 1984)..
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29. Yudkin, J. Sugar Consumption and Myocardial Infarction. Lancet.Feb 6, 1971;1(7693):296-297.
Reiser, S. Effects of Dietary Sugars on Metabolic Risk Factors Associated with Heart Disease. Nutritional Health. 1985;203-216.
30. Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease. (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1974).
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32. Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease. (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1974.)
33. Cleave, T. & Campbell, G. Diabetes, Coronary Thrombosis and the Saccharine Disease. (Bristol, England, John Wrightand Sons, 1960).
34. Behall, K. Influence of Estrogen Content of Oral Contraceptives and Consumption of Sucrose on Blood Parameters. Disease Abstracts International. 1982;431-437.
35. Glinsmann, W., Irausquin, H., & K. Youngmee. Evaluation of Health Aspects of Sugar Contained in Carbohydrate Sweeteners. F. D. A. Report of Sugars Task Force. 1986;39:36_38.
36. Tjderhane, L. & Larmas, M. A High Sucrose Diet Decreases the Mechanical Strength of Bones in Growing Rats. Journal of Nutrition. 1998:128:1807-1810.
37. Appleton, N. Healthy Bones. New York: Avery Penguin Putnam,1989.
38. Beck_Nielsen H., Pedersen O., & Schwartz S. Effects of Diet on the Cellular Insulin Binding and the Insulin Sensitivity in Young Healthy Subjects. Diabetes. 1978;15:289-296 .
39. Mohanty P. et al. Glucose Challenge Stimulates Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generation by Leucocytes. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Aug 2000; 85(8):2970-2973.
40. Gardner, L. & Reiser, S. Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate on Fasting Levels of Human Growth Hormone and Cortisol. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. 1982;169:36-40.
41. Reiser, S. Effects of Dietary Sugars on Metabolic Risk Factors Associated with Heart Disease. Nutritional Health. 1985;203:216.
42. Preuss, H. G. Sugar-Induced Blood Pressure Elevations Over the Lifespan of Three Substrains of Wistar Rats. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 1998;17(1) 36-37.
43. Behar, D., et al. Sugar Challenge Testing with Children Considered Behaviorally Sugar Reactive. Nutritional Behavior. 1984;1:277-288.
44. Furth, A. & Harding, J. Why Sugar Is Bad For You. New Scientist. Sep 23, 1989;44.
45. Lee AT, & Cerami A. Role of Glycation in Aging. Annals of the New York Academy of Science. Nov 21,1992 ;663:63-70.
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47. Sucrose Induces Diabetes in Cats. Federal Protocol. 1974;6(97).
48. Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease (New Canaan Ct: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1974).131.
49. Ibid. 132.
50. Vaccaro O., Ruth, K. J. & Stamler J. Relationship of Postload Plasma Glucose to Mortality with 19 Year Follow-up. Diabetes Care. Oct 15,1992;10:328-334.
Tominaga, M., et al, Impaired Glucose Tolerance Is a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease, but Not Fasting Glucose. Diabetes Care. 1999:2(6):920-924.
51. Lee, A. T. & Cerami, A. Modifications of Proteins and Nucleic Acids by Reducing Sugars: Possible Role in Aging. Handbook of the Biology of Aging. (New York: Academic Press, 1990.).
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53. Dyer, D. G., et al. “=Accumulation of Maillard Reaction Products in Skin Collagen in Diabetes and Aging. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1993:93(6):421-422.
54. Veromann, S.et al. Dietary Sugar and Salt Represent Real Risk Factors for Cataract Development. Ophthalmologica. Jul-Aug 2003 ;217(4):302-307.
55. Monnier, V. M. Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process. Journal of Gerontology. 1990:45(4):105-110.
56. Schmidt A.M. et al. Activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products: a mechanism for chronic vascular dysfunction in diabetic vasculopathy and atherosclerosis. Circular Research Archives. 1999 Mar 19;84(5):489-97.
57. Lewis, G. F. and Steiner, G. Acute Effects of Insulin in the Control of VLDL Production in Humans. Implications for Theinsulin-resistant State. Diabetes Care. 1996 Apr;19(4):390-3
R. Pamplona, M. .J., et al. Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis. Medical Hypotheses. 1990;40:174-181.
58. Ceriello, A. Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation. Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
59. Appleton, Nancy. Lick the Sugar Habit. (New York:Avery Penguin Putnam, 1988).
60. Hellenbrand, W. Diet and Parkinson’s Disease. A Possible Role for the Past Intake of Specific Nutrients. Results from a Self-administered Food-frequency Questionnaire in a Case-control Study. Neurology. Sep 1996;47(3):644-650 Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., & Brownlee, M. Glucose and Aging. Scientific American. May 1987: 90.
62. Goulart, F. S. Are You Sugar Smart? American Fitness. Mar-Apr 1991: 34-38.
63. Ibid.
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65. Goulart, F. S. Are You Sugar Smart? American Fitness. March_April 1991: 34-38
66. Ibid.
67. Ibid.
68. Ibid.
69. Ibid.
70. Nash, J. Health Contenders. Essence. Jan 1992-23: 79_81.
71. Grand, E. Food Allergies and Migraine. Lancet. 1979:1:955_959.
72. Michaud, D. Dietary Sugar, Glycemic Load, and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in a Prospective Study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Sep 4, 2002 ;94(17):1293-300.
73. Schauss, A. Diet, Crime and Delinquency. (Berkley Ca; Parker House, 1981).
74. Christensen, L. The Role of Caffeine and Sugar in Depression. Nutrition Report. Mar 1991;9(3):17-24.
75. Ibid.
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77. Yudkin, J. Sweet and Dangerous.(New York:Bantam Books,1974) 129.
78. Ibid, 44
79. Reiser, S., et al. Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986:43;151-159.
80. Reiser,S., et al. Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans.  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:151-159.
81. Molteni, R, et al. A High-fat, Refined Sugar Diet Reduces Hippocampal Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor, Neuronal Plasticity, and Learning. NeuroScience. 2002;112(4):803-814.
82. Monnier, V., Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process. Journal of Gerontology. 1990;45:105-111.
83. Frey, J. Is There Sugar in the Alzheimers Disease? Annales De Biologie Clinique. 2001; 59 (3):253-257.
84. Yudkin, J. Metabolic Changes Induced by Sugar in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease and Diabetes. Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):5-8.
85. Ibid.
86. Blacklock, N. J., Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone. Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):9-12.
Curhan, G., et al. Beverage Use and Risk for Kidney Stones in Women. Annals of Internal Medicine. 1998:28:534-340.
87. Journal of Advanced Medicine. 1994;7(1):51-58.
88. Ibid.
89. Ceriello, A. Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation. Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.
90. Postgraduate Medicine. Sept 1969:45:602-07.
91. Moerman, C. J., et al. Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Biliary Tract Cancer. International Journal of Epidemiology. Ap 1993;2(2):207-214.
92. Quillin, Patrick, Cancer’s Sweet Tooth. Nutrition Science News. Apr 2000.
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93. Lenders, C. M. Gestational Age and Infant Size at Birth Are Associated with Dietary Intake among Pregnant Adolescents. Journal of Nutrition. Jun 1997;1113-1117.
94. Ibid.
95. Bostick, R. M., et al. Sugar, Meat and Fat Intake and Non-dietary Risk Factors for Colon Cancer Incidence in Iowa Women. Cancer Causes & Control. 1994:5:38-53.
96. Ibid.
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97. Yudkin, J. & Eisa, O. Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988:32(2):53-55.
98. Lee, A. T. & Cerami A. The Role of Glycation in Aging. Annals of the New York Academy of Science. 1992; 663:63-70.
99. Moerman, C. et al. Dietary Sugar Intake in the Etiology of Gallbladder Tract Cancer. International Journal of Epidemiology. Apr 1993; 22(2):207-214.
100. Sugar, White Flour Withdrawal Produces Chemical Response. The Addiction Letter. Jul 1992:4.
Colantuoni, C., et al. Evidence That Intermittent, Excessive Sugar Intake Causes Endogenous Opioid Dependence. Obesity Research. Jun 2002 ;10(6):478-488.
101. Ibid.
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104. Christensen L. et al. Impact of A Dietary Change on Emotional Distress. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 1985;94(4):565-79.
105. Nutrition Health Review. Fall 85. Sugar Changes into Fat Faster than Fat.
106. Ludwig, D. S., et al. High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating and Obesity. Pediatrics. Mar 1999;103(3):26-32.
107. Girardi, N.L. Blunted Catecholamine Responses after Glucose Ingestion in Children with Attention Deficit Disorder. Pediatrics Research. 1995;38:539-542.
Berdonces, J. L. Attention Deficit and Infantile Hyperactivity. Rev Enferm. Jan 2001;4(1)11-4
108. Blacklock, N. J. Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone. Nutrition Health. 1987;5(1 & 2):9-17.
109. Lechin, F., et al. Effects of an Oral Glucose Load on Plasma Neurotransmitters in Humans. Neurophychobiology. 1992;26(1-2):4-11.
110. Fields, M. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Aug 1998;17(4):317-321.
111. Arieff, A. I. Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco. San Jose Mercury. June 12/86. IVs of Sugar Water Can Cut Off Oxygen to the Brain.
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113. Sandler, Benjamin P. Diet Prevents Polio. Milwakuee, WI,:The Lee Foundation for for Nutritional Research, 1951.
114. Murphy, Patricia. The Role of Sugar in Epileptic Seizures. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients. May, 2001.
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120. Deneo-Pellegrini H,. et al. Foods, Nutrients and Prostate cancer: a Case-control study in Uruguay. Br J Cancer. 1999 May;80(3-4):591-7.
121. Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition. Diabetes. 1999 Apr;48(4):791-800.
122. Yudkin, J. and Eisa, O. Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988;32(2):53-5.
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Analysis. British Journal of Psychiatry. 2004;184:404-408.
125. Fonseca, V. et al. Effects of a High-fat-sucrose Diet on Enzymes in Homosysteine Metabolism in the Rat. Metabolism. 200; 49:736-41.
126. Potischman, N, et.al. Increased Risk of Early-stage Breast Cancer Related to Consumption of Sweet Foods among Women Less than Age 45 in the United States. Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Dec;13(10):937-46.
127.Negri. E. et al. Risk Factors for Adenocarcinoma of the Small Intestine.
International Journal of Cancer. 1999:82:I2:171-174.
128.Bosetti, C. et al. Food Groups and Laryngeal Cancer Risk: A Case-control Study from Italy and Switzerland. International Journal of Cancer, 2002:100(3): 355-358.
129. Shannon, M. An Empathetic Look at Overweight.CCL Family Foundation. Nov-Dec.1993. 20(3):3-5.
130. Harry G. Preuss, MD, of Georgetown University Medical School.
131. Health After 50. Johns Hopkins Medical Letter. May, 1994.
132. Allen, S. Sugars and Fats: The Neurobiology of Preference. Journal of Nutrition. 2003;133:831S-834S.
133. Booth, D.A.M. et al. Sweetness and Food Selection: Measurement of Sweeteners Effects on Acceptance. Sweetness. Dobbing, J., Ed., (London:Springer-Verlag, 1987).
134. Cleve, T.L On the Causation of Varicose Veins. Bristol, England, John Wright, 1960.
135. Cleve, T.L On the Causation of Varicose Veins. Bristol, England, John Wright, 1960.
136. Ket, Yaffe et al. Diabetes, Impaired Fasting Glucose and Development of Cognitive Impairment in Older Women. Neurology. 2004;63:658�663.
137. Chatenoud, Liliane et al. Refined-cereal Intake and Risk of Selected Cancers in Italy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Dec 1999;70:1107-1110.
138. Yoo, Sunmi et al. Comparison of Dietary Intakes Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in Young Adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  2004 Oct;80(4):841-848.
139. Shaw, Gary M. et al. Neural Tube Defects Associated with Maternal Periconceptional Dietary Intake of Simple Sugars and Glycemic Index.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Nov 2003;78:972-978.
140. Krilanovich, Nicholas J. Fructose Misuse, the Obesity Epidemic, the Special Problems of the Child, and a Call to Action  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Nov 2004;80:1446-1447.
141.Jarnerot, G., Consumption of Refined Sugar by Patients with Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, or Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. 1983 Nov;18(8):999-1002.
142. Allen, S. Sugars and Fats: The Neurobiology of Preference. Journal of Nutrition.
2003;133:831S-834S.
143. De Stefani E, Mendilaharsu M, & Deneo-Pellegrini H. Sucrose as a Risk Factor for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum: a Case-control Study in Uruguay. International Journal of Cancer. 1998 Jan 5;75(1):40-4.
144. Levi F, Franceschi S, Negri E, & La Vecchia C. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer. Cancer. 1993 Jun 1;71(11):3575-3581.
145. Mellemgaard A. et al. Dietary Risk Factors for Renal Cell Carcinoma in Denmark. European Journal of Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82.
146. Rogers AE, Nields HM, & Newberne PM. Nutritional and Dietary Influences on Liver Tumorigenesis in Mice and Rats. Arch Toxicol Suppl. 1987;10:231-43. Review.

 

 

© Copyright 2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

The Healing Properties of Unrefined Salts

Updated 8/4/2014 & 5/21/2016.

 

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“There is a real misunderstanding about salt. On one hand, our consumption of salt seems to be killing us. On the other hand, we cannot live without salt. So, in order to answer this loaded question we must first explore the differences between table salt and unrefined salt.”

– Radiant Health Strategies (2010)

 

 

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Harvesting Sea Salt in France
Harvesting Sea Salt in France

 

 

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THE HISTORY OF SALT (Freeman, 2014) (Salt Works, 2014) (Kurlansky, 2002)

 

Humans used salt for various purposes long before written history began. The Peng-Tzao-Kan-Mu, the earliest known treatise on pharmacology, was published in China about 4,700 years ago. A large portion of it was devoted to a discussion of the medicinal uses for more than 40 kinds of salt.
As far back as 6,050 BC, ancient Egyptians used salt in religious offerings. It was a valuable trade commodity between the Phoenicians and the lands of their Mediterranean empire. Nomads travelling westward from China were known to carry salt. Egyptian art from 1,450 B.C. recorded the making of salt. Ancient Greek slave traders bartered salt for slaves – giving rise to the expression that someone was not worth his salt.
Salt influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires and inspired revolutions. Its rarity made it so valuable it was used as currency.
Revered as a precious mineral, salt was once traded ounce per ounce for gold.
Homer called salt a divine substance. Plato described it as especially near to the gods.
The English word salary derived from sal, the word for salt: Roman soldiers were paid in salt rations.
The word salad also originated from sal:  Early Romans salted their leafy greens and vegetables.
Among other English words derived from sal are sauce and sausage.
And salt has been a symbol of fertility over the ages – it’s the root of the word salacious.

 

 

Salt crystals growing on the walls of a tunnel at the Salina Turda Salt Mine in Romania. Salt has been produced and trades in Eastern Europe since Medieval times.
Salt crystals growing on the walls of a tunnel at the Salina Turda Salt Mine in the town of Turda, Transylvania, Romania, now turned into a museum.  This mine dates from the 17th century. The plentiful salt deposit was a decisive factor in the development of the prosperous town of Turda in ancient Roman times.

 

 

Lake Deep Inside the Salina Turda Salt Mine Museum
Lake Deep Inside the Salina Turda Salt Mine Museum in Romania

 

 

Salt taxes and monopolies led to wars and protests in many parts of the world. The Chinese government, like many others over time, made salt taxes a major revenue source. Anger over the salt tax was one of the causes of the French Revolution.
In 2,200 BC, the Chinese emperor Hsia Yu levied one of the first known taxes – on salt. In 13th century Tibet, Marco Polo observed that tiny cakes of salt were pressed with images of the Grand Khan and used as coins. Salt is still used as currency among the nomads of Ethiopia’s Danakil Plains.
In colonial India during the Raj, only the British government was permitted to make and profit from the salt production conducted by Indian workers living on the coast. In March 1930, Gandhi protested the British monopoly and marched to the coast  with his followers. Arriving there, he violated the law by boiling a chunk of salty mud. This Salt March to Dandi, or the Salt Satyagraha, encouraged people across India to begin making their own salt in protest, and the march became an important milestone in the struggle for Indian independence from British rule.
Salt also played a prominent role in the European exploration of North America and on subsequent American, Canadian, and Mexican history.  The first Native Americans “discovered” by Europeans in the Caribbean were harvesting sea salt.
In the American colonies under British rule, salt production also played a significant role. The first patent to produce salt in the colonies was held by the  Massachusetts Bay Colony, which continued to produce it for the next 200 years. The Erie Canal was opened primarily to facilitate salt transportation.
Salt has also had a significant military history. In 1777, the British Army’s Lord Howe rejoiced when he succeeded in capturing General Washington’s salt supply. Thousands of Napoleon’s troops died during his army’s retreat from Moscow because their wounds would not heal as a result of a lack of salt. And during the American in 1812 Civil War, the Union Army captured significant Confederate salt works, creating a serious salt shortage in the southern states.

 

Himalayan Salt Mine in Khewra, Pakistan
Himalayan Salt Mine in Khewra, Pakistan

 

 

If your interest in the history of salt has been piqued, see History of Salt for more information.
I also highly recommend a New York Times bestseller by Mark Kurlansky called  Salt: A World History. He’s an intelligent, lively writer and his books are a pleasure to read – page turners really. Another of his books, The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell, also a national bestseller, kept me engrossed during a week’s vacation a few years ago.
Salt: A World History is populated with odd ball characters such as frozen-food pioneer Clarence Birdseye and New York City’s sturgeon king, Barney Greengrass.  Its contents have intriguing titles like “A Discourse on Salt, Cadavers and Pungent Sauces”, “The Hapsburg Pickle”, and “Two Ports and the Prosciutto in Between”.
Kurlansky is a winner of the James Beard Award for Excellence in Food Writing for Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World.

 

 

Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT’S WRONG WITH PROCESSED TABLE SALT (Bauman, 2012), (Ener-Chi Wellness Center, 2013), (Kresser, 2012), (Radiant Health Strategies, 2010)

 

 

 

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Salt, like water, is an essential part of the human body.
Throughout history, salt was indeed divine – full of trace minerals, unlike the processed table salt generally in use today.
Table salt is mined from the earth with bulldozers and other machinery and then heavily refined. To make this salt resistant to the re-absorption of moisture, increasing its shelf-life and making it more convenient for consumers to use in salt shakers, processors add desiccants (anti-caking agents).
It’s soaked in a solution which may contain sulfuric acid or chlorine and various  bleaches. Then it’s heated to a temperature that removes all the minerals and other trace elements that our bodies need to function. Some processed salts are then spray coated with  iodine.

 

Morton Salt girl
Morton Salt girl
Processed table salt is quite different from natural, unrefined salts. It no longer has the ability to combine with our body fluids, so undermines necessary, basic chemical and metabolic processes. Water retention, kidney and blood pressure problems, gall stones, and many other serious health problems can result from refined salt consumption.

 

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Unrefined salts contain trace minerals that support the proper functioning of all our bodily systems, including the immune system, glandular system and nervous system. These trace minerals have been processed out of refined table salt.

 

 

 

 

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Refined salt is cheap. It’s added to almost all manufactured foods and most food eaten in or purchased from restaurant chains and other restaurants.
On average, Americans consume more than 3,400 mg of refined salt per day. Of this amount, about 75% is derived from processed food. The other 25% comes from sources such as water treatment and medications.
Processed salt is a significant ingredient in most processed foods and restaurant meals – many meals contain far more than a day’s worth of sodium.

 

 

American Daily Salt Intake (Source: Nutrition & You
American Daily Salt Intake (Source: Nutrition & You

 

 

Salt has increasingly been blamed for a number of  health problems, such as high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.
Most of what we’re told about salt these days is that its consumption needs to be reduced. It is even referred to as “the single most harmful substance in the food supply”. (Center for Science in the Public Interest, 2014)
When salt is chemically cleaned and processed, the trace minerals and electrolytes that naturally occur in unrefined salt are removed as if they were impurities.
Chemically processed table salt is inorganic, which means that the chemical bonds are so strong they can’t easily be broken down or metabolized by our bodies. When you take in an inorganic mineral, your body will either store it or eliminate it. In this case, when you take in table salt your body sees it as a poison and tries to get rid of it as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, most of us take in way more table salt than our bodies can eliminate. When this happens, the body has to do something with the excess salt.
Consuming a lot of chemically processed table salt makes us feel thirsty. That’s because the body has been put into a tough position. It can’t get rid of the table salt fast enough so it must neutralize it. To do that it takes water from healthy cells to surround this salt. As a result, you retain water and kill off healthy cells.

 

 

 

table-salt-himalayan-salt-health-nutrition

 

Our blood must always be slightly alkaline. For optimal health, 25% of our food intake must digest as acidic and 75% of our food intake must digest as alkaline. We are talking about the process that occurs after food leaves the  stomach.
A lemon tastes acidic but has an alkalizing effect on the blood. Meat doesn’t taste acidic but has a very acidic effect on the blood. If the food we eat is overly acidic, it cannot leave the body without being neutralized. Unfortunately, the typical American diet is highly acidic. When we eat a meal that is overly acidic, the body must neutralize the acid and regulate the alkalinity of the blood – which it accomplishes by taking organic sodium from its alkaline reserves.
Our bones regulate the level of calcium in the blood. If your body does not have enough alkaline reserves to neutralize excess acid, your bones come to your rescue. The bones contain a healthy supply of organic calcium. Because the body’s concern is with what it need in the present, not what it will need in the future, it takes calcium from your bones to neutralize the acid. If you keep feeding your body processed salt, it will be forced to rob your bones of calcium for years and years – and you will develop porous bones: osteoporosis.
The best source of organic sodium is fruits and vegetables. The average adult needs to eat about 10 pounds or so of fruits and vegetables a week.
Unrefined sea salt requires no effort from the body to digest and neutralize acids. And unrefined salt is so potent, that you only need a very small amount of it. It will not cause edema or make you thirsty when used properly. It’s a good back up to fruits and vegetables.
Symptoms such as digestive issues/constipation, low energy/fatigue, too much or dried mucous (congestion), and, over time, osteoporosis and other issues can result from a lack of good, usable organic sodium.

 

 

We need alkaline food source to neutralize the excessive acidic waste in the body. Refined salt won't be able to do this because it is acidic. Sea salt is alkaline so is able to neutralize the acidity and promote the uptake of oxygen in the blood. (Source: Allan Chai - http://bamboo-salt-benefits.blogspot.com/)
We need alkaline foods to neutralize the excessive acidic waste in the body. Refined salt won’t be able to do this because it is acidic. Sea salt is alkaline so is able to neutralize the acidity and promote the uptake of oxygen in the blood.
(Source: Allan Chai – http://bamboo-salt-benefits.blogspot.com/)

 

 

Processed table salt provides virtually NO benefits for the body and causes numerous health problems.
Refined, adulterated salt (a byproduct of the chemical industry) contains only two elements: sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl).
Most statistics on salt intake lump refined table salt with unrefined, unprocessed sea salt – leading salt to be seen as harmful.
The ONLY salts the body is able to digest, assimilate, and utilize properly are unrefined, unprocessed sea salt or rock salt. For salt to be useful to the body, it needs to penetrate foods – that is, dissolve in the moisture of our food. If salt is used in its dry state, it enters the body in a non-ionized form and creates thirst – a sign of being poisoned. It then causes further harm because it cannot be  assimilated and utilized properly.
Only around 7% of the processed salt that is manufactured goes for food. The other 93% is used by industry, which requires chemically pure sodium chloride for the manufacture of explosives, chlorine gas, baking soda, fertilizers and plastics. (Thomas, 2009)

 

 

ANOTHER PROBLEM WITH PROCESSED TABLE SALT: ADDED IODINE
The addition of iodine to table salt is a real problem, turning the salt our bodies need daily into little more than a poison.
We get iodine from eating fish and shellfish, eggs, cereal grains, legumes, dairy products from cows fed with iodized salt, and some food additives. There’s also iodine hidden in cough expectorants; antiseptics; drugs such as sulphonamide, lithium, dopamine, steroids, aspirin,  certain heart and anti-diabetic drugs; and natural supplements such as kelp and seaweed.
Iodized salt adds greatly to our iodine intake. As a result, people in the West risk iodine overload. As much as 75% of the body’s iodine is stored in the thyroid glad and used to produce hormones regulating metabolism. Too much iodine causes the levels of these hormones to become dangerously unbalanced, leading to metabolic and immune disorders.(Thomas, 2009)

 

 

 

A team of scientists from Yale University in the U.S and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, in Germany looked at the relationship between junk foods & the enormous increase in autoimmune diseases. 'This study is the first to indicate that excess refined and processed salt may be one of the environmental factors driving the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases,' they said. Junk foods at fast food restaurants as well as processed foods at grocery retailers represent the largest sources of sodium intake from refined salts.
A team of scientists from Yale University in the U.S and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, in Germany looked at the relationship between junk foods & the enormous increase in autoimmune diseases.
‘This study is the first to indicate that excess refined and processed salt may be one of the environmental factors driving the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases,’ they said.
Junk foods at fast food restaurants as well as processed foods at grocery retailers represent the largest sources of sodium intake from refined salts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW UNREFINED SEA SALT IS GOOD FOR YOU (Bauman, 2012), (Ener-Chi Wellness Center, 2013), (Kresser, 2012), (Natural Health International, 2014),(Radiant Health Strategies, 2010)

 

 

 

 

Health-Benefits-of-Sea-Salt.

 

 

  • The human body consists primarily of two elements … water and salt.
  • Water and salt when combined with light can build proteins.
  • Our blood is a 1% sole (water and salt) solution – the same concentration as ocean water.

 

Making sole: Add one one teaspoon of unrefined sea salt to a glass of artesian or spring water and drink before eating or drinking anything.
Making sole:
Add one one teaspoon of unrefined sea salt to a glass of artesian or spring water and drink before eating or drinking anything.
  • Salt has a crystalline structure that is electric not molecular (think about the word “electrolytes”).
  • Salt can neutralize acids in our bodies and it can also cancel out harmful electromagnetic vibrations in our environment.
  • It is water and salt that regulates all metabolic functions of the body, including functions of the solid matter itself.
  • Without water and salt, the solid matter of our body is absolutely useless. It is water and salt that energizes and activates our bodies.
  • Without potassium (which is stripped from processed table salt) and sodium, we could not think or act.

 

 

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  • Cells suffering from a dietary deficiency of trace elements lose their ability to control their ions – causing dire consequences on the human body. Cells begin to burst even if ion equilibrium is lost for a single minute. This can lead to nervous disorders, brain damage, or muscle spasms, as well as a breakdown of the cell-regenerating process.
  • Ingesting natural sea salt (reconstituted seawater) allows liquids to freely cross body membranes, blood vessels walls, and glomeruli (filter units) of the kidneys. When the natural salt concentration rises in the blood, the salt will readily combine with the fluids in the neighboring tissues. This, in turn, will allow the cells to derive more nourishment from the enriched intracellular fluid.
  • In addition, healthy kidneys are easily able to remove these natural saline fluids, which is essential for keeping the fluid concentration in the body balanced.
  • Refined salt, in contrast, may pose a great risk to the body by preventing this free crossing of liquids and minerals thereby causing fluids to accumulate and stagnate in the joints, lymphatic ducts, lymph nodes, and kidneys.

 

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  • The dehydrating effect of commercial salt can lead to gallstone formation, weight increase, high blood pressure, and other serious health problems.
  • The body requires salt to digest carbohydrates properly. Natural salt, saliva and gastric secretions combine to break down the fibrous parts of carbohydrate foods. In its dissolved and ionized form, salt facilitates the digestive process and sanitizes the GI tract.
  • The Celts, who lived throughout Europe about 1,200 BC to 61 AD, used unrefined sea salt to treat major physical and mental disturbances, severe burns, and other ailments.
  • Research has shown that sea water removes hydro-electrolytic imbalance, a disorder that causes a loss of the immune response, allergies, and numerous other health problems.
  • In recent years, salt has received a bad reputation and people have learned to fear it – in the same mistaken way they fear cholesterol and sunlight. Many doctors warn their patients to avoid sodium and sodium-rich foods. However, to live a salt-free life means suffering from an increased risk of mineral and trace mineral deficiencies, as well as from numerous related complications.
  • While it is true that consuming processed table sale is likely to have serious health consequences, eating unrefined salt fulfills the body’s need for salt without upsetting the hydro-electrolytic balance.

 

 

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  • If your diet contains an adequate amount of potassium in natural form, there’s no cause for concern about being harmed by the relatively small amount of sodium in real sea salt.
  • Foods that are  high in potassium are bananas, apricots, avocados, pumpkin seeds, beans, potatoes, winter squash, and many other vegetables.
  • However, if potassium levels in the body drop below normal, sodium (even in natural salt) can become a source of imbalance.
  • Dissolving a pinch of sea salt in a small amount of water and adding that to fruit or other foods that are usually eaten raw will aid in their digestion while also helping to de-acidify the body.
  • Adding a pinch of sea salt to drinking water generates desirable alkaline properties and provides you with important minerals and trace elements.
  • The drastic reduction of sodium can be just as harmful as consuming large amounts of it. Too little can cause spasms, irregular heart rhythms, sudden death and even increase the risk of heart attack in hypertensive patients.
  • Understanding the role sodium plays in the body, and the difference between “good” and “bad” sources of sodium, will help you get the bad salt out of your diet while still satisfying your body’s need for a source of high quality sodium.

 

 

Two Salts That Are Good for You vs Processed Salt
Two Salts That Are Good for You vs Processed Salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXAMPLES OF UNREFINED NATURAL SEA SALTS

 

 

 

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HIMALAYAN PINK SEA SALT (Underground Health, 2013)

 

 

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Himalayan pink salt is considered the best and most nutritious of all the sea salts – it’s also my personal favorite. It’s pretty and has a light, clean taste.
Himalayan Pink Salt was formed from marine fossil deposits over 250 million years ago, during the Jurassic Era.
Himalayan sea salt’s high mineral and iron content causes its crystals to range in color from sheer white, varying shades of pink, to deep reds. It contains over 84 minerals and trace elements – such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper and iron. This salt is recognized for its beautiful pink color, high mineral content, and its therapeutic properties.
It is used to stimulate circulation, relax the body, lower blood pressure, soothe sore muscles, and remove toxins from the body. Himalayan Salt can be used for cooking, in bath salt recipes, body scrubs, aromatherapy, and handmade soaps.
Regular consumption of Himalayan Pink Salt provides essential minerals and other trace elements, balances electrolytes, supports proper nutrient absorption, eliminates toxins, balances the body’s pH, normalizes blood pressure, and increases circulation and conductivity. It’s helpful for arthritis, skin rashes, psoriasis, herpes, and flue and fever symptoms.

 

 

Himalayan Pink Sea Salt
Himalayan Pink Sea Salt

 

 

Natural Pink Himalayan Sea Salt:
  • Stabilizes irregular heartbeats
  • Regulates your blood pressure, in conjunction with water
  • Extracts excess acidity from your body’s cells, particularly the brain cells
  • Balances the sugar levels in the blood
  • Generates hydroelectric energy in your body’s cells
  • Increases conductivity in nerve cells for communication and information processing
  • Enhances absorption of nutrients through the intestinal tract
  • Clears mucous plugs and sticky phlegm in the lungs, particularly in asthma and cystic fibrosis
  • Clears up congestion of the sinuses
  • Provides your body with a strong natural antihistamine
  • Regulates sleep: It is a natural hypnotic
  • Eliminates persistent dry coughs. Put a dash on the tongue
  • Prevents gout and gouty arthritis
  • Helps maintain sexuality and libido
  • Prevents varicose veins and spider veins
  • Provides your body with all essential mineral and every necessary trace mineral it needs to thrive
  • Helps treat emotional disorders
  • Preserves serotonin and melatonin, known antidepressant neurotransmitters
  • Helps the kidney to pass excess acidity into the urine
  • Is a strong anti-stress element for the body
  • Helps maintain muscle tone and strength
  • Stops excess saliva production
  • Strengthens bone structure. Osteoporosis, in many ways, is a result of salt and water shortage in the body
  • Prevents muscle cramps

(Natural Health International, 2014)

 

 

 

 

 

 

CELTIC SEA SALT (Holistic Health Reforms, 2014), (Water Benefits Health, 2013)

 

 

Coarse Gray Sea Salt (Celtic Salt)
Coarse Gray Sea Salt (Celtic Salt)

 

 

Celtic sea salt is naturally extracted through sun drying and is grayish in color. It supplies, in bio-available form, all 82 trace minerals needed by the human body for optimal health.
Celtic salt is harvested off the shores of Brittany in France.
Health benefits provided by Celtic sea salt:

Regulates heartbeat and blood pressure. Refined salt can cause high blood pressure. Natural salt with adequate water intake can help to stabilize irregular heartbeats and normalize blood pressure. In other words, if you have low blood pressure, taking Celtic sea salt can help to raise it. If you have high blood pressure, it can help to lower it.

Eliminates mucus buildup. Celtic salt helps eliminate existing mucus buildup and also helps prevent it – making it very helpful for people with allergies, asthma, sinus issues, or bronchial congestion.

Improves brain function. Sea salt also helps to extract excess acidity and toxins from brain cells. It supports the health of nerve cells and their ability to communicate and process information.

Balances blood sugars. Celtic sea salt helps balance blood sugars so is especially helpful for diabetics.

Alkalizes the body. Excess acidity in the body is an underlying cause of many diseases. Salt is vital to the removal of excess acid wastes from the cells. In addition, mineral-rich salt will help maintain an optimal acid-alkaline balance.

Reduces toxins. And overall helps prevent ill-health.

Increases energy. Salt and water are the key elements for the generation of hydro-electric energy in the cells. Fatigue results when sodium and trace minerals are deficient in the body.

Provides electrolyte balance. Natural Celtic salt stimulates salivation, helps balance and replenish all of the body’s electrolyte minerals, releasing excess sodium and water. For problems with water retention, gradual sea salt intake can help to release the excess water stored in body tissue.

Builds immunity. Regular intake of natural sea salt and its highly absorptive minerals can provide a higher resistance to illness, infections, and disease. It can also help your body to heal faster after an injury or surgery and aids in relieving skin conditions.

Promotes restful sleep. The abundance of trace minerals in natural sea salt will have a calming effect on the entire nervous system. In addition, the proper ratio of water and salt consumption can help to prevent the need to urinate during the night.

Prevents muscle cramps. Muscle cramps are often caused by an electrolyte imbalance, especially a lack of sodium. Celtic sea salt provides these minerals in the correct proportion. Your body will take what it needs and get rid of the rest, as long as you are drinking enough water.

Generally restores good digestion.

Will keep virtually indefinitely if properly stored.

Contains all 82 vital trace minerals. These vital trace minerals are needed to promote optimum biological function and cellular maintenance.

 

 

 

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MALDON SALT (Maldon Crystal Salt Company, 2014)

 

 

 

Maldon Salt from Essex, England
Maldon Salt from Essex, England

Maldon sea salt is produced by evaporating the salty waters of the Blackwater River that winds through southeast England, in Essex County. The water is filtered and carefully evaporated to create pyramid-shaped crystals that have a large surface area but are very thin and light in texture. It’s pure white color and flaky texture adds a crunch as a finishing salt on food.
Salt has been harvested in Essex for over 2,000 years, when seawater was partially evaporated and then heated in clay pots over open fires. When all the water was gone, the pots were broken open to reveal the resulting salt crystals.
Maldon salt is still made in much the same way. Seawater is filtered and boiled to remove any impurities. Then it’s heated until the salt turns into beautiful crystals.
According to the Domesday Book completed in 1086 on orders of William the Conqueror, there were 45 salt pans operating in the Maldon area and 100’s more across the county. The Guild of Salt Makers was founded in 1394 and its sign, the three cups, is still seen in Essex.
All the other salt makers were taxed out of existence, leaving Maldon as the last survivor of this long history of high quality salt making.
Unrefined Maldon salt crystals are mild tasting, crunchy, and retain high levels of the trace minerals and elements the human body needs to function properly.
 

 

Essex Salt Harvest (Source: www.maldonsalt.co.uk)
Essex Salt Harvest
(Source: www.maldonsalt.co.uk)

 

 

 

 

HAWAIIAN RED SEA SALT (Saltworks, 2014-A)

 

 

Coarse Hawaiian Red Sea Salt (Alaea)
Coarse Hawaiian Red Sea Salt (Alaea)

Hawaiian Red Sea Salt, also known as Alaea, is the traditional sea salt Hawaiians use for seasoning and preserving food; in healing rituals for medicinal purposes; and in ceremonies to cleanse, purify and bless tools and canoes.
It is an unprocessed sea salt rich in trace minerals found in sea water. A small amount of harvested reddish Hawaiian clay (Alae) enriches the salt with iron oxide.
It’s available as coarse and fine crystals and works well in a salt grinder. Good for roasting or grilling meats, it’s the traditional seasoning for native Hawaiian dishes such as Kalua Pig, Hawaiian Jerky, and Poke.
I grind some as a finishing salt onto salads and other dishes.

 

 

 

FLEUR DE SEL (Bitterman, 2014)

 

 

 

fleur de sel 1 oz

 

Fleur de Sel (‘Flower of the Sea’) is a sea salt harvested by hand in France by skimming salt ponds. It’s 100% pure, quantities are limited, and the salt is quite expensive.

 

Harvesting Fleur de Sel
Harvesting Fleur de Sel

 

Fleur de Sel is believed by many chefs to be the best finishing salt on earth –  lending a highly desirable level of complexity to food.  It’s distinguished by fine, glistening crystals in a pale shade resembling the color of summer clouds.
Its crystals are irregularly sized and unevenly shaped. The smaller crystals dissolve quickly in the mouth, discharging a salty intensity.
A good Fleur de Sel has about a 10.3% residual moisture which allows the crystals to repel outside moisture so they don’t melt as easily as a drier salt, providing a satisfying crunch when eaten on food.
Fleur de Sel is also  very high in mineral content, due to the well-controlled evaporation process of the paludiers (salt rakers) who harvest it from the pans where the sea water is evaporated. It contains .25% calcium, .37% magnesium, and .09% potassium – as well as varying trace quantities of iron, zinc, manganese, and dozens of other minerals. all these combine with the sodium chloride to form a well-rounded, mellow finishing salt.
And finally, it is beautiful. Its moist, refractive crystals range in color from from barn owl gray to oyster white.

 


 IMG_0617

 

 

 

BLACK LAVA SEA SALT (Infinite Salt Creations, 2014)

 

 

Black Lava Salt from Hawaii
Black Lava Salt from Hawaii

 

Black Lava Salt is from Hawaii and is a blend of unrefined sea salt and purified volcanic charcoal. This salt is evaporated in above-ground pools that formed naturally from lava flows. Activated charcoal, a proven anti-toxin and digestive-tract palliative, is added for color and for its detoxifying effects. Many people take it as a nutritional supplement.
Black Lava Salt has an unforgettable aroma and important health benefits from the charcoal in the lava. Its striking color and interesting smoky taste make it a great finishing salt for any dish. It’s especially good on salads, vegetables, sushi, grilled steak, teriyaki chicken or tofu.
Charcoal is good as a natural aid for stomach and gas ailments. It also helps prevent the stomach and intestines from absorbing most poisons or drugs.
I can tell you from personal experience that its crystals are too wet to work in a salt grinder, but they’re relatively soft so can be pulverized using your fingers.

 

 

Grilled Pineapple Finished with Black Lava Sea Salt
Grilled Pineapple Finished with Hawaiian Black Lava Sea Salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PREMIER PINK SALT (Premier Research Labs, 2014)

 

 

Pink Salt by Premier Research Labs is from ancient Mediterranean & Hawaiian Alaea sea beds. It's raw, tasty, & has many health benefits
Pink Salt by Premier Research Labs is from ancient Mediterranean & Hawaiian Alaea sea beds. It’s raw, tasty, & has many health benefits

 

My holistic health care practitioner recommended Premier Research Labs’ Pink Salt to me in 2010 while we were treating my nasty Clostridium difficile infection, suggesting that I mix a small amount into filtered water or just lick it off my hand daily to help rebalance my electrolytes.
This pink salt has a robust flavor that’s much stronger than either the Hawaiian Alaea or Himalayan Pink Sea Salts I use daily.
Premier Pink Salt is a blend of two premium, untreated, unheated, solar-dried sea salts: pure Mediterranean Sea Salt and Alaea Hawaiian Sea Salt.
The Mediterranean salt has sparkling white crystals. The crystals of the Alaea (described in another section above) are a dark pink with orange tones. Both salts contain valuable trace elements that are missing from regular, processed table salt.
Premier Pink Salt does not contain any of the ‘anti-clumping’ chemicals commonly added to regular table salt – no aluminum hydroxide, refined sugar, stearic acid, sodium ferrocyanide, calcium phosphate and other undesirable additives.
This salt combination is rich in electrolytes and provides bio-available minerals for the body to produce other essentials minerals and hydrochloric acid necessary for proper digestion.

 

 

 

Bioavailability
Bioavailability

 

Laboratory testing has shown that Premier Pink Salt contains quantum state phytonutrients that deliver the Quantum Nutrient Effect. The Quantum Nutrient Effect (QNE) refers to the phenomenon of  truly synergistic nutrients working together to create an effect far greater than the sum of their individual benefits – by a factor of 2 to 100 fold or more.  This combination promotes the most rapid shift to ideal cellular resonance for targeted organs and glands in the body, thus helping achieve a quantum leap to greater health. (Kelley, no year)

 

 

quantum

 

 

 

Benefits of Salt in Your Diet

“. . .all of us have in our veins the exact same percentage of salt in our blood that exists in the ocean, and, therefore, we have salt in our blood, in our sweat, in our tears. We are tied to the ocean. And, when we go back to the sea. . . we are going back to whence we came.”

-John F. Kennedy

 

 

 

A Variety of Unrefined Sea Salts
A Variety of Unrefined Sea Salts

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES

Bauman, D. (2012). Let’s Talk about Real Salt.  See:  http://www.myhumblekitchen.com/2012/07/lets-talk-about-real-salt/

Bitterman, M. (2014). The Four Facets of Fleur de Sel. Salt News.  See:  http://www.saltnews.com/2006/12/the-four-facets-of-fleur-de-sel/

Center for Science in the Public Interest. (2014). Salt’s Deadly Toll.  See: http://www.cspinet.org/salt/

Ener-Chi Wellness Center. (2013). 16 Reasons Why Eating Unrefined Salt Benefits Our Health.  See:  http://www.ener-chi.com/eating-unrefined-salt-benefits-our-health/

Freeman, S. (2014). How Salt Works. HowStuffWorks.com.  See:  http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/salt5.htm

Holistic Health Reforms. (2014). Why Use Celtic Sea Salts?  Health Freedom Resources. See:  http://healthfree.com/celtic_sea_salt.html

Infinite Salt Creations. (2014). Black Lava Salts.  See:  http://www.infinitesaltcreations.com/blog/black-lava-salts/

Kelley, L. (no year). Quantum Nutrient Effect.  See:  http://www.drleakelley.com/qne.htm

Kresser, C. (2012).  Shaking up the Salt Myth: The History of Salt. See:  http://chriskresser.com/shaking-up-the-salt-myth-history-of-salt

Kurlansky, M. (2002) Salt: A World History. See: http://www.amazon.com/Salt-World-History-Mark-Kurlansky/dp/0142001619

Maldon Crystal Salt Company. (2014). Maldon and the Essex Saltmakers.  See:  http://www.maldonsalt.co.uk/The-Story-Maldon-and-the-Essex-Salt-Makers.html

Natural Health International. (2014). Himalayan Crystal Salt.  See: http://www.himalayancrystalsalt.com/health-benefits.html

Premier Research Labs. (2014). Pink Salt Premier.  See:  http://www.prlabs.com/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=3_20&products_id=291

Radiant Health Strategies. (2010). All About Salt.  See:  http://www.radianthealthstrategies.com/healing_power_of_salt.php

Salt Works. (2014). History of Salt.  See:  http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/si_HistoryOfSalt.asp

Salt Works. (2014 – A). Alaea Hawaiian Sea Salt. See:  http://www.saltworks.us/alaea.html#.U91BJYBdXF8

Thomas, P. (2009). What Type of Salt is Best? Ecologist.  See:  http://www.theecologist.org/green_green_living/health_and_beauty/270993/what_type_of_salt_is_best.html

Underground Health. (2013).  Amazing Benefits of Himalayan Pink Salt.  See:  http://www.undergroundhealth.com/himalayan-pinksalt/

Water Benefits Health. (2013). Celtic Sea Salt: 10 Key Health Benefits and Usage. See:  http://www.waterbenefitshealth.com/celtic-sea-salt.html

 

 

© Copyright 2014 Joan Rothchild Hardin. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER:  Nothing on this site or blog is intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.